Using the ILO SOLVE Programme
to Promote the Quality of Work
and Social Dialogue in the
Enlarged European Union
"Psychosocial Risk Management-European Framework"
Berlin, Germany
Dr. David Gold
International Labour Office
25 January 2008
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
1•1
Case study
• 16-18 years old
• First job
• Lack of experience
• Lack of tacit knowledge
• Lack of formal knowledge
• Strong desire to succeed
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
1•2
Hazards
Situation
Level of
risk
Outcomes
• Occupational accidents
Physical
• Occupational diseases
Biological
Chemical
Ergonomic
Psychosocial
• High personal
demand
• High
professional
demand
• Limited or no
control over
demands
•
Increased
exposures to
risks
•
•
•
•
Stress (Burnout)
Violence
Depression
Addictions (Alcohol, drugs,
smoking, cyber addiction,
gambling)
• Inadequate nutrition
• Inadequate exercise
• StrongProblems
sexual drive
Addressing Psychosocial
at Work
•
•
•
Absenteeism,
presenteeism,
job loss
Pain, distress,
illness
Disability
Death
1•3
Can Social Dialogue
Play a Role in
Reducing the Risk of
Psychosocial Problems
Related to Work?
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
1•4
Disharmony at Work May Have
Many Causes
• It was perhaps not so difficult when all
•
the workers came for the same village
or the same community.
With the highly mobile workforce of
today, workers may now, in Europe
come for different countries, speaking
different languages, with different
cultural values
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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Definition: The Ottawa Charter
• Health
•
promotion is the process of
enabling people to increase control over
their health and its determinants.
This is done be strengthening individual
skills and capabilities and the capacity of
groups to change the many conditions,
particularly the social and economic
causes, that affect health.
1986
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
1•6
The Karasek Model
Demand
Low
High
High
Control
Low
Source: Karasek 1979
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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• The ability of a worker to
discuss issues with an
employer, without fear, gives
a worker a feeling of control
• A higher perception of control
translates into less stress
• Can the reduction of stress
lead to a lower risk of
psychosocial problems?
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
1•8
Addressing
Psychosocial Problems
at Work
An ILO Educational Approach to Formulate
a Comprehensive Policy and Actions at
Work to Address These Problems
International Labour Office
Examples of the Scope of the Problem
•
•
•
•
In Canada, 50% of workers suffer from a high
level of stress (1999, Public Heath Canada).
In Europe, 23% of workers reported overall
fatigue (2000, European Survey on Working
Conditions).
In a US study, 32% of 586 nurses identified
themselves as victims of workplace violence
(Colorado Nurses Assn, 1997).
In a study of 954 New South Wales police
personnel in Australia, 20% would seek advice
from work-place staff about alcohol (1999).
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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The Problem
Violence
Alcohol and drugs
Stress
Tobacco
HIV/AIDS
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
1•11
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
1•12
Expanding SOLVE
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
1•13
What SOLVE Addresses of the Top Ten
Health Hazards
• Underweight
• Unsafe sex
• High blood pressure
• Tobacco
• Alcohol
• Contaminated water
• Sanitation and hygiene
• Iron deficiency
• Indoor pollution
• High cholesterol and obesity
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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Factors Influencing Psychosocial Issues
The community
The social
environment
Work
The
family
The
person
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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Focus on the Individual
For the worker:
•
•
•
•
•
•
higher risk of accident
increased family or social
problems
stigmatization and discrimination
deteriorating health
physical or psychological illness
pain, distress, disability and death
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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Focus on the Workplace
For the enterprise or organization:
• poor morale
• increased absenteeism,
presenteeism, turnover
• reduced productivity
• reduced profits or services
• higher costs
• reduced competitiveness
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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The Goal of SOLVE
Integration of psychosocial
issues into a comprehensive
organizational policy and
development of action based on
the policy
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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The SOLVE Cycle
Broadening
organizational policy
through SOLVE to
include psychosocial
problems
Evaluating workplace
psychosocial problems
and modifying the
concept as needed
Identifying
specific problems
and assessing
needs
Implementing
workplace action
through MicroSolve
modules
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
1•19
The SOLVE Programme
The SOLVE methodology moves from concept to
policy to action
• Briefing package for managing directors
• The SOLVE policy-level course …
• SOLVE for mid-level managers
• Course for peer counsellors …
• SOLVE for course directors
• An introduction to SOLVE for workers
• MicroSOLVEs (22)
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
2 hours
4 days
3 days
2 days
5 days
1 hour
1.5
hours
1•20
Adjustment to Culture, Ethnicity
and Language through Simulation
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
1•21
Methodology
Each of the SOLVE elements follows an educational
scheme that works in multiple domains of learning
•Building an open attitude
towards the subject
•Building a sufficient
knowledge base so that the
participant can apply
knowledge learnt
•Applying the new knowledge
through exercises
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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•
•
•
Within the 32 hour SOLVE Policy Course,
there are twelve hours of role-play
simulation exercises.
Participants bring into the simulation
exercise their cultural, ethnic, ethical values
and apply them in a non-threatening policy
building exercise.
The simulation exercise is based on the
concept that through social dialogue,
problems can be solved and both quality
and productivity can be assured.
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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What is the Policy-Level SOLVE Course?
A 32-hour interactive
programme for
operational managers
•
•
•
Provides tools to design a
corporate policy including
psychosocial problems
Demonstrates the impact
on workers’ families and
communities
Highly interactive:
• case study analysis
• simulation exercises and
• policy development activities
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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Capacity to Organize SOLVE
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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Capacity to Organize SOLVE
SOLVE has been translated into in the
following languages
• English
• French
• Spanish
• Thai
• Portuguese
• Russian
• Bulgarian
• Italian
• Arabic
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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For Further Information
Dr. David Gold
SOLVE
SafeWork
International Labour Office
1211 Geneva 22
Switzerland
Email: [email protected]
Phone: +41-22-799-7515
Fax: +41-22-799-6878
Web site: www.ilo.org/safework/solve
Addressing Psychosocial Problems at Work
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