Module 5:
Effective Service Delivery
to CSEC Victims
“The program is a space where
I can be myself…Because it’s
like, they don’t judge me on
things that I do or things that
I’ve been through in the past.”
- CSEC survivor
Effective Service Delivery to CSEC Victims
Objectives…
• Learn to integrate components of service provision
and programming for CSEC victims into your
agency’s services for youth.
• Practice counseling techniques for working with
commercially sexually exploited children and youth.
• Discuss challenges inherent in providing services and
programming to commercially sexually exploited
children and youth.
Tough Questions for
Service Providers
Tough Questions for Service Providers:
1. How do you engage with a child who doesn’t want to
engage?
2. How do you get CSEC victims to understand exploitation
when they don’t think they are being exploited?
3. How do you deal with a child who you have been working
with long term, who is making positive progress in his/her life,
who understands the dynamics of exploitation, who goes
back to the life?
4. How do you work with a girl who has a “daddy” and says she
is in love with him?
5. How do you engage with sexually exploited kids on the
street?
6. How do you deal with a child who is actively recruiting other
youth from your agency?
7. When recruiters and pimps know the location of your agency
what should you do?
Essentials of Service Delivery for
Children and Youth
Safe Space
Cultural Competency
Youth Development
PHYSICAL SAFETY
Safe Space
 Choose a safe location
 Install a security system
 Maintain a confidential address
 Recognize and respond to limitations of a
confidential address: protocols around exploiters
knowing location
 Set rules for appropriate conduct for youth
 Create a staff code of conduct/ethics and ensure
training
 Create an inviting, youth friendly space
 Provide space for confidential
interviews/counseling
EMOTIONAL SAFETY
Safe Space
 Appropriate music (do not play music that promotes sexual
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exploitation)
Decorate the space with appropriate, informational, and/or
inspiring images
Use appropriate language (be especially sensitive to
derogatory terms in reference to sexually exploited youth)
Create policies that address recruitment in the agency
Respect children’s need for privacy and confidentiality
Set protocols for counseling that ensures privacy and
confidentiality (i.e. Door open or closed)
Conduct mental health assessments
Encourage and practice self-soothing/self-care for staff and
youth
Promote an inclusive and non-judgmental community
Provide ongoing professional development opportunities to
ensure a trained and sensitive staff
Cultural Competency
 Staff have a thorough understanding of impact, dynamics, and
subcultures of CSEC
 Build on the cultural strengths of youth & incorporate these into
programming
 Employ staff that speaks the language(s) of clients
 Print promotional materials in languages used in the community
 Make an effort to maintain a staff population that is representative
of client population (consider gender, race/ethnicity, sexual
orientation, etc.)
 Support survivor voices and/or work with survivors of CSEC
 Work with a CSEC victim as a whole person, not just a victim of
abuse.
 Accommodate mental health services to ensure they are sensitive
to cultural/community perception of metal health care
 Take into account community relationships with outside agencies
when building relationships
 Celebrate and foster diversity in your agency (staff and youth
populations)
Youth Development
 Believe that all sexually exploited youth have the ability to be
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leaders
Infuse programming with youth leadership opportunities
Give youth ownership of aspects of program planning
Provide age appropriate, engaging, and youth friendly activities
Provide a continuum of services to meet immediate and long term
needs
Address all areas of adolescent development in programming:
physical,
cognitive, psychosocial
Offer access to diverse learning experiences
Create opportunities for youth to learn and master new skills
Focus on providing opportunities for youth to build healthy self
esteem
Foster a sense of belonging and importance in the community
Create opportunities for investment and empowerment within the
community
Incorporating CSEC
Making CSEC a Priority at Your Agency
1.
Decorate the space with posters or materials from CSEC awareness campaigns.
2.
Make available youth friendly brochures on CSEC and local
resources/service providers.
3.
Offer staff training on CSEC and working with sexually exploited youth.
4.
Include questions about CSEC on intake and processing forms.
5.
Incorporate the issue of CSEC into broader social justice education
programming.
6.
Offer special workshops on CSEC.
7.
Purchase educational materials from agencies serving CSEC victims.
8.
Invite speakers from survivor led organizations to speak with your
9.
Offer a weekly prevention youth group that is safe and non-judgmental.
youth.
10. Design or modify intake, assessment, and referral forms to gather information
specific to CSEC and risk factors.
Reflection Questions...
Homework!
1. Evaluate your agency/organization according to the 10 ways of
Making CSEC a Priority at Your Agency.
1. How well does your agency prevent or address CSEC?
2. Is there anything about your agency that could contribute to or
perpetuate CSEC?
3. Create a list of recommendations for your agency.
Question: Have you ever initiated a
conversation with a child about
CSEC?
What did you say?
Addressing Concerns:
Asking Youth About CSEC
• “It seems like you’re a little scared of your boyfriend. Would you like
to talk about that with me?”
• “It’s tough to be out there on your own, how are you surviving on the
streets?”
• “Has anyone ever asked you to, or made you feel like you had to
have sex in exchange for money, shelter, clothes, or food?”
• “How does that make you feel?”
Counseling Technique:
Motivational Interviewing
Activity:
Personal Reflection
Motivational Interviewing Is…
a directive, client-centered counseling style
for eliciting behavior change by
helping clients to explore and
resolve ambivalence.
The examination and resolution of
ambivalence is its central purpose, and the
counselor is intentionally directive in
pursuing this goal.
Fundamentals of MI…
1. Motivation to change is elicited from the client, and not imposed
from without.
2. It is the client's task, not the counselor's, to articulate and resolve his
or her ambivalence.
3. Direct persuasion is not an effective method for resolving
ambivalence.
4. The counseling style is generally a quiet and eliciting one.
5. The counselor is directive in helping the client to examine and
resolve ambivalence.
6. Readiness to change is not a client trait, but a fluctuating product of
interpersonal interaction.
7. The therapeutic relationship is more like a partnership or
companionship than expert/recipient roles.
Therapist Behaviors…
 Seeking to understand the person's frame of reference, particularly via
reflective listening
 Expressing acceptance and affirmation
 Eliciting and selectively reinforcing the client's own self
motivational statements expressions of problem recognition,
concern, desire and intention to change, and ability to change
 Monitoring the client's degree of readiness to change, and
ensuring that resistance is not generated by jumping ahead
of the client
 Affirming the client's freedom of choice and self-direction
Stages of Change Model
Take a look at Handout 5.5 Stages of
Change in CSEC Counseling…
How familiar are these behaviors to you?
Motivational Interviewing Techniques
Open-Ended Questions
 Cannot be answered with a "yes" or "no"
 Begin treatment sessions with open-ended
questions
 "What brings you here today?"
 "Tell me about what's been happening since we
last met?"
 "So what makes you feel that it might be time for
a change?"
Motivational Interviewing Techniques
Affirmations
 Build rapport and confidence
 Must be congruent and genuine
 Recognition of strengths
 Communicate that change is possible and that they are
capable of implementing that change
 Can be rare and valuable for individuals focused on
failure
Motivational Interviewing Techniques
Reflective Listening
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The key to this work: listen carefully to your clients
Listen for what has worked and what hasn't
When in doubt about what to do, listen
Focus on their change talk and provide less attention to nonchange talk
"You are not quite sure you are ready to make a
change, but you are concerned that…”
Can be surface level reflection (repeating back what an
individual says) or in reference to deeper, perhaps unstated
feelings
Keeps momentum moving forward
Motivational Interviewing Techniques
Summarize
 A specialized form of reflective listening
 Reflect back to the individual what he or she has been telling
you
 A way to communicate your interest in a client
 Call attention to important elements of the discussion or shift
attention or direction
 Summarize frequently as too much information can be unwieldy
 Highlight ambivalence
 Announce that you are about to summarize, list selected
elements, give an invitation to correct anything, and conclude
with an open-ended question
Interaction Technique: OARS
Open-ended Questions
A question that cannot be answered with yes or no, that opens up a
larger conversation.
Affirmations
Recognition of the client’s strengths.
Reflective Listening
Listen to the client and focus on change talk. Reflect back to them
what they have told you, making connections between themes.
Summary
Announce that you are going to summarize, list selected elements of
what the client has told you, and ask them to make meaning of these
things.
Motivational Interviewing:
Role Play
• Each group will do 3 role plays.
• Each role play will be 3 minutes long.
• Act out stage of change: pre-contemplation,
contemplation, and relapse.
• Use all counseling tips, tools, and sample questions
to help you.
• Observers fill out form.
Guidelines
• Do your best to empathize with your character.
• Do not rely on stereotypes for your acting.
• Incorporate aspects of yourself, your thoughts and feelings.
• Be patient with yourself, this is just practice.
• Observers observe only.
Debriefing Questions:
1. How did that feel?
2. How did it feel to be the counselor?
3. How did it feel to be the child?
4. What did you notice as the observer?
5. On a scale of 1-5 how prepared do you feel to talk
about CSEC with children/youth at your agency?
More on Counseling…
• Handout 5.8 Service Provision Tips 101
• Module 8: Medical and Mental Healthcare of
CSEC Victims
• Handout 8.4 Behaviors and Symptoms
Associated with CSEC Trauma
Bringing Back the Tough
Questions…
Tough Questions for Service
Providers:
1. How do you engage with a child who doesn’t want to engage?
2. How do you get CSEC victims to understand exploitation when
they don’t think they are being exploited?
3. How do you deal with a child who you have been working with
long term, who is making positive progress in his/her life, who
understands the dynamics of exploitation, who goes back to the
life?
4. How do you work with a girl who has a “daddy” and says she is in
love with him?
5. How do you engage with sexually exploited kids on the street?
6. How do you deal with a child who is actively recruiting other youth
from your agency?
7. When recruiters and pimps know the location of your agency what
should you do?
Debriefing Questions:
Did you find any of the service provider responses on Handout 5.9 valuable?
At this point in the training, do you have any
tough
questions of your own you would like to
put out to the group?
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What is CSEC? - Kristi House Child Advocacy Center