Slide 8.1
Chapter 8 : The Mobile Web
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Mobile computing.
The i-mode service.
M-commerce.
Personalised news and learning resources.
Mobile web broswers.
Information seeking on mobile devices.
Presentation of information on mobile devices.
The navigation problem in mobile portals.
Mobile search.
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.2
Mobile Computing
• Mobility supports “anywhere, anytime access”.
• Limitations of mobile devices pose challenging
problems.
• Mobile users have a shorter attention span,
and their information needs are different.
• Wireless markup language allows developers
to deliver information to mobile devices.
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.3
I-mode
Figure 8.1 : I-mode menu
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.4
M-commerce
• Is an extension of e-commerce.
• Potential is huge, need access to services
including: email, messaging, web browsing,
voice interface and location detection.
• Mobile portals can provide services.
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.5
Delivering Personalised News
Figure 8.2 : Daily Learner adaptive news agent
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.6
Delivery of Learning Resources
Figure 8.3 : Map in KnowledgeSea system
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.7
Mobile Web Browsers
Figure 8.4 : Opera browser on mobile phone
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.8
Mobile Web Browsers
• Figure 8.5 : Pocket Internet Explorer
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.9
Information Seeking on Mobile Devices
• Need to reduce the following factors:
– Text input (use alternative input modes).
– Amount of displayed information (present
summaries and reduce graphics).
– Number of clicks to find information (through
personalisation).
– Amount of information delivered to device
(store relevant information on the device).
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.10
Presenting Information on a Mobile Device
Figure 8.9 : Google search on Palm devices
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.11
Presenting Information on a Mobile Device
Figure 8.10 : Thumbnails and detailed views
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.12
The Navigation Problem in Mobile Portals
Figure 8.13 : Typical navigation session
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.13
The Navigation Problem in Mobile Portals
Figure 8.14 : Portal menu after personalisation
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.14
Mobile Search
Figure 8.15 : Web search on mobile phone
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.15
Focused Mobile Search
Figure 8.18 : Palm Pirate search interface
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.16
Personalised Mobile Search
• Only a few results can be displayed on a
mobile device (4 on pda and 2 on phone) so
they must be relevant.
• Use machine learning to learn the user’s
profile.
• Results can be reranked according to the
user’s preferences.
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Slide 8.17
Location-Aware Mobile Search
• Geographic properties of web pages must be
determined.
• Geographic search must take the location into
account – web pages whose location is closer
should be ranked higher.
• A query may be global (find a recipe) or local
(find a restaurant).
Mark Levene, An Introduction to Search Engines and Web Navigation © Pearson Education Limited 2005
Descargar

Document