IB Agenda 8/28 – 8/29
 IBSO Presentation
 Learner profile and introductions
 TOK question discussions continued
 Course overview
 Social contract
 Study skills survey
 Homework: Diagnostic due 9/4(A Day), 9/3 (B Day)
Literature TOK Questions
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Is a work of literature enlarged or diminished by interpretation? What makes something a good or
bad interpretation?
How can a literary work of fiction, which is by definition non-factual, convey knowledge?
What is the proper function of literature—to capture a perception of reality, to teach or uplift the
mind, to express emotion, to create beauty, to bind a community together, to praise a spiritual power,
to provoke reflection or to promote social change?
Does familiarity with literature itself provide knowledge and, if so, of what kind—knowledge of facts,
of the author, of the conventions of the form or tradition, of psychology or cultural history, of
oneself?
What knowledge of literature can be gained by focusing attention on the author? Can, or should,
authors’ intentions and the creative process itself be understood through observing authors or
knowing something of their lives? Is the creative process as important as the final product, even
though it cannot be observed directly? Are an author’s intentions relevant to assessing the work? Can
a work of art contain or convey meaning of which the artist is oblivious?
What knowledge of literature can be gained by focusing attention solely on the work itself, in
isolation from the author or the social context?
What knowledge of literature can be gained by focusing attention on its social, cultural or historical
context?
How important is the study of literature in individual/ethical development? In what ways?
What constitutes good evidence within the study of literature?
What knowledge can be gained from the study of literature?
What is lost in translation from one language to another? Why?
Can literature express truths that cannot be expressed in other ways? If so, what sort of truths are
these? How does this form of truth differ from truth in other areas of knowledge?
IB Learner Profile
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As IB learners we strive to be:
inquirers
knowledgeable
thinkers
communicators
principled
open-minded
caring
risk-takers
balanced
reflective.
Active and Independent Learners
 Active and independent learners:
 develop their natural curiosity
 explore concepts
 exercise initiative
 independently explore new roles and ideas
 express ideas confidently and creatively.
IB Agenda 9/2
 Warm-up: Journal: What are the gender expectations
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of your place, time, and/or ethnicity and how do they
affect your life?
Essay assignment
The Awakening cultural context project. See my
website.
Share results.
How does the cultural and historical perspective on
women’s roles inform your understanding of The
Awakening?
IB Agenda 9/4 - 5
 Warm-up: Write a list of five things you did last
weekend in chronological order.
 Finish presenting on the background of The
Awakening
 How does the cultural and historical perspective on
women’s roles inform your understanding of The
Awakening? Write a paragraph reflecting on a specific
action that a character takes and how it fits into the
context of gender relations around 1900. Use a quote
from the text to support your answer.
 Plot and point of view: Chronicle to story
IB SAT Warm-up 9/8-9/9
Fill in the blanks with the pair of word that makes sense
in the sentence.
 Because King Philip's desire to make Spain the
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dominant power in sixteenth-century Europe ran
counter to Queen Elizabeth's insistence on autonomy
for England, ------- was -------.
(A) reconciliation . . assured
(B) warfare . . avoidable
(C) ruination . . impossible
(D) conflict . . inevitable
(E) diplomacy . . simple
Agenda 9/8-9/9
Goal: Understand and employ strategies
to create character, theme, plot and
point-of-view.
1. SAT Warm-Up
2. Literary elements discussion
3. Impossible Cortes story
IB Agenda 9/10-9/11
 Warm-Up: Describe a place of your choice using
sensory language. Use your voice (diction, syntax,
sound, figurative language) to create a distinct mood
and tone.
 Introduce minor characters project
 Minor character selection
 Timeline and symbolism
IB Agenda 9/12-15
 Warm-up – Setting, mood and tone
 Discuss thesis statements and essay structure
 Analyze essay structure
 Outline essays
Warm-up. How does the author use voice, tone, mood
and description to create a sense of place? What can you
infer about the narrator and what the story will be like?
 In LA, you can’t do anything unless you drive. Now I can’t do anything unless I
drink. And the drink-drive combination, it really isn’t possible out there. If you
so much as loosen your seatbelt or drop your ash or pick your nose, then it’s an
Alcatraz autopsy with the questions asked later. Any indiscipline, you feel, any
variation, and there’s a bullhorn, a set of scope sights, and a coptered pig
drawing a bead on your rug.
 So what can a poor boy do? You come out of the hotel, the Vraimont. Over
boiling Watts the downtown skyline carries a smear of God’s green snot. You
walk left, you walk right, you are a bank rat on a busy river. This restaurant
serves no drink, this one serves no meat, this one serves no heterosexuals. You
can get your chimp shampooed, you can get your dick tattooed, twenty-four
hour, but can you get lunch? An should you see a sign on the far side of the
street flashing BEEF- BOOZE- NO STRINGS, then you can forget it. The only
way to get across the road is to be born there. All the ped-xing signs say DON’T
WALK, all of them, all the time. That is the message, the content of Los
Angeles: don’t walk. Stay inside. Don’t walk. Drive. Don’t walk. Run! I tried the
cabs. No use. The cabbies are all Saturnians who aren’t even sure whether this is
a right planet or a left planet. The first thing you have to do, every trip, is teach
them how to drive.
 MARTIN AMIS Money (1984)
Analytical Essays and Thesis
Statement
 You will take either a text based stance (builds an
argument by focusing on specific features of the
literary text in question) or a context based stance
(builds an argument by focusing on the context in
which a literary text exists).
 Thesis should make a claim about the work that is
arguable, specific and manageable (can be proven in
the appropriate amount of space.
 It should have a statement and a comment - an
observation and a why or how.
Thesis templates
 Next, let’s create a thesis statement. Just plug in your meaning
and your technique(s): (here are 3 different versions)
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In this story, the author uses ______ and _______ to reveal
__________.
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In ____________ by ____________, the author seeks
to _______________ by/through _________________.
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In _____________, Gary Soto examines ___________ through his
use of __________ and __________.
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Thesis Statement – Your thesis should make a claim about the work that is arguable,
specific and manageable (can be proven in the appropriate amount of space.
It should have a statement and a comment - an observation and a why , a how, or an
explanation of why it is important.
Are these good thesis statements, and if not, how can they be changed.
 In “Snow White,” attractive women are depicted as helpless and
men are so enthralled by helplessness as to appear necrophiliac.
 In The Awakening, the ocean functions as a symbol of both
freedom and death, demonstrating Chopin’s belief that in the
oppressive society of the Gilded Age, women can only achieve
liberation through social suicide.
 Mademoiselle Reisz expresses the preoccupations of the
Victorian era in her music.
 While Edna’s servants in The Awakening, are largely unnamed
and rarely discussed, their existence is pivotal because they
provide a critique of Edna’s middle class pre-occupation with
herself, suggesting that for nonwhite women of the lower classes,
self-actualization is not even an option.
Paragraph Template
 Topic Sentence (supports thesis)
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Direct quote (evidence from story)
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Explain first example (commentary: explain HOW that
method/technique conveys that meaning)
 Introduce second example
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Give second direct quote
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Explain second example
 Concluding sentence
 If you are using outside sources, you will be using them to
comment on and contextualize the primary text.
Analytical Paragraph
 For example, “ “
 Commentary (explain WHAT is happening in the story at this time)
 Connection: (explain HOW this example shows the concept in your
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thesis)
Another example “ “
Commentary (explain WHAT is happening in the story at this time)
Connection (explain HOW this example shows the concept in your
thesis)
Conclusion (a big picture observation about the story and the concept)
*Use Quote Introduction worksheet to integrate your quotes. YOU
MUST INTRODUCE A QUOTE.
 CM: “Here,...”
 CN: “Therefore” “This shows” “As such,” “Consequently,”
SAT Warm-up: Choose the word or set of words that, when
inserted in the sentence, best fits the meaning of the sentence
as a whole. Write the sentence correctly in your journal.
 Dahntay’s ------- over winning the prestigious prize
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was ------- only by the fact that his father was unable to
attend the ceremony.
(A) incredulity . . misconstrued
(B) ebullience . . tempered
(C) bashfulness . . extended
(D) satisfaction . . confirmed
(E) relief . . conveyed
IB Agenda 9/16-17
 Goals: Construct effective analytical thesis statements
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and body paragraphs.
Warm-up
Group thesis critiques
Peer editing
Writing/Revision time
IB Agenda 9/19
HAPPY INTERNATIONAL TALK LIKE A PIRATE DAY
 SAT Warm-Up
 Grade report sheets
 Work day – you may work on your paper or work on
your presentation if your paper is complete. Please
keep conversations fairly quiet so that others can write.
I am happy to meet with you to go over drafts, outlines
or thesis statements or to talk about your project. You
may not do work for any other class. I will also be
calling you up to check proposals.
 Return essays
 For next class: Final draft, outline, peer edit, first draft
SAT Warm-up 9/18
 Writing > Improving Sentences
 Part or all of the following sentence is underlined; beneath the
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sentence are five ways of phrasing the underlined material. Select
the option that produces the best sentence. If you think the
original phrasing produces a better sentence than any of the
alternatives, select choice A.
Like machinery was integral to the development of industrial
capitalism, so the rapid transfer of information is the force
driving modern business.
(A) Like
(B) Given that
(C) Since
(D) Just as
(E) Although
Creative Presentation Examples
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNXe13iVcqM
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Dsd7eV7lpE
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuUCgphkkhI
To Be in Love by Gwendolyn Brooks
 http://www.poemhunter.com/best-
poems/gwendolyn-brooks/to-be-in-love/
SAT Warm-Up
 Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted in
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the sentence, best fits the meaning of the sentence as a
whole.
The senator chose to incur dislike rather than ------her principles to win favor with the public.
(A) gratify
(B) endorse
(C) accuse
(D) compromise
(E) advertise
IB Agenda 9/22-23
 Goals: Editing for wordiness, creating effective creative
presentations
 Edit and turn in papers – Simplicity and Clutter
Include final drafts, first draft, outline and peer edit.
Final draft should be on top
 Examples of presentations and scoring
 Work on presentations
SAT Question of the Day 9/25 –
9/26
 The following sentence contains either a single error or no error
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at all. If the sentence contains an error, select the one underlined
part that must be changed to make the sentence correct. If the
sentence contains no error, select choice E.
(A)When people gave up the hunter-gatherer way of life and
began to cultivate the soil and grow their food, they often (B)
became less mobile, built more substantial residences,
and (C)they developed (D)more effective means of storage.
(A)
(B)
(C)
(D)
(E) No error
IB Agenda 9/25
 Great Gatsby IOP
 Work on creative projects/presentations. You should be
ready to present on Wednesday. No exceptions! Please let
me know if you need any special equipment.
 For next time: Creative project, presentation, rationale, and
presentation planning sheet/materials are due.
 If your creative project can be printed, please print it.
Otherwise, be sure you send it to me or give me a location
where it can be found.
 You may turn in one presentation, rationale and planning
sheet per group, but all group members full names must be
on each sheet.
SAT Warm-Up 9/26 - 29
 Critical Reading > Sentence Completions
 Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted in the
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sentence, best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.
Mr. Warmington considered himself a connoisseur of fine
wines, claiming he could -------variations in taste and
quality among any range of vintages he was served.
(A) purvey
(B) discern
(C) efface
(D) mollify
(E) debate
IB Agenda 10/3
 No warm-up - Presentations
 Give me a grading sheet with all group members full names.
 Fill out the “where is my project sheet” for group members. Use all
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group members full names.
Presentations – volunteers then random order.
After you do your presentation, please give me all remaining
materials in your packet. If you have already done your
presentation and not given them to me, please do so today. Also,
double check that supporting materials are where you said they
are.
Missing essays: Mithra, Alyssa, Eduardo, Savannah, Alejandra
and Lindsay. Missing essays not sent to me by Saturday at 8 pm
will not be accepted and are likely to result in a failing grade!
After you have looked over your essays, please return them to me unless
you plan to revise.
IB Agenda 10/6
 1. Writers Journal: Who do you think influences you the most:
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your family, your community or your experiences?
Go to
http://grammar.about.com/od/rhetoricstyle/a/20figures.htm
and read about figures of speech.
Then take the quiz on:
http://grammar.about.com/od/terms/a/revquiz20terms.htm
Then go to the Zorah Neale Hurston Webquest on my website.
Find 2-3 partners, divide websites you will explore, and share
notes.
For next class: Read Chapters 1-4 in Their Eyes Were Watching
God and write 3 discussion questions that have to do with voice,
style, figurative language, or how the story is told.
SAT Question of the Day
 Part or all of the following sentence is underlined; beneath
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the sentence are five ways of phrasing the underlined
material. Select the option that produces the best sentence.
If you think the original phrasing produces a better sentence
than any of the alternatives, select choice A.
Archaeological evidence shows that Viking ships were
lighter, slimmer, and faster than that in England.
(A) that in England
(B) they had in England
(C) they had been in England
(D) those used by the English
(E) that of the English
Ships at a distance have every man’s wish on board.
(Noun) (prepositional phrase) (verb) (adverb) (adjective) (noun) (prepositional phrase)
For some they come in with the tide.
(prepositional phrase) (noun/noun pronoun) (prepositional phrase)
For others they sail forever on the horizon, never out
(contrasting prepositional phrase) (same noun or pronoun) (verb) (adverbial phrase), (adverbial
phrase), (adverbial phrase)
of sight, never landing until the watcher turns his eyes away
in resignation, his dreams mocked to death by time. That is
the life of men.
Now women forget all those things they don’t want to
remember everything they don’t want to forget. The dream
is the truth. They act and do things accordingly.
SAT Question of the Day
 The following sentence contains either a single error or no
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error at all. If the sentence contains an error, select the one
underlined part that must be changed to make the sentence
correct. If the sentence contains no error, select choice E.
Wynton Marsalis (A)emerged as one of the great
trumpeters (B)of the late twentieth century, (C)winning
Grammy awards for both his jazz (D)and even classical
works. (E)No error
(A)
(B)
(C)
(D)
(E)
IB Agenda 10/14
 Sentence Imitation
 Learn about how author’s use voice and figurative
language
 Style – imitate structure
 Style – Examples of figurative language/effect
Metonymy, chiasmus, synecdoche, antithesis, anaphora,
irony – situational, dramatic and verbal, extended
metaphors, similes and analogies. On page ___,
Hurston uses
to do
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 Discussion
IB
nd
2
6 Weeks Unit Objective
 Students will learn how to analyze and imitate an
author’s style and use of figurative language.
 In response to a complex prompt, students will be able
to write a well-constructed analytical essay that
supports a thesis with cogent textual references and
commentary.
Warm Up: Write your own sentence in which you mimic
Hurston’s grammatical structure as closely as possible.
 Ships at a distance have every man’s wish on board.
 (Noun) (prepositional phrase) (verb) (adverb)
(adjective) (noun) (prepositional phrase).
 EX: Cats in my house know all my secret thoughts
through ESP.
We will analyze this passage as a group using the “Elements of Literary
Style Handout at the back of Your Packet. Write your own 2 paragraph
composition in which you use Hurston’s style and an extended metaphor
to contrast 2 groups. Use chiasmus, antithesis, and anaphora if you can.
Ships at a distance have every man’s wish on board. For
some they come in with the tide. For others they sail
forever on the horizon, never out of sight, never
landing until the watcher turns his eyes away in
resignation, his dreams mocked to death by time. That
is the life of men.
Now women forget all those things they don’t
want to remember and remember everything they
don’t want to forget. The dream is the truth. They act
and do things accordingly.
Discussion Questions. Answer and
give a specific reference for each.
 How do sex and love inspire artistic works and life
changes? How do we make so much out of this one
area of life? What is the mechanism?
In his review of Their Eyes Were Watching God, Richard
Wright, a Harlem Renaissance wrote:
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Miss Hurston voluntarily continues in her novel the
tradition which was forced upon the Negro in the
theatre, that is, the minstrel technique that makes the
"white folks" laugh. Her characters eat and laugh and
cry and work and kill; they swing like a pendulum
eternally in that safe and narrow orbit in which
America likes to see the Negro live: between laughter
and tears.
 Is this criticism fair?
Discussion Questions. Answer and
give a specific reference for each.
 How do sex and love inspire artistic works and life
changes? How do we make so much out of this one
area of life? What is the mechanism?
 What does an audience contribute to a story?
 How does the town of Eatonville function as chorus?
Are there multiple “choirs”. When are specific
examples of times they are wise, foolish, thematically
appropriate, symbolic, etc. What are some different
things they represent.
 What does Janie’s family history of slavery have to do
with her first choice of husband?
 Was Joe a better choice than Logan?
 What symbols do you see and how are they developed?
Chapter 1 Question
Select Quotes from the Text that Support Your
Answer
 Chapter 1 Questions: Select quotations from the
text that support your answers.
1. Hurston begins the book with an extended metaphor.
What are the dreams of men? How are they different
from the dreams of women? Who doesn’t get
disappointed?
Chapter 1
 The first two pages are loaded with figurative
language, as though Hurston was writing poetry in
book form. What is the effect of this? Is it hard to
understand? What is the effect of having to work a
little harder to understand all the layers of her opening
pages?
Chapter 2
 Janie’s scene with the pear tree is gentle and lovely.
Compare this to the description of Nanny as a different
kind of tree. Discuss the description of Nanny and
how the different symbols affect you.
Chapter 3
 1. Why does Hurston start the chapter, “There are years
that ask question and years that answer.” How does
this anticipate the rest of the chapter?
Chapter 4
 4. Look at the imagery surrounding Janie and Joe’s
meeting: If Joe does not “represent sun-up and pollen
and blooming trees, but he spoke for far horizon,” why
does Janie go with him? What changed, if anything?
What is the tone here?
Chapter 5
 How would you describe Amos’ and Lee’s purpose in
the novel so far? How are they characterized?
Chapter 6
 1. In this chapter, Hurston uses dialect to be funny.
Was Richard Wright correct when he criticized her
and said it sounds like a minstrel show?
SAT Warm-Up 10/16
 The following sentence contains either a single error or no error
at all. If the sentence contains an error, select the one underlined
part that must be changed to make the sentence correct. If the
sentence contains no error, select choice E.
 Beluga whales, (A)which are also called sea canaries (B)because
of their high-pitched chirps and gregarious natures, are the only
animals (C)known mimicking the sounds( D)of human speech
spontaneously. (E)No error
(A)
(B)
(C)
(D)
(E)
Agenda 10/16 - 17
 Goals: Analyze style, language, character and theme in
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Their Eyes Were Watching God
Warm-up
Assign questions and analytic essay/ explain graded
discussion
Close reading passage 84-87/Style Questions
Direct and Indirect Discourse
Discussion questions
Chapter 6
 3. The mule scene is rather famous. How does Hurston
personify the mule? Why does Hurston do this?
Chapter 7
 1. What finally makes Janie stand up to Jody in public?
What changed?
IB Warm-up 10/17
 Look at the first paragraph in Chapter 14. You will be
writing one paragraph in which you analyze it and a second
in which you use it as a model. You will have 7 minutes to
write each of these paragraphs. Please write them on a
separate piece of paper.
Step 1: Write a one paragraph analysis of the style of this
passage and the effect it creates. Be sure to address 3 of the
areas on the “style checklist” we used last time. You might
start out: In this paragraph, Hurston uses X, Y, and Z to
highlight
.
Step 2: Write a paragraph about Halloween night in the style
of this paragraph.
Agenda 10/17 - 20
Goals: Analyze style as it relates to character and theme;
Develop listening, speaking and close reading skills.
Style analysis and imitation paragraphs
2. Graded discussion
1.
Their Eyes Were Watching God Graded
Discussion Chapters 8-13
 I will project questions and give you @ two minutes to think
about each one. To receive full credit for an answer, you must
back it up with specific references to the text. This is a
discussion you are having with your classmates, so interact with
them rather than with me. You may agree or disagree with them,
expand on their points or introduce another perspective.
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Grading standards
3+ exceptionally insightful answers = 100
3+ fully supported answers = 90
2 exceptionally insightful answers = 80
2 fully supported answers = 70
1 exceptionally insightful answer = 60
1 fully supported answer = 50
Chapter 8
 3. Janie and Joe’s final conversation represents their
whole life together. Discuss the dynamic between
them.
Chapter 8
What did you notice about voice, style, narration and
figurative language in this chapter, and how does this
relate to character development and theme?
Chapter 9
 Biblical allusion #4: Creation and Janie’s part in it –
what can you infer about Janie now?
Chapter 9
 What did you notice about voice, style, narration and
figurative language in this chapter, and how does this
relate to character development and theme?
Chapter 10
 Compare and contrast Janie’s meeting Tea Cake with
the moment she met Logan and the first moment she
saw and spoke to Jody. Difference? Similarities? What
is Hurston’s purpose?
Chapter 10
 What did you notice about voice, style, narration and
figurative language in this chapter, and how does this
relate to character development and theme?
Chapter 11
 When Tea Cake says, “Have de nerve tuh say whut you
mean,” what is the impact on Janie? What is the
impact on you? What kind of characterization is this?
Chapter 11
 What did you notice about voice, style, narration and
figurative language in this chapter, and how does this
relate to character development and theme?
Chapter 12
 Hurston starts this chapter in another voice. Who’s
voice is it and how does it help define the community?
Chapter 12
 How does Hurston use Phoebe in this chapter? How
does she use her in the rest of the book? Why?
Chapter 12
What did you notice about voice, style, narration and
figurative language in this chapter, and how does this
relate to character development and theme?
Chapter 13
 Tea Cake spends Janie’s $200. What is your reaction?
How would you have reacted if you were Janie? Why
does Hurston have Tea Cake do this?
Chapter 13
 What did you notice about voice, style, narration and
figurative language in this chapter, and how does this
relate to character development and theme?
Chapter 14
 How does the community of the Muck compare to
Eatonville? (And if you’ve read Gatsby, how do the
communities in Their Eyes compare to the
communities in Fitzgerald’s world?)
Chapter 15
 What happens in this chapter? Why does Hurston put
this chapter here?
Chapter 16
 Mrs. Turner is very clearly prejudiced. How does Janie
react to her? Why does Mrs. Turner like Janie?
Chapter 17
 This is the first chapter in a while in which Janie seems
to lose her voice. We know about the beating and what
the men say afterwards, but Janie herself doesn’t
speak. Why does Hurston do this? How should we
respond?
IB Warm Up
 We will be looking at the beginning of an essay by Alice
Walker called “In Search of Our Mother’s Gardens” and
doing a style analysis and imitation.
Look at the first pages of “In Search of Our Mother’s Gardens.”
Please write your answer on a separate piece of paper.
Step 1: Carefully annotate the first 2 pages of “In Search of Our
Mother’s Gardens” for style using the style checklist. Be sure to
include the effect of the stylistic choices in your notes.
Step 2: Write a paragraph about Janie’s spirituality in the style of
this essay.
IB Agenda
 Style analysis and imitation – “In Search of Our
Mother’s Gardens”
 Graded discussion
 Hero’s Journey PPoint
IB Agenda 10/23
 Warm-Up: Famous Paradoxes and Sophisms
 Hero’s Journey
 Discuss TEWWG and essay questions
 Extra credit project – make a poster of Janie’s internal
or external hero’s journey using images and quotes for
each stage of the journey.
IB Agenda 10/24
 Warm-Up: Mimesis and clay: Make something that
represents freedom or existentialism.
 Academic essay introductions
 Body paragraphs
IB Agenda 10/28
 Warm-Up: Mimesis and clay: Make something that represents
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freedom or existentialism.
Academic Essay Introduction
Overview of essay structure
Thesis statements
Introductions
Due next class: Thesis statement, outline including topic
sentences for body paragraphs, introduction
Please buy A Passage to India. We will be using it.
Due dates: 10/30 – Thesis, outline, intro
11/3 – Body Paragraphs and Conclusion
11/5 – Draft
11/7 – Final Draft
IB Agenda 10/29
 Warm-Up: Mimesis and clay: Make something that
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represents freedom or existentialism.
Academic Essay Introduction
Overview of essay structure
Thesis statements
Introductions
Due next class: Thesis statement, outline including topic
sentences for body paragraphs, introduction
Please buy A Passage to India. We will be using it.
Due dates: 10/31 – Thesis, outline, intro
11/4 – Draft
11/6– Final Draft Due
IB Agenda
th
8
Period 10/29
 “Godfather” clip
 Academic body paragraph warm-up
 Body paragraph Ppoint
 Write body paragraphs and conclusion.
 Due dates: 10/31 – Body paragraphs due
11/4 – Draft due
11/6 – Final draft due
IB Agenda
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th
6
Period 10/31
Happy Halloween
Exam registration reminders
“Godfather” clip
Academic body paragraph warm-up
Body paragraph Ppoint
Intro, thesis and outline check
Pictures
Write body paragraphs and conclusion.
 Due next class: Draft of essay
IB Agenda
th
8
Period 10/31
 Happy Halloween!
 Pictures
 Body paragraph color code and sentence structure
check
 Work time and individual conferences
 Introduction and body paragraph check
 Drafts due next class
IB Agenda 11/3
 Warm-up: “The Godfather” and gangster movie
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paragraph.
Body paragraph pitfalls
Body paragraph color code and sentence structure peer
edit.
Body paragraph check
Conclusions
 Work time
 Drafts due next class
Body Paragraph Peer Edit
COLOR CODE
 Topic Sentence
 Concrete Detail
 Commentary
 Concluding Sentence
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Does the topic sentence support the thesis?
Do all concrete details and commentary support the topic sentence?
Are quotes and paraphrases smoothly integrated and documented?
Is commentary insightful and meaningful?
Possible errors: Is commentary generic? Does it drift from the topic? Is
it really just more concrete detail? Is it repetitive? Is it contradictory?
 Are there multiple types of sentences such as compound, complex, and
compound/complex?
Sentence types
 Compound: In Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston uses Logan
Killicks to explore the implications of slavery; he is a representation of the
protected, respectable life that was never available to Nanny.
 Complex: Since Zora Neal Hurston uses Janie’s hair to symbolize her
womanhood, freedom and sexuality, the staid citizens of Eatonville are
scandalized when the 40-year-old Janie returns from her adventure with Tea
Cake “’wid her hair swinging down her back lak some young gal’” (2).
 Compound/Complex: Because Hurston believed in the power of voice to
communicate culture, she used dialect to explore the importance of
storytelling in the creation of meaning, but she used more formal English to
create the persona of an educated and intellectual author/narrator.
 Fragment (Dependent word): Because Janie believed that she would only be
fulfilled if she found a lover who recreated her girlhood dream of fertile,
blooming sexuality as embodied by the pear tree.
IB Agenda 11/4
 Conclusions and MLA Style
 Peer Edit
 Final Draft of Essay Due Next Class!
 Get copy of A Passage to India by Monday.
IB Agenda 11/5-6
 Warm-up: Proofread essays
 Final Drafts on Top
 IOP Assigned
 Watch, analyze and score sample IOP’s
 Bring A Passage to India for next class
IB Agenda 11/10 - 11
 Warm-up: Watch and score IOP
 A Passage to India webquest
 For next class, read A Passage to India through
Chapter 5. We will have a short quiz over the content.
IB Agenda 11/12-13
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Warm-up: Watch and score IOP
Late work forms/IOP Proposal Examples
A Passage to India Quiz
Discuss webquest results
Post-colonial theory powerpoint
Discuss A Passage to India
 For next class: Read Chapters 6-9, Quiz
 Some time in class (@ 20 minutes) to plan for IOP’s.
 Be ready to meet with me 11/19 about IOP’s. Proposals are
due 11/19 at the beginning of class.
IB Agenda 11/17
 Warm-up: Watch and score IOP
 A Passage to India 5-9 Quiz
 Post-colonial theory powerpoint
 For next class: Read Chapters 10-17, Quiz
 Be ready to meet with me 11/18 about IOP’s. Proposals
are due 11/18 at the beginning of class.
IB Agenda 11/18-19
 Quiz 10 - 17
 Finish Post-Colonial Presentation
 Conferences/Work on Projects
 All proposals due in hard copy.
 For next time: Read Chapters 18-23 - quiz
 Finish A Passage to India over Thanksgiving.
IB Agenda 11/20
 Quiz Chapters 17-23
 Passage to India Post-Colonialism Posters
 IOP Conferences
IB Agenda 11/21
 Quiz Chapters 18-23
 Unit Test Review
 Finish Post-Colonialism PowerPoint
 IOP Conferences/Work on IOP
IB English III Agenda 12/1
 Sign up for presentation times.
 Unit Test – You may use A Passage to India and a
dictionary when taking this test. Please be sure to read
the passages carefully before answering the questions.
 Discuss the end of A Passage to India
IB English III 12/4
 Go over test
 Discuss end of Passage to India
 Work on presentations
IB Agenda
th
6
Period 12/5
 Presentations
 Allegra, Olga, Dani and Alliyah
 John and Alden
 Rachel
IB Agenda
th
4
 Presentations:
 Ariel
 Chanse
 Gandy
 Luka and Darrian
Period 12/8
IB Agenda 12/9
th
6
Period
 Presentations:
 Reagan, Celine, Angela
 Cassidy
 Ale and Nyssa
 Ashley
 Please fill out your grading form with your full name
and the title of the book(s) you are addressing and give
them to me before your presentation.
IB Agenda 12/9
th
8
Period
 Presentations:
 Kelly Tran
 Anna Garrett &Kristine Bermudez
 Gray Marshall
 Courtney Gilbreath
 Please fill out the rubric with the title of the book(s)
you are addressing and give it to me before you
present.
Mark Bands from May 2014 (These
change annually)
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7 = 26-30
6 = 22-25
5 = 18-21
4 = 14-17
3 = 11-13
2 = 6-10
1 = 0-5
 4 and up are generally passing. Most scores are in the
middle - 4’s and 5’s.
IB Agenda 12/10
th
(4
Period)
 Brief discussion of mark scheme.
 Presentations
Sara and Nirusha
2. Marcus
3. Kae and Gianna
1.
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After presentations are complete, I will be happy to
discuss your marks with you.
Scores
 30 = 100
 29 = 99
 28 = 98
 27 = 97
 26 = 96
 25 = 95
 24 = 94
 23 = 93
 22 = 91
21 = 89
20 = 86
19 = 83
18 = 80
17 = 78
16 = 76
15 = 74
14 = 72
13 = 69
12 = 67
11 = 65
10 = 63
9 = 61
8 = 59
7 = 57
6 = 55
5 = 53
4 = 51
IB Agenda 12/11
th
6
Period
 Brief discussion of mark scheme.
 After presentations are complete, I will be happy to
discuss your marks with you
Presentations
 Savannah
 Faith
 Adriana
 Ruth, Alyssa and Alexis
 Mithra
IB Agenda 12/12
Presentations:
David
Tony and Andrew
Finals Day:
Gabriela
Bradley
Kae and Gianna
Dave and Kaleb
th
4
Period
IB
th
8
Period Agenda Finals Day
Ms. Brosche will come to talk to you about some
program nuts and bolts for the last 20 minutes.
Books to Purchase for Next Semester:
The Essential Rilke Paperback trans by
by Galway Kinnell and Hannah Lieberman
The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera
How to Read a Poem by Edward Hirsch
IB Agenda 1/6 – 1/7
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Welcome back! Where in the world did you go?
Semester 2 structure
Poetry notebook assignment
Poetry annotation/interpretation questions
 For next class: Read Chapter 1, “Message in a Bottle” from How to
Read a Poem.
 Please purchase How to Read a Poem by Edward Hirsch. An
electronic copy is fine. It is available for Kindle or on Google
Books for $9.99
 Bring The Essential Rilke to class
 Bring your poetry notebook to class. You will be bringing this
every day!
Where in the world did you go?
IB Agenda 1/12 – 1/13
 Vocabulary Warm-up
 Poetry Notebook check-in
 Poetry annotation
 Rilke presentation
 Sample reflection
 Webquest topic selection
 For next time: Read Chapter 2 in How to Read a Poem
Vocab Warm-up:
- Epic or narrative: Poems that tell a story. Sometimes the
author speaks in the first person, then lets the
characters speak for themselves. Sometimes the poem is
in the third person. An epic is usually long and has a
heroic theme.
- Dramatic: In which the characters do all the talking,
monologue or dialogue, characters are clearly not the
author.
- Lyric: Uttered through the first-person, represents
internal or spiritual life, a meditation
IB Agenda 1/14 - 15
 Goals
 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of individual
literary works as representatives of
 their genre and period, and the relationships between them
 – Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which cultural
values are expressed in literature
 – Demonstrate awareness of the significance of the context in
which a work is written and received
Activities
 Check poems for next class. Quiz over Chapters 1 & 2 of How To
Read a Poem next class. Villanelle form.
 Introduce Webquest – Rilke biography presentation
 Assign webquest topics and begin work
Vocabulary Warm-Up
 Vocab Warm-Up
Caesura: A stop or pause in a metrical line, often marked
by punctuation or by a grammatical boundary, such as
a phrase or clause. Can also be marked by a space.
Enjambment: The running-over of a sentence or phrase
from one poetic line to the next, without terminal
punctuation.
IB Agenda 1/16
 Vocabulary Warm-Up
 Villanelle/Discuss “One Art”
 Work on Webquest
Poetic Vocabulary Warm-Up
With your group, use How To Read a Poem Chapters 1 &
2 and Glossary to define the following and give an
example from the book or from your imagination:
Kenning
Trope
Villanelle (Just the title)
Synaesthesia
Surrealism
Stanza
IB Agenda 1/20
 Vocabulary Warm-Up
 Poetry notebook check in
 Presentations : Cezanne, Rodin and Apollo
 Mini reflective statement
 Discuss “The Panther,” “A Bowl of Roses,” and “Archaic
Torso of Apollo”
IB Agenda 1/21
 Vocabulary Warm-Up
 Perfect rhyme: end/bend
 Slant rhyme: assonance – vowels sound similar: love/have
consonance – consonants sound similar but vowels
are different – love/leave
Internal rhyme: rhyme within a line: Red sky at night, sailors’
delight
 Notebook Check-In
 Poetry notebook check in
 Presentations : Cezanne, Rodin and Apollo
 Mini reflective statement – Homework if not finished
 Discuss “The Panther,” “A Bowl of Roses,” and “Archaic
Torso of Apollo
Vocab Warm-Up: Rhyme
Rhyme Scheme: characteristic patterns of lines
(ababcc)
Perfect rhyme: end/bend
Slant rhyme: assonance – vowels sound similar:
love/have
consonance – consonants sound similar
but vowels are different – love/leave
Internal rhyme: rhyme within a line: Red sky at
night, sailors’ delight.
For Next Class
 Read “Orpheus, Euridice, Hermes” and “Leda and the
Swan”
IB English III Agenda 1/23/15
For next time: Bring annotations and be prepared to
write about: “Orpheus. Eurydice. Hermes.”
IB Agenda 1/26/2015
 Work Day
 For next class: Read “Orpheus, Eurydice, Hermes,”
“Leda and the Swan” and “Requiem for a Friend.” Make
sure you have read “The World is Large and Full of
Noises.” Poetry notebook check next time.
IB Agenda 1/28
 Vocabulary:
Couplet: Two successive lines of poetry, usually rhymed (aa)
Tercet: A three line stanza, often containing rhyme
Greek mythology presentations: Orpheus and Eurydice, Hermes,
Leda and the Swan
 Poetry Notebook Check-In
 Mythology Presentations
 “Orpheus, Eurydice, Hermes” and “Leda and the Swan” small group work
 For next class: Read Duino Elegies 1 – 3 and write at least 10 annotations based
on the annotation questions on each poem. I will check annotations!
IB Agenda 1/29
 Counselor scheduling presentation
 Look at strong poetry commentary and supervised
writing prompt.
IB Agenda 1/30
Please sit 4-5 to a table at a table with supplies
1. Vocabulary Warm-Up
Ode: A celebratory poem in an elevated language on
an occasion of public importance or a lofty universal
theme.
Elegy: A poem of mortal loss and consolation
2. Presentations on elegies and Muslim angels
3. Themes and motifs in Rilke
4. Poem dissection
IB Agenda 2/3 – 2/4
 No warm-up, brief poetry notebook check (last week’s
poems)
 Presentations (we will cap these at 45 minutes – if we
cut anyone off, I will grade their presentations based
on their slides). TAKE NOTES DURING THE
PRESENTATIONS!
 Reflection Paper
Reflection Paper
Answer the following question:
How was your understanding of the cultural and contextual
considerations in the work developed through the
presentation?
 Please make sure that you have a heading including the title “Rilke
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Poetry Reflective Statement,” your name, class period and the date.
Count that you have 300 – 400 words.
Write legibly and proofread.
You must turn your statement in during this class period.
Consider using a “what I thought, what I learned from the
presentation, what I realize now” format.
You will be graded on: “To what extent does the student show that
their understanding of the cultural and contextual elements was
developed through the interactive oral?”
IB Agenda 2/5
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Counselor/Registration Presentation
Poetry notebook check
Discuss supervised writing: We will do the supervised writing on Monday.
Discuss revision
Final poetry notebook due on Wednesday:
Must have:
 Table of contents and poems labeled
 Two typed, revised poems with three drafts of each
 One expanded two page typed commentary on a poem
 Grading 50%: All poems are present, organized and completed in a
thoughtful manner
 25% Revisions show attention to form and meaning and development of
the poem
 25% Expanded commentary is thoughtfully explores the themes and
literary techniques in the poem as well as your response to it.
Revision Considerations
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What are the themes of my poem? What is the mood or tone? Cut or adapt stuff that doesn’t address
these themes or fit with the mood and tone. If you’ve chosen to revise a formal poem, does the form
support the theme, mood and tone?
Is there anything in my poem that seems like filler – doesn’t give new meaning? If so, cut it. Also look
for filler words like articles and adverbs like “Very.” Cut these when you can.
How are my examples of figurative language supporting my theme and supporting the tone and mood
or the poem? If they aren’t, change or eliminate them.
How does the sound of my poem fit with the mood and tone? Read the poem out loud and adapt
rhythm, words, punctuation, line breaks.
Are there any cognitive leaps in my poem? What takes place during the leap and how is it indicated
in the poem.
Consider word choice: how is each of my words powerful in the poem? Eliminate any cliches and
consider synonyms and changing word order to make word choice interesting, surprising, and
supportive of your mood, tone and theme.
Consider your line breaks and punctuation (caesuras, enjambment). Do they highlight important
ideas, create multiple meanings of words, highlight relationships between ideas. Adapt as necesssary.
Consider the shape of your poem on the page, play with structure and line breaks so that you feel that
your form complements your meaning.
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IB Agenda 8/26