Nurturing Young Minds
DEMOCRACY, CULTURE,
ANTI-BIAS CONCEPTS
AND BRAIN RESEARCH
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
a
Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
Valerie Rhomberg
Mothercraft Institute
for Early Development
Toronto, Canada
www.mothercraft.ca
Nurturing Young Minds
LINKAGE BETWEEN ANTI-BIAS AND
DEMOCRACY GOALS
Anti-Bias/Culture
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
Positive sense of self
but not superiority
Empathy with diversity
Problem solve/critical
thinking regarding
differences
Taking action when
faced with unfairness
regarding differences
Democracy Goals
All people are created
equal
Commitment to the
values of tolerance,
co-operation and
compromise
Citizenry responsibility to
participate in and protect
rights and freedom
Nurturing Young Minds
Premises for Linking
Anti-bias and Brain Research
#1
Each Addresses
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
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CANADA
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
Emotional
Well-Being
Nurturing Young Minds
Premises for Linking
Anti-bias and Brain Research
#2
Each Addresses
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
Relationships
Environments
Nurturing Young Minds
Premises for Linking
Anti-bias and Brain Research
#3
Each Addresses
AFFECTIVE
Mothercraft Institute
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Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
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CANADA
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Mothercraft 2005
Developmental
COGNITIVE
LANGUAGE
Areas
Nurturing Young Minds
Premise #1: Emotional Well-Being
Anti-Bias
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
a
Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
supports positive
but not superior
sense of self
esteem
supports standing
up for others and
self
=
emotional wellbeing
Brain
Research
supports
emotional wellbeing as the key
to healthy brain
development
Nurturing Young Minds
Premise #2: Relationships
Anti-Bias
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
empathetic
interactions with
and exposure to
people and items
reflecting
differences and
similarities lead to
a comfort level
with diversity
Brain Research
supportive relationships
result in emotional
stability
Nurturing Young Minds
Premise #2: Environments
Anti-Bias
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
a
Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
environments
reflective of children,
their families and
expanding awareness
of differences within
the framework of
diversity components
result in positive
responses to
differences leading to
emotional wellbeing for all involved
Brain Research
Supportive, stable
environments result in
emotional well being;
this impacts the release
manner of brain chemicals
causing a balance of their
releases between the
excitatory and the
inhibitory parts of the
brain, responsible for self
regulation; this, in turn,
enables self-regulation
which, in turn, leads to
feelings of self worth
resulting in emotional
well-being
Nurturing Young Minds
Premise #2: Environments and
Relationships
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
Anti-Bias
Brain Research
exposure to
stereotypes, exclusions,
prejudice
causes inability to deal
with the realities
connected to diversity
concepts, leading to
emotional turmoil and
stress
consistent stressful,
unresponsive
environments result in
emotional turmoil,
causing stress, leading
to lack of synaptic
connections in the brain
BRAIN PICTURE:
EMOTIONAL STABILITY VS EMOTIONAL TURMOIL
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
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CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
SOURCE: Centre for Educational Enhancement and Development
Nurturing Young Minds
Premise #3 : Affective Development
Anti-Bias
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
supports skills of
positive feelings for
self/others/
differences
and
empathy for diversity
=
emotional well-being
Brain Research

emotional well-being
has an impact on
healthy development
of the brain
architecture
Nurturing Young Minds
Premise #3 : Language Development
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
Anti-Bias
Brain Research
supports exposure and
interactions with
diversity, including
languages, leading to
awareness of,
empathy for,
realization of, comfort
level with similarities
and differences
the brain at birth has
the ability to produce
any language
Nurturing Young Minds
Premise #3 : Cognitive Development
Anti-Bias
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
supports
awareness and
understanding of
self, of others;
realization and
recognition of
self/others/
differences;
builds on
familiar/
unfamiliar
Brain
Research
adding the
unfamiliar to the
familiar builds
and strengthens
brain synapses
Nurturing Young Minds
SUMMARY
ANTI-BIAS/DIVERSITY CONCEPT IMPLEMENTATION
RESULTS IN EMOTIONAL
WELL BEING
BRAIN RESEARCH INDICATES EMOTIONAL
WELL BEING BENEFITS HEALTHY BRAIN
DEVELOPMENT
CONCLUSION
BRAIN RESEARCH AND ANTI-BIAS ARE LINKED
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
ANTI-BIAS GOALS AND DEMOCRATIC GOALS ARE
LINKED
EXAMPLES OF PRACTICE
“NURTURING YOUNG MINDS”
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
Nurturing Young Minds
SAMPLE OF ANTI-BIAS/DIVERSITY CONCEPTS
ABILITY
physical, mental, emotional capabilities
AGE
perception of what makes someone old or young
APPEARANCE
body height, scars, burns, freckles or other “marks” on body
BELIEF
religious, political, spiritual and “believe in nothing” beliefs
CLASS
social and economic elements that indicate a person’s status
CULTURE
common traits of living shared with members of the same group
FAMILY FORM
structure and composition of families and roles assigned within the
family
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
a
GENDER
a person’s sex; male or female and roles assigned based on sex
LANGUAGE
spoken word and all its global variations, scripts
LIFESTYLE
ways of living one’s life; i.e. on a boat, in a tent, travelling/nomadic..
Not related to class
RACE
set of physical characteristics genetically determined, such as skin
color, hair; each race might incorporate many ethnic groups
SEXUALITY
sexual orientation and preferences (for younger children reflected
through family form)
Developed by Valerie Rhomberg, 1999; revised 2005
Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
Nurturing Young Minds
REFERENCES
Begley, Sharon. Your Child’s Brain. Newsweek. ISSN: 0028-9604. Feb. 19, 1996. pp. 55-6
Bruer , J:The Myth of the First Three Years: A New Understanding of Early Brain Development and Lifelong Learning, The Free Press, 1999
CCCF/CICH 2001: Nourish, Nurture, Neurodevelopment – NEURODEVELOPMENTAL RESEARCH: IMPLICATIONS FOR CAREGIVER
PRACTICE
Diamond, Marian and Janet Hopson. Magic Trees of the Mind, How to Nurture Your Child’s Intelligence, Creativity, and Healthy Emotions.
Dutton and Sons, New York, NY, 1998
Goleman, Daniel. NY: Bantam Books, 1995.
Gonzalez-Mena J. and Eyer, D. Infants, Toddlers and Caregivers. Mayfield Publishing Co., Palo Alto, 2003
Hall, N.; Rhomberg. V.: THE AFFECTIVE CURRICULUM: Teaching the Anti-Bias Approach to Young Children Nelson 1995
McCain, M & J. Fraser Mustard : The Early Years Study Three Years Later, From Early Child Development to Human Development 2002
Nash, J. Madeleine. Special Report: Fertile Minds. Time ISSN: 0040-781X. February 3, 1997. pp.48-63.
Shore, Rima: Rethinking the Brain: New Insights into Early Development, Families and Work Institute, 1997
Mothercraft Institute
for Early
Development
1992 Yonge St.
Suite 301
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1Z7
CANADA
www.mothercraft.c
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Copyright
Mothercraft 2005
Siegel, Daniel J.: UCLA School of Medicine – INFANT MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL, Vol. 22(1-2), 67-94 (2001 © 2001 Michigan Association
for Infant Mental Health
TOWARD AN INTERPERSONAL NEUROBIOLOGY OF THE DEVELOPING MIND: ATTACHMENT RELATIONSHIPS, “MINDSIGHT,” AND
NEURAL INTEGRATION
Sylwester, Robert. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. ASCD, 1250 N Pitt St. Alexandria, VA 22314.
1995
Willis, C. Your child’s brain: Food for thought. Southern Early Childhood Association, Little Rock, AR. 1999
WEBSITES
www.zerotothree.org
http://www.bainconnections.com
http://www.neuroguide.com/
www.uku.fi/laitokset/neuro/linkspsy.htm
VIDEOS
How Caring Relationships Support Self Regulation: 416-415-4668 or write Marie Goulet, George Brown College – ECE Program, Nightingale
Campus, PO Box 1015 Station B, Toronto M
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