EDB Electives (Language Arts)
Professional Development Workshops
for Teachers
Learning English
through
Short Stories
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Introductions
1.Do you have any materials for this elective?
2.Do you know what students have to do for this elective?
3.Do your students like reading?
4.Are you preparing to teach this elective?
5.Have you selected any texts?
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Aims
• To look at what is involved in the Short Stories Elective
• To consider ways in which the module can integrate with,
complement and extend the English language curriculum
• To experience and discuss a variety of learning and teaching
activities based on different key-features related to the module
• To address ways of encouraging and developing learner autonomy
• To raise awareness of factors related to formative and summative
assessment
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Morning
• Introduction to the elective
• Practical Demonstration 1
Break (11.00 – 11.15)
• Practical Demonstration 2
Lunch (12.15 – 13.15)
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Afternoon
• Learning and Teaching Activities
Break (14.15 – 14.30)
• Learner Autonomy and Self-Directed Learning
• Assessment and Feedback
End (16.00)
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
The Place of Language Arts in the Curriculum
• Language Enrichment
• Cultural Enrichment
• Personal Involvement
A range of styles – richness
and variety.
Open to interpretation.
Motivation to give personal
response.
C&AG p87-88
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
The electives should ...
add variety to the English Language
curriculum, broaden the learning
experience and cater for diverse needs
and interests.
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Our target is to:
• encourage students to read, enjoy, write & tell short stories (use
and consolidate their English)
• identify features of short stories – narration, setting, character,
theme, symbol, openings, endings & dialogue see how English
works in short stories
• develop the 3 learning strands - interpersonal, knowledge and
experience through creativity, critical thinking, & cross-cultural
awareness.
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Generic Skills
c
c
c
c-t
i-t
p-s
s-m
s s
n
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Generic Skills
collaboration,
communication,
creativity,
critical-thinking,
IT,
problem-solving,
self-management,
study skills,
numeracy
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Content of the Module
In Part 1, learners are introduced to the aims, design and content of the
module. They will learn to identify and understand the key features of a
short story, and read short stories with appreciation.
Part 1
In Part 2, learners read and write specific aspects of a short story such as
setting, character, theme, dialogue, opening and closing. They will also start to
write their own story for the module by gathering ideas and producing drafts.
Part 2
In Part 3, learners practise oral and story-telling skills by sharing a story of
their own choice with the class. They will finalise the draft for their module
story and perform it to the class.
Part 3
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
The Scheme of Work
Look through the suggested SOW briefly.
How long is the end of course short story the
students write?
About 300 words
What samples of work could students put in
their end of course portfolio?
WRITING
An opening,
An ending
A description of a
place,
A character study,
A story outline,
A dialogue etc..
SPEAKING
A recording /film of
the student telling
a story
It could be an electronic portfolio
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
How can this elective be integrated?
Let’s look at 2 examples……
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
1. How can this elective be integrated?
“Through linking
students learning
experiences in the
compulsory and
elective parts as
well as SBA,
students are
provided with
ample
opportunities to
develop their skills
and strategies..”
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
2. How can this elective be integrated?
Teachers aim to better prepare students for the electives by
……….. the strategic infusion of language arts and nonlanguage arts components into the junior secondary English
Language curriculum.
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
2. How can this elective be integrated?
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Discussion
1. How and when are the electives currently taught in your
school? Do you introduce Short Stories in S1 or S2. Why?
2. What is going to be challenging for you and your students?
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Short Stories often have….
setting
incident
plot
a small number of
characters
a short period of
time
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Terminology
Match the term and the definition.
Then put the blue cards in order.
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
What different types of short stories can we
use?
Part 1 Introduction to the Module
and Approaches to Integration
Types of Short Story
Horror Story
Fable
Love Story
Science Fiction
Detective Story
Adventure Story
Ghost Story
Teen Fiction
Fairy Story
Which story types would your students like? Why?
Have you found or used any texts
or activities which have worked
well with your students?
Share these on your tables.
Practical Demonstrations
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Demonstration 1
• has classroom procedures to help the students to
generate ideas quickly and,
• plan and develop their story around a simple 5
sentence plot structure.
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Freytag’s plot
structure
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Climax
Falling
Action
Rising
Action
Opening
Resolution
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Climax
How about a story
you all know?
Falling
Action
Rising
Action
Opening
Resolution
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
One day a boy found an old gun as he was walking home.
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
One day a boy found an old gun as he was walking home.
He took the gun to an antiques shop.
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
One day a boy found an old gun as he was walking home.
He took the gun to an antiques shop.
The old man who worked in the shop told the boy the gun was
worth only fifty dollars.
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
One day a boy found an old gun as he was walking home.
He took the gun to an antiques shop.
The old man who worked in the shop told the boy the gun was
worth only fifty dollars.
The boy accepted the fifty dollars and went home.
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
One day a boy found an old gun as he was walking home.
He took the gun to an antiques shop.
The old man who worked in the shop told the boy the gun was
worth only fifty dollars.
The boy accepted the fifty dollars and went home.
The next day the old man sold the gun for five thousand
dollars to a gun collector.
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
What do you think?
1. The old man cheated the boy.
2. The boy and the old man both got what they wanted – nobody
lost.
3. The boy should have taken the gun to the police station.
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Let’s use the five sentence framework to write our
own stories. Choose two characters and one object.
A doctor
Some money
A soldier
A gun
An old man/woman
Some flowers
A boy/girl
A car
A police officer
A book
A teacher
A dog
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
One day a boy found an old gun as he was walking home.
He took the gun to an antiques shop.
The old man who worked in the shop told the boy the gun was
worth only fifty dollars.
The boy accepted the fifty dollars and went home.
The next day the old man sold the gun for five thousand
dollars to a gun collector.
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
One day a boy found an old gun as he was walking home.
The gun looked like the ones he had seen in pirate films. It
looked like it needed a good clean.
He decided to take the gun to an antiques shop.
The shop was near the boy’s house. It was always dark inside.
There was
a lot of stuff
thefor
windows
such as medals
‘Is always
there anything
I canindo
you?’ said
from wars
ago. He
had
seen
old‘Can
manyou
who worked
theyears
old man.
‘Yes’
said
thethe
boy.
there many times. The man looked up with surprise when the
give the
meshop.
a price for this gun?’
boy entered
(Using formulaic expressions to request
The old man
told the
boyC&AG
the gun
was
worth only fifty dollars.
and offer
help.
2007
p.17)
The boy accepted the fifty dollars and went home.
The next day the old man sold the gun for five thousand
dollars to a gun collector.
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
• Add 4 more layers to your story (depending on
proficiency) Try to write at least 200 words in total.
• Add 1 or 2 sentences;
• Expand in depth and/or
• Change any of the original sentences if necessary
• Peer editing
• Discussion
• Extending the stories again
• Sharing the extended stories
• Extend again to reach 400 words?
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Reflection Questions
Consider how:
• the writing task was built up incrementally.
• phrases were introduced from the General English
forms and functions guide.
• ‘key features’ were introduced from the language
arts scheme of work (plot and dialogue).
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
1. What did you find useful from this demonstration
and what would you need to add or change for your
students?
2. What else could be added (tasks, texts or
language)?
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Feedback
Staging
Scaffolding
Formulaic Expressions
Modals
Adjectives
Break
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Demonstration 2
• takes an integrative approach - compulsory part,
other electives;
• provides links to Popular Culture, Social Issues, the
Individual and Society (Crime).
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
What characteristics do these animals have?
e.g. Cats are nimble. They are light and stealthy.
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Which animal would a teacher be?
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Can you match the animals to the human characters?
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Our Story
This story was written by Kyle Villagorda Salen from
YMCA of Hong Kong Christian College. The story won a
prize in the British Council Hong Kong’s ‘Stories Alive’
competition in 2011.
Why use students’ stories?
Advantages?
Disadvantages?
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Part 1
Listen to the first part of the story.
Who is the main character and which animals are used to
describe him?
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Part 2
What do you think happens next?
Part 3
Write the final paragraph of the story. Do you need more
support or less support? You choose.
Let’s read and check if your ending is different.
Are there any words you don’t know? Let’s check!
Can anyone help?
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
What does ‘beaten at his own game’ mean?
Do you think he will carry on being a pickpocket?
Does this story have a moral?
Have you lost your wallet or had it stolen? What
happened?
Is pick pocketing a big problem in Hong Kong?
Which crimes are a problem in Hong Kong?
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Reflection Questions
Consider how:
• the story was broken into sections.
• how the activities were different after each section.
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
1. Why was the story broken into sections?
2. What happens when you try to use too much text in
one go?
3. What kind of non-writing tasks could you give your
learners to engage them with the vocabulary and/or
ideas in the text?
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
Feedback
1. Lots of reasons! In order to process the text
more effectively; to engage the learners; to
scaffold from receptive to productive skills; to
provide space to give feedback.
2. Learners become disengaged and anxious.
3. By dramatising or using role plays; miming;
using images and connecting words to them
(comic strip).
Part 2 Practical Demonstrations
HKDSE 2013 – Writing Part B
Vandalism!
Hong Kong Museum hit by vandals…..lots of
damaged artworks….but who did it?
Why did they do it?
The door bell rang and Percy went to the door...
finally
after a long time
luckily
but
he started
to
sadly
at that
moment
he
realised
he decided
not
to
after
a
while
suddenly
Lunch Break
Welcome back
Have you signed in for the
afternoon session?
Learning and Teaching Activities
Part 3 Learning and Teaching Activities
1 Character
Frankenstein
2 Storytelling
Room 13
3 Setting
Using your Senses
Part 3 Learning and Teaching Activities
Information to share with other
teachers
Part 3 Learning and Teaching Activities
Part 3 Learning and Teaching Activities
Let’s share
1 Character
Frankenstein
2 Storytelling
Room 13
3 Setting
Using your Senses
Break
Learner Autonomy
and
Self-Directed Learning
Part 4 – Learner Autonomy and Self-Directed Learning
Questionnaire
Please complete the questionnaire and discuss your
answers with the rest of your group.
Part 4 – Learner Autonomy and Self-Directed Learning
Discussion Questions
1. What makes a responsible learner?
2. What makes an autonomous learner?
3. Why should you develop responsibility and
autonomy?
Part 4 – Learner Autonomy and Self-Directed Learning
Feedback
1. Learners who accept the idea that their own efforts are
important. Learners who are willing to cooperate with the teacher
and their group for everyone’s benefit. Learners who monitor
their own progress and use all opportunities to improve.
2. Learners who can manage their own learning….similar to the
above but…the learners act autonomously - independently of the
teacher without being told what to do e.g. by looking up words
themselves in a dictionary, or by asking the teacher questions
without being prompted/actively making decisions.
3. Success in learning depends as much on the student as it does
on the teacher. These skills and attitudes can help in the future
when needs change and learners have to work independently.
Part 4 – Learner Autonomy and Self- Directed Learning
Learning is most effective when learners take an
active role in the learning process, making choices
independently and directing their own learning. For
this reason, an important goal of school education is
to produce autonomous learners who are capable of
independent thinking and action.
Curriculum & Assessment Guide 2007: p93 – Promoting Independent Language Learning
Part 4 – Learner Autonomy and Self-Directed Learning
Running Dictation
Raising awareness
Helping learners to become more aware of the nature of language learning and
that their contributions can make a difference. It is important that learners find out
which learning strategies work best for them.
Changing attitudes
Structured practice. The learners require more initiative but the activities are still
structured. Pair work and group work are important as they reduce the teacher to
student interaction pattern; the students need to learn to listen and respond to
each other.
Transferring roles
Making choices and taking on some of the teacher’s roles in the classroom.
Increasing independence can reinforce autonomy. By allowing the learners to act
as sources of information, select resources and present a model of the target
language more responsible and autonomous attitudes can be reinforced.
Consequences
Story Recipes
Part 4 – Learner Autonomy and Self-Directed Learning
How do the activities make your students more autonomous?
Share your thoughts with a partner.
Part 4 – Learner Autonomy and Self-Directed Learning
Raising awareness of strategies students can use
Changing attitudes so students interact with each other
more
Transferring roles so students can do more
Reflection
How do you deal with these areas?
Part 4 – Learner Autonomy and Self-Directed Learning
Useful Websites for Self-Directed Learning
http://www.worldstories.org.uk/
http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/story-starters/
Assessment and Feedback
Part 5 – Assessment and Feedback
A range of classroom activities can be used for
assessing learner performance, including:
short pieces of writing
an end-of course short story
sharing a story - orally
Part 5 – Assessment and Feedback
Assessment Guidelines for this Elective?
Assessment in the Short Stories module will focus on the
learners demonstration of their ability to:
1. Understand techniques of Short Stories and apply this to
create short examples
2. Produce a written story
3. Comment helpfully on the work of others
4. Tell a story
5. Read and comment on stories
Curriculum & Assessment Guide 2007: p35
Assessment
self assessment
peer feedback
teacher
Creativity. Your response.
Task achievement.
Language and Lexical Range.
Part 5 – Assessment and Feedback
Student Writing – 5 Sentence Framework
Lets look at an example from British Council Hong
Kong classes.
The students followed the same structure you did.
They created 5 sentence frameworks then added to
them.
Part 5 – Assessment and Feedback
Discussion
Did you:
1. Give a mark out of ten or a grade from A to D?
2. Correct all the errors?
3. Support any effort to be creative by commenting
on things you like or by writing questions for the
writer to consider?
Part 5 – Assessment and Feedback
Guidelines for Formative Assessment
Creativity
Write one or two questions you would like to ask the
writer. Comment on one or two phrases or sentences that
show creativity.
Task Achievement
Assess if the students have completed the task. Does the
story follow the structural guidelines?
Language and Lexical Range
Tenses? Appropriate language? Vocabulary?
Part 5 – Assessment and Feedback
Guidelines for Self-Assessment
1.My story is the required length. YES/NO
2.My story has characters, setting, plot, conflict and a
theme. YES/NO
3.The plot of my story has an opening, rising action,
climax, falling action and a resolution. YES/NO
4.My story is written accurately. YES/NO
5.I am satisfied with my story. YES/NO
Part 5 – Assessment and Feedback
Telling a Story
What should we look for?
1.gestures
2.eye contact with the audience
3.a clear voice
4.pausing to add interest and suspense
5.confidence
6.different voices for the different characters
7.changes the volume of his/her voice
8.relaxed and comfortable
9.facial expressions
10.props where appropriate
Part 5 – Assessment and Feedback
Self and Peer Assessment for the Activities in Part 3
You can find these in the handbook.
• Frankenstein p58
• Room 13 p62
• Setting p66
Enjoy the short stories elective with your
students and thank you for coming today!
Any Questions?
Please take a few minutes to
share your feedback
Descargar

No Slide Title