Student Success Advisor Training
Foundation Program
Session 1:
Orientation to Griffith &
to the SSA Role
Acknowledgment of Country
In the Spirit of Reconciliation
Following on from Sorry Day
I would like to acknowledge the Traditional
Custodians of this land that we are
meeting on today, the Yugambeh People,
and pay respect to their Elders past &
present
Overview
Three Questions
• What are the academic contexts in which you
will be working?
• Who are our students with whom you will be
working??
• What is the general focus of your SSA role?
What are the academic contexts in
which you will be working?
Four Academic Groups
PVC
Health
Business
AEL
SEET
What is the notional structure of an
academic Group?
PVC
Dean
(Academic)
Dean
(L&T)
Student Success
Team of SSAs
L & T Team
(CCs, BLAs)
School
School
School
School
What are types of Degree Program
contexts in which you might work?
Aligned
Feeder
Degree
Program
School
Common Start
Foundation
Year
Degree
Program
Sc
Sc
Sc
P
P
P
Business Group (GBS) Departments
• Dept of Accounting, Finance & Economics
• Dept of Employment Relations & Human
Resources
• Dept of International Business & Asian Studies
• Dept of Marketing
• Dept of Tourism, Leisure, Hotel & Sport
Management
• School of Government & International Relations
Business Group (GBS) Programs
Undergraduate Degree Programs
 Bachelor of Business (Nathan & GC)
 Bachelor of Business (HTERS) (Nathan & GC)
 Bachelor of Commerce (Nathan & GC)
 Bachelor of International Relations (Nathan &
GC)
 Bachelor of International Business (Nathan &
GC)
Health
 Applied Psychology (MG & GC campuses)
 Public Health (GC)
 Nursing & Midwifery (Nathan, Logan & GC)
 Human Services & Social Work (Logan & GC)
 Medicine (GC)
Health Foundation Program for the first year (GC) x 5 Schools
 Pharmacy (GC)
 Medical Science (GC)
 Dentistry & Oral Health (GC)
 Rehabilitation Sciences (GC)
 Public Health (Bachelor of Nutrition & Dietetics) (GC)
Arts Education and Law (AEL)
School of Criminology & Criminal Justice
Griffith Law School
School of Humanities
School of Education & Professional Studies
School of Languages & Linguistics
Griffith Film School
Qld Conservatorium
Qld College of Art
SEET
Four Schools
School of Engineering
School of Information & Communication
Technology
School of Environment
School of Biomedical & Physical Sciences
What is the SSA role?
Student Success Advisors
Goal
Co-creating a student success culture in a
School or Program.
Context
Embedded in a specific academic setting(i.e., a
particular School/Program on a particular
campus.
Embedded...not arms length!
Embedded....but not stuck!
Embedded...but not consumed!
Embedded ....in working partnerships!
See the Handout for your embedded
practice contexts
Who are our Students?
Griffith Student Context
Institutional Context
• Large metropolitan university (1 of 7 in S-E Qld)
across 5 campuses x 60 k corridor.
• Enrolment of 42,000
Student Diversity
• 70% of students are first-in-family at uni
• 6th highest low SES student intake in Australia (as high
as 45% in some Programs)
• 3rd highest Indigenous student intake in Australia
• 25% International student enrolment
Keithia Wilson GU - May 2012
Higher Education Political Context
• Moving from an elite (0-15% participation) to
a mass model (16-50%) of higher education
(Trow, 2004).
• Federal policy driver of widening student
participation in Higher Education – A FAIR GO!
(Bradley Report, 2008)
• Increasing the access to and success of
students from low SES and disadvantaged
backgrounds to university.
Keithia Wilson - Griffith University 2012
Who are our students?
What is Student Diversity?
Traditional Students
(TS)
Non-Traditional Students
(NTS)
•
•
•
•
•









medium-high SES
second generation
higher entry levels
full time
on-campus
Elite Model
low SES
first-in-family
lower entry levels
full-time & working
not on-campus much
Indigenous
NESB, International, refugees
disability
Mature are with home care
responsibilities
 from rural & remote settings
Mass Model
Prof Keithia Wilson ALTC National Fellow
What do we assume our students
know?
What do we assume our students
know?
Two domains of assumed knowledge
1. Foundational Academic Skills
Well- recognised by support and
academic staff
2. Academic Capital
The Hidden Curriculum generally less
well recognised, understood or
acknowledged by academic staff
What are some Foundational Academic Skills?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Information Literacy
Computer Literacy
Reading Skills
Written Communication
Numeracy Skills
Critical thinking & analysis
Independent Learning (self-regulation)
(viz. time on task, self-study, time management, uni-worksocial life balance, successful student behaviour)
Prof Keithia Wilson ALTC National Fellow
What are some aspects of academic or
cultural capital?
The “Hidden Curriculum”
Student role
Understanding student role expectations & successful behaviour
(realistic role appraisal, time investment necessary to achieve,
predictors of success, home study desk, computer access)
Performance Expectations
Reading the academic context for performance requirements about
studying & especially assessment (different language, academic
jargon)
Help-seeking
Capacity for help-seeking without fear of negative labelling
(dumb/stupid)
Identity as a student
Sense of belonging & personal fit with university & role (overcome the
“outsider within” phenomenon – “A stranger in a foreign land”)
Prof Keithia Wilson ALTC National Fellow
Are non-traditional students (NTS)
capable of being successful at university?
Are non-traditional students (NTS)
capable of being successful at university?
The national research evidence shows:
• The success rate (or tendency to pass their year’s
subjects) of low SES students is 97% of the pass rates
of their medium & high SES peers & has been stable
over the last 9 years (Bradley et al, 2008:30)
• However, they require higher levels of support to
succeed e.g., financial assistance, academic support,
mentoring & counselling services (Commonwealth
of Australia, 2009)
Prof Keithia Wilson ALTC National Fellow
How do we contribute to our
students’ success?
Types of Intervention Approaches to
the First Year Experience
First Generation Strategies = Co-Curricular
A focus on designing FYO &E supplemental activities & strategies
which are outside of the classroom (Orientation, Peer Mentoring)
Second Generation Strategies = Curricular
A focus on enhancing FY curriculum design, pedagogy and
assessment practices
Third Generation Strategies = Systemic
Whole-of-Institution
Institution wide approach to 1st & 2nd generation strategies, with
practice standardisation & QA mechanisms for continuous
improvement (FYAs/Cs & SSAs)
Whole-of-School/Program
Strategic combination of 1st & 2nd generation strategies for a
particular disciplinary context (FYA/Cs & SSAs)
An Integrated Griffith Strategy
Where does the Student Success
Advisor fit in the overall strategy?
A co-curricular role, designed primarily as a
proactive intervention role for enhancing
student engagement, success and retention.
How does the Student Success
Advisor role contribute?
Primary
Focus
Secondary
Focus
Student Success Advisor Role is:
Outcome oriented and focused on being a
‘game changer’ in students lives.
Informed by and contributes to an ongoing
evidence base about ‘what makes a
difference’ or ‘produces results’.
How shall we learn more about our roles as Student
Success Advisors?
Student Success
Advisor
Institutional Strategy
School Strategy
Partnerships
Student Success
Advisor
Institutional Strategy
School Strategy
Partnerships
Student Success
Advisor
Strategic Activities
Strategic Goals
Practice Frameworks and Principles
Your reactions so far?
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GRIFFITH OVERVIEW - Griffith University