Giving “Access”
to the Access Courses
What do those standards mean and how can I make them
relevant to my students? Taking a look at the High School
Access Courses for students with significant disabilities. How
to choose appropriate standards and develop relevant
activities that are meaningful to students with the most
significant cognitive disabilities, and how to use assistive
technology to give those students access to those activities.
Kayse Harshaw
Division for Special Education Services
Georgia Department of Education
Knowledge
Look Mom,
We have fungi !!
Level of intelligence/
expections
Level of
interaction/communication
From listener
Access Courses for 2009-2010
• Courses for access classes for 2009-2010 are
in the approved rule IDA(3) at
http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/_documents/doe/l
egalservices/160-4-2-.20.pdf , p. 10.
• Access course descriptions are included with
the DOE Course Descriptions document on the
Curriculum & Instructional services webpage.
English/Language Arts and Math
• 23.06150 Access
•
•
•
to Ninth Grade Literature/Composition
23.06250 Access to 10th Grade Literature/Composition
23.05150 Access to American Literature/Composition
23.05250 Access to English Literature/Composition
Access to Mathematics I
27.08250 Access to Mathematics II
27.08350 Access to Mathematics III
• 27.08150
•
•
– Students enrolled in Access to Mathematics do not require
Math Support Classes
Social Studies
• 45.08150
• 45.08350
• 45.05750
• 45.06150
•
• 45.07150
• 45.07650
Access to United States History
Access to World History
Access to American Government/
Civics (1/2 Credit)
Access to Economics/Business/
Free Enterprise (1/2 Credit)
Access to World Geography
Access to Local Area Studies
Science
Access to Biology I
40.01150 Access to Physical Science
26.06150 Access to Environmental Science
• 26.01250
•
•
Electives
•
20.01450 Access to Life Skills and Careers I
•
20.01451 Access to Life Skills and Careers II
•
20.01950 Access to Life Skills and Careers III
•
20.01951 Access to Life Skills and Careers IV
•
20.01550 Access to Family, Community, and Careers I
•
20.01650 Access to Family, Community, and Careers II
•
20.01750 Access to Family, Community, and Careers III
•
20.01850 Access to Family, Community, and Careers IV
•
20.43050 Access
•
•
•
•
•
to Consumer Economics
20.41650 Access to Food, Nutrition, and Wellness
32.43350 Access to Workplace Readiness
32.81150 Access to Career Technical Instruction I
53.01450 Access to Music Appreciation I
53.02450 Access to Music History and Literature
Elective Content
•
•
•
•
Access to Life Skills and Careers I
20.01451 Access to Life Skills and Careers II
20.01950 Access to Life Skills and Careers III
20.01951 Access to Life Skills and Careers IV
20.01450
• Essential knowledge, skills, and behaviors students need to live successfully in
today’s world.
– Decision-making process:
– Examining life roles and responsibilities as a family member and individual,
– Building interpersonal and communication skills;
– Employability skills;
– Balancing career and family;
– Career exploration and development;
– Goal setting;
– Self-advocacy;
– Managing personal resources
Electives
•
•
•
•
20.01550 Access to Family, Community, and Careers I
20.01650 Access to Family, Community, and Careers II
20.01750 Access to Family, Community, and Careers III
20.01850 Access to Family, Community, and Careers IV
• Skills, attitudes, and behaviors students need to live successfully in
today’s world.
– Problem-solving skills
• Planning process applied to life situations such as
–
–
–
–
assessing career plans,
goal setting,
self advocacy,
managing multiple roles and responsibilities,
– Planning resources to meet individual and family needs including
• Consumer decisions about food, clothing, shelter, care-giving, health care,
and transportation.
• Consumer decisions are evaluated according to their relationship to:
– community roles and responsibilities of families and individuals,
– the relationship of technology to consumer resources, and
– environmental impact of consumer decisions.
Electives
• 20.43050
Access to Consumer Economics
– GPS Standards FCS-CF (CTAE Family and Consumer Sciences-Consumer Finance)
•
•
https://www.georgiastandards.org/standards/Georgia%20Performance%20Standards%20CTAE/Consumer_Finance030309.pdf
FCS-CF-4. Students will explain the processes involved in managing personal
finances.
a. Identify needs and wants.
b. Describe decision making steps relating to financial needs and wants.
• 20.41650 Access to
Food, Nutrition, and Wellness
– GPS Standards FCS-FNW (CTAE Family and Consumer Sciences-Food Nutrition and
Wellness)
•
•
https://www.georgiastandards.org/standards/Georgia%20Performance%20Standards%20CTAE/Food_Nutrition_Wellness030309.pdf
FCS-FNW-10. Students will demonstrate safe food sanitation procedures.
b. Practice and apply proper hand washing techniques using soaps, hand sanitizers, and
personal hygienic techniques such as hand, nail, and hair care.
Electives
• 32.43350 Access to Workplace Readiness
– basic skills, thinking skills and personal qualities
e.g.
• self-esteem, responsibility and self-management; covers
communications, mathematics, creative decision making
and problem solving.
• 32.81150 Access to
Career Technical Instruction I
• vocational skills and transition activities
• 53.01450 Access to
•
Music Appreciation I
53.02450 Access to Music History and Literature
Access Course Descriptions--Example
• This course is aligned to US History (45.08100) and gives students
access to the examination of the history of the United States
beginning with the British settlement of North America. The
course’s main focus is the development of the United States in the
20th and 21st centuries. The course includes topics related to
Colonization through the Constitution; New Republic to
Reconstruction; Industrialization, Reform, and Imperialism;
Establishment as a World Power; and the Modern Era. All
instruction (utilizing assistive technology as needed) should embed
the mastery of IEP goals and objectives so that skills are not
developed in isolation, but within the context of the course
content. Related skills for independent living, employment and
self-determination are developed within the course content. THIS
COURSE MUST REFLECT THE GEORGIA PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
and is intended only for students who are assessed using the
Georgia Alternate Assessment.
Course Standards
• Use same standards as corresponding general
education course
• Choose standards that are relevant for the student
• Teach standards at an access or prerequisite skill level
• IEP objectives should address skills needed to access the
standards
• Communication—receptive, expressive
• Cognitive skills e.g. counting, sorting, classification, etc.
• Manipulation of materials
– Life skills, vocational, leisure and relevant skills not
included in academic courses can be taught and
addressed in the remaining elective courses.
– A student may take a general education elective
course if they are addressing the standards and
curriculum of that course.
Schedules
• Course schedule is documentation of enrollment to provide
access to the course—the “registrar’s schedule”
Course Schedule
• Daily classroom schedule integrates
instruction in both access content and
relevant skills
• Community based instruction—consumer and
vocational training is essential
• Integration with general education peers
desirable
Integrating School day with the GPS, and IEP, and Relevant Skills
Scheduled
Activities
Georgia Performance
Standards
IEP Objectives
Standards Based Objectives
Life Skills Objectives
Arrival—Greetings, Share
news from home,
schedule
Language Arts, Reading,
Writing
Communication,
choice making,
Follow daily schedule
Taking off Coat
Toileting
A.M. Group Activity
Participate in reading a
story, activities, answering
Science, Language Arts,
Social Studies, Math
Answering questions,
making choices,
increasing vocabulary,
counting,
Mobility
Positioning
Taking Turns
Morning Snack—Choose
snack, prepare food, eat
Language Arts: acquire
new vocabulary,
Mathematics (algebra),
Social Studies, Science
choice making,
reading(recipe),
counting, 1:1
correspondence
Eating/Feeding
Handwashing
Toileting
Community Based
Skills—
Trip to Wallyworld to
purchase items for home
and school,
Work site
Language arts—making a
list,
Learning new vocabulary,
Mathematics (money
calculations)
Social studies, Economics
Making choices,
Making a list,
Finding Item in store,
matching objects,
Paying for item, grasp
and release
Mobility
Self Care Skills
Social skills
Adaptive P.E. I
Language Arts, Math
Communication, Choice
making, Counting
Mobility
Taking turns,
Leisure skills, e.g.
bowling, ball play
comprehension questions,
Instruction
• Includes both access to the standards and
relevant life skills instruction
• Should link academics to relevant life skills
and experiences
• Should consider standards and elements that
can have meaning to students.
• Embeds IEP objectives into context of GPS
• Increases awareness, vocabulary, and
interests that can in turn increase leisure
interests and skills
Instruction
Relevant
Life Skills
Georgia
Performance
Standards
Instruction should Link Skills
Life
Experiences
Relevant
Life Skills
Leisure
Academics
Choose Standards/Elements that can
have Meaning and Relevance
• What would you choose?
– SSUSH19 The student will identify the origins, major developments,
and the domestic impact of World War II, especially the growth of the
federal government.
• a. Explain A. Philip Randolph's proposed march on Washington, D.C. and
President Franklin D. Roosevelt's response.
– SSUSH5 The student will explain specific events and key ideas that
brought about the adoption and implementation of the United States
Constitution.
• d. Analyze how the Bill of Rights serves as a protector of individual and
states rights.
Use the content of the
standard/element to illustrate a
relevant activity
• Tell a story that can relate to a life lesson
– SSUSH2 c. Identify Benjamin Franklin as a symbol
of social mobility and individualism.
– Relates to transition planning, self determination,
US History: Benjamin Franklin
And Self-Determination
SSUSH2 The student will trace the ways that the economy and society of British North
America developed.
c. Identify Benjamin Franklin as a symbol of social mobility and individualism.
No!
Ben Franklin—US History –Kayse Harshaw, GaDOE
Do
Something!
Be
Someone!
What can the student do to move himself from being a student to a worker?
What are good work readiness skills and work habits?
What does the student want to do when he gets out of school?
Ben Franklin—US History & Self Determination–Kayse Harshaw, GaDOE
Access through Assistive
Technology
•
•
•
•
Reading the Standards and
Elements
What is the main or “big” idea?
What is the verb?
What student performance is required?
IEP objectives are skills needed to access the
standards
–
–
–
–
–
–
Communication
Building vocabulary
Placing materials
Counting
One to One correspondence
Writing
Reading the Standards
• ELA10LSV1
• Grade: 10
• Description: ELA10LSV1 The student participates in
student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal
interactions. The student
a. Initiates new topics in addition to responding to adultinitiated topics.
b. Asks relevant questions.
c. Responds to questions with appropriate information.
d. Actively solicits another person’s comments or opinion.
e. Offers own opinion forcefully without domineering.
f. Contributes voluntarily and responds directly when solicited
by teacher or discussion leader.
This is not a worksheet activity!!!!
Reading the High School
Standards
All high school ELA standards are organized within the
following strands:
–
–
–
–
–
Reading and Literature (RL)
Reading Across the Curriculum (RC)
Writing (W)
Conventions (C)
Listening, Speaking, and Viewing (LSV)
· ELA numbers identify the strands;
ELA9RL1
(ELA)English Language Arts, (9)9th grade, (RL)Reading and
Literature, (1)Standard 1.
Reading the High School ELA
Standards
• Critical Components of a standard:
– For example, ELA9RL1, which focuses on
comprehension, includes one critical component for
each of four genres of literature:
• fiction, nonfiction and informational materials,
poetry, and dramatic literature.
• The elements for each critical component (measurable
performance criteria ) are delineated under that critical
component by lower case letters.
ELA Organization
• Strands (RL, RC, W, LSV)
– Standards
• Critical components (optional)
– 4 genres of literature
» Elements
• Strand
– Standard
• Element
ELA9RL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (e.g., diction, imagery, point of view,
figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (e.g.,
poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for
interpretation.
Elements:
Critical Component: student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the structures and elements of fiction and
provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:
a. Locates and analyzes such elements in fiction as language (e.g., diction, imagery, symbolism, figurative language),
character development, setting and mood, point of view, foreshadowing, and irony.
b. Identifies and analyzes patterns of imagery or symbolism.
c. Relates identified elements in fiction to theme or underlying meaning.
Critical Component: The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the purpose, structure, and elements of
nonfiction and/or informational materials and provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:
a. Analyzes and applies knowledge of the characteristics of memoir, biography, and/or autobiography.
b. Analyzes and explains the purpose, structure, and elements of nonfiction works, including memoir, biography, and
autobiography.
c. Analyzes and evaluates the effects of language (e.g., diction, imagery, symbolism, figurative language), structure,
point of view, and selection of details in memoir, biography, and/or autobiography.
Critical Component: The student identifies and responds to differences in style and subject matter in poems by a variety
of contemporary and canonical poets; the student:
a. and responds to the aesthetic effects of subject matter (e.g. topic, theme), sound devices (e.g., alliteration,
onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme), figurative language (e.g., personification, metaphor, simile, hyperbole), and structure
(e.g., fixed and free forms, rhymed and unrhymed, narrative and lyric) in a variety of poems.
b. Sorts and classifies poems by specified criteria (e.g., fixed and free forms, rhymed and unrhymed, narrative and lyric,
and/or universal themes and topics).
Critical Component: The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the themes, structures, and elements of
dramatic literature and provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:
a. Identifies and analyzes types of dramatic literature (e.g., Shakespearean tragedy and comedy).
b. Analyzes the characters, structures, and themes of dramatic literature.
c. Identifies and analyzes dramatic elements, (e.g., exposition, rising action, climax, denouement, dialogue, monologue,
soliloquy, aside, dramatic
d. Identifies and analyzes how dramatic elements support and enhance interpretation of dramatic literature.
Access to Mathematics Standards
• Reading the standards:
–
–
–
–
–
Numbers and Operations (N)
Geometry (G)
Algebra (A)
Data Analsis and Probability (D)
Process Standards (P)
• Math Frameworks---finding the “big” picture
– Models of Instructions
– Sample Tasks
Looking at the BIG picture
•
•
•
•
•
MM2G1
Grade: 9,10,11,12
Description: MM2G1. Students will identify and use special right triangles.
Elements:
a. Determine the lengths of sides of 30°-60°-90° triangles.
b. Determine the lengths of sides of 45°-45°-90° triangles.
• Do they need to know square root sign before
they can get access to the information?
Finding the Mathematics Frameworks:
Click on the “Learning Village”
https://www.georgiastandards.org
Math II in “Hot Topics”
Mathematics –Adding Polynomials
MM1A2—Students will simplify and operate with radical
expressions, polynomials, and rational expressions.
c. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide polynomials
Pre-requisite skill—substituting values into expressions
But what if
you need to
make
S’Mores for 3
friends?
=6
=9
=3
3(2x) + 3(3y) + 3(1z) = 3 S'Mores!
Mathematics materials created by Kayse Harshaw, GaDOE,2008
• MM1A1. Students will explore and interpret the
characteristics of functions, using graphs, tables, and simple
algebraic techniques.
• h. Determine graphically and algebraically whether a function
has symmetry and whether it is even, odd, or neither.
Work Page
Symmetrical
Print and laminate for each student.
Symmetrical
Created by Janice Pickett, Bibb County
• MM1A1. Students will explore and interpret the characteristics of
functions, using graphs, tables, and simple algebraic techniques.
a. Represent functions using function notation.
b. Graph the basic functions f(x) = xn where n = 1 to 3, f(x) = , f(x) = , and
f(x) = 1/x.
c. Graph transformations of basic functions including vertical shifts,
stretches, and shrinks, as well as reflections across the x- and y-axes.
[Previewed in this unit.]
d. Investigate and explain the characteristics of a function: domain, range,
zeros, intercepts, intervals of increase and decrease, maximum and
minimum values, and end behavior.
e. Relate to a given context the characteristics of a function, and use
graphs and tables to investigate its behavior.
f. Recognize sequences as functions with domains that are whole
numbers.
• Prerequisite: recognize a function as a correspondence between inputs
and outputs where the output for each input must be unique.
• That is, if for each value of x, there is only one value of y!
Function
• Mathematics I
• Access to Consumer Economics
• Access to Food, Nutrition, and Wellness
Or, fx=x
Math: The Cola is the constant—
What do you get back when you buy the soda?
Every value of x (the money you put in the
machine) has a discreet value for y—the money
you get out of the machine
Consumer Economics: Should you bring your
snack or buy from the machine?
Food, Nutrition and Wellness: What are the
choices to buy that would be more nutritious?
Variations
Student picks up dollar, helps to put it in vending machine. “What did you get?”
Places coke and picks up (or is handed) change. Student drops change in tray.
Math II
• Type of function tasks from Math I are still
appropriate for Math II.
– Always raise level of expectations!
• Math II Frameworks
– Focus on Units 1-4
– Unit 1—Making a box to hold the most chocolates
• Math I garden fence task is a pre-requisite
• Progresses from area to volume
– How many chocolates will the box hold?
– What if it there are two layers?
• Unit 2—Right Triangles
• How tall is the building?
• Comparing angles for taller and shorter items.
– Making a ramp for cars or bocce ball
Math II
• Unit 3--Circles and Spheres
– Math_II_Unit03Circles_TE[1].doc
• Oranges and pizzas!
• Unit 4—
– Comparing survey data
Resources for 10th Grade
• Access materials being developed summer of 2009 for the
following courses:
– Language Arts
• 23.06250 Access to 10th Grade Literature/Composition
– Mathematics
• 27.08250 Access to Mathematics II
– Science:
• 26.06150 Access to Environmental Science
• 40.01150 Access to Physical Science
– Social Studies
•
•
•
•
45.08350 Access to World History
45.05750 Access to American Government/Civics (1/2 Credit)
45.06150 Access to Economics/Business/Free Enterprise (1/2 Credit)
45.07150 Access to World Geography
• These will be posted to the resource board by the beginning of
the 2009-2010 school year
http://admin.doe.k12.ga.us/gadoe/sla/agps.nsf
Email Kayse Harshaw ([email protected]) or Toni Bowen ([email protected])
to obtain a password.
Planning activities aligned to the
standards
• Divide into groups
• Choose a standard/element
• Design an activity/task that has relevance to
the student and is aligned to the
standard/element
• Describe materials
• Generalization
• Assistive technology
Division of Special Education Services and
Supports
Georgia Department of Education
For Additional Information Contact
Kayse Harshaw
[email protected]
• http://www.physics.brown.edu/physics/demo
pages/Demo/solids/demos/1d6040.html
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Giving “Access” to the Access Courses