Reading, Math, and Science in
the Arts Classroom
Effective Strategies for Teaching
Non-Art Anchors
Purpose
• To demonstrate the use of reading, math, and
science anchors connected to arts instruction
• To offer applicable and effective
strategies for including reading, math, and science
instruction in the arts classroom
Referencing Standards
keyarts.wikispaces.com
“Resources” (left menu)
Arts and Humanities Standards
“the anchors can be found here”
use this link –Reading, Math, Science
Keyarts.wikispaces.com
• Arts & Humanities Standards
9.1 Production, Performance
9.3 Critical Response
• Materials & methods, Elements/Principles
9.2 Historical / Cultural Context
Reading, Science
& Math CATEGORIES
• Math Standards (anchors)
M.A – Numbers & operations
M.B - Measurement
• Ruler, protractor, compass
M.C - Geometry
•
Area, volume, shape properties
M.D – Algebraic concepts
M.E. – Data analysis &
probability
9.4 Aesthetic Response
Reading Standards (anchors)
R.A – Comprehension and Reading Skills
R.B – Interpretation & analysis of Fiction &
Non-fiction
Science Standards (anchors)
S.A - Nature of Science
• Setting up experiments
S.B. – Biological Sciences
S.C. – Physical Sciences
S.D. – Earth Sciences
S4.A The Nature of Science
Reporting Category
ASSESSMENT ANCHOR
S4.A.1
Reasoning and Analysis
ELIGIBLE CONTENT
S4.A.1.1 Identify and explain the application of
scientific, environmental, or technological
knowledge to possible solutions to problems.
Reference: 3.2.4.A, 3.2.4.C, 3.8.4.C
S4.A.1.3 Recognize and describe change in
natural or human-made systems and the possible
effects of those changes.
Reference: 3.1.4.C, 3.1.4.E, 4.7.4.B, 4.8.4.A,
4.8.4.C
S4.A.1.1.1 Distinguish between a scientific fact and
an opinion, providing clear explanations that connect
observations and results (e.g., a scientific fact can be
supported by making observations).
S4.A.1.1.2 Identify and describe examples of
common technological changes past to present in
the community (e.g., energy production,
transportation, communications, agriculture,
packaging materials) that have either positive or
negative impacts on society or the environment.
S4.A.1.3.1 Observe and record change by using
time and measurement.
S4.A.1.3.2 Describe relative size, distance, or
motion.
S4.A.1.3.3 Observe and describe the change to
objects caused by temperature change or light.
S4.A.1.3.4 Explain what happens to a living
organism when its food supply, access to water,
shelter, or space is changed (e.g., it might die,
migrate, change behavior, eat something else).
S4.A.1.3.5 Provide examples, predict, or describe
how everyday human activities (e.g., solid waste
production, food production and consumption,
transportation, water consumption, energy
production and use) may change the environment.
Reading in the arts
Part One
Why Read?
Robert Marzano says the best schools involve
students in a program of wide reading that
emphasizes vocabulary development;
Reading opportunities each day
in different subject areas more than double a
students’ exposure to vocabulary words.
How do I get students to
understand what they read?
If students are to understand content area
readings, they must imPRES.
–
–
–
–
Predict
Retell
Explain (clarify)
Summarize
These four steps help to create engaged students!
Effective Strategies to aid
student comprehension
• Anticipation guides
• Cloze reading passage for comprehension
and vocabulary development (leaving blanks)
• Word activities and cooperative learning
– Word walls
– Semantic webs and word sorts (roots &
languages)
• Paraphrasing
Anticipation & Vocab guide- examples
What I Know
What I think I
might
means: know –
not sure of.
VALUE
smooth
hatched
VALUE means:
cross/hatch creative
Value is relative:
Start with lighter shades here.
Value is relative:
Smooth hatched cross/hatch creative
Light is reflected off
objects.
Light is reflected
off objects.
Shading is:
Shading is:
Chiaroscuro is:
Chiaroscuro is:
Layer marks.
Questions that I would like to
Place marks closer
know the answers to.. together.
Charcoal smears
well.
Marks that can be made when
shading are of an unlimited variety.
An eraser can be
used to draw lighter
areas.
Reading: The Visual Experience, 2nd Edition,
Chapter 6, pages 56-61.
Use when listening to music, watching
dance, or observing visual art pieces.
Layer marks.
Distance marks –
closer or farther
apart.
Charcoal smears
well.
An eraser can be
used to ‘draw’ a
line.
Reading: The visual Experience,
2nd Edition, Chap. 6, pgs 56-61
Framework for lesson planning
Before During After Reading
• Before Reading
– Activating background knowledge
– Setting a purpose for reading
– Predicting text content
– Reviewing and clarifying vocabulary
• During Reading
–
–
–
–
–
Establish the purpose for each part of the reading
Self-monitoring – (notes, idea sketches) – vocabulary clarification
Visualizing – (dance moves, vocal/instrumental sounds, imagery)
Summarizing --Identifying and clarifying key ideas
Questioning self – finding relevancy and relationship to the arts
application.
• After Reading
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Assessing if purpose of reading was met
Paraphrasing important information
Identifying the main idea and details
Making comparisons
Connecting – relevancy to your class
Drawing conclusions
Summarizing
Analyzing
USING this information in class or project
Pillow Project--Symbol as
Proverb
This symbol represents the idea that
one must take from the past what is
good and bring it into the present in
order to make positive progress
through the benevolent use of
knowledge. It can be represented by a
bird with its head turned backwards
taking an egg off its back. Sankofa is
actually an Akan word meaning go
back and take. Sanko- go back, fatake. This idea has since been
adopted by other tribes in the area and
other cultures around the world.
Students read explanations for many symbols. – Akan, Ukranian, Native American
keyarts.wikispaces.com
• R11.A.2.1
Identify and apply meaning of
vocabulary in nonfiction
• R11.A.2.4
Identify and explain main ideas and
relevant details in nonfiction
• Vocabulary identified was placed on a
word-wall.
• Related/similar symbols were grouped
• R.11.A.2.5
Summarize a nonfictional text as a
whole.
• Use paraphrasing to
– Assess understanding
– Draw conclusions
– Connect learning
I had students
•
•
•
•
•
Choose five symbols from the reading- sketch & paraphrase their meaning.
Create their own symbols (3) (visual arts) – synthesize meaning
Write about the meaning of their personal symbols
Use their symbols in a pillow design (batik technique)
Orally explain the symbolic relationships to the class.
For the music class
• Notes are a symbol
system- an alphabet.
• Their placement is
meaningful on the staff,
and spacing is
meaningful.
• Reading this new
language, as well as
about its development.
• VOCABULARY
For the Dance or theatre class
• Body positions
• Body placement in
relationship to others,
or on stage.
• VOCABULARY
dance history – Martha Graham
stage craft – the Globe
Why Reading and Writing?
• "The language arts - Reading, Writing, Speaking
and Listening - are unique because they are
processes that students use to learn and make
sense of their world.
• Students do not read "reading"; they read about
history, science, mathematics and other content areas
as well as about other topics for their interest and
entertainment.
• Similarly, students do not write "writing"; they use
written words to express their knowledge and ideas and
to inform or entertain others.
Because of the unique nature of the language arts, all teachers in the
school will use the Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening standards.
From the Pennsylvania Code, Title 22, section 4.83
Science in the Arts
Part Two
Keyarts.wikispaces.com
Science Standards (anchors)
S.A - Nature of Science
• Setting up experiments
S.B. – Biological Sciences
S.C. – Physical Sciences
S.D. – Earth Sciences
• Arts and Humanities Standards
9.1 Production, Performance
9.3 Critical Response
• Materials & methods, Elements/Principles
9.2 Historical / Cultural Context
9.4 Aesthetic Response
Four by Five foot canvas panels – Illustrating the effects of
gravity and force on paint… Five Third Grade classes used
sponges, balls, mops, turkey basters, and more – never
touching the canvas, but allowing gravity to work for them.
Science Fair Art
Students created these group images
with the art teacher.
In regular class, students set up
experiments holding eye droppers at
different heights and then allowing
paint to drip – studying gravity.
They then measured the splat
differences and graphed the results!
And then ‘named’ the art…
Brucie Holler: Hilton Head, South Carolina
S4.A The Nature of Science
Reporting Category
ASSESSMENT ANCHOR
S4.A.1
Reasoning and Analysis
ELIGIBLE CONTENT
S4.A.1.1 Identify and explain the application of
scientific, environmental, or technological
knowledge to possible solutions to problems.
Reference: 3.2.4.A, 3.2.4.C, 3.8.4.C
S4.A.1.3 Recognize and describe change in
natural or human-made systems and the possible
effects of those changes.
Reference: 3.1.4.C, 3.1.4.E, 4.7.4.B, 4.8.4.A,
4.8.4.C
S4.A.1.1.1 Distinguish between a scientific fact and
an opinion, providing clear explanations that connect
observations and results (e.g., a scientific fact can be
supported by making observations).
S4.A.1.1.2 Identify and describe examples of
common technological changes past to present in
the community (e.g., energy production,
transportation, communications, agriculture,
packaging materials) that have either positive or
negative impacts on society or the environment.
S4.A.1.3.1 Observe and record change by using
time and measurement.
S4.A.1.3.2 Describe relative size, distance, or
motion.
S4.A.1.3.3 Observe and describe the change to
objects caused by temperature change or light.
S4.A.1.3.4 Explain what happens to a living
organism when its food supply, access to water,
shelter, or space is changed (e.g., it might die,
migrate, change behavior, eat something else).
S4.A.1.3.5 Provide examples, predict, or describe
how everyday human activities (e.g., solid waste
production, food production and consumption,
transportation, water consumption, energy
production and use) may change the environment.
S4.C Physical Sciences
Think
DANCE!
Reporting
Category
ASSESSMENT ANCHOR
S4.C.3 Principles of Motion and Force
ELIGIBLE CONTENT
S4.C.3.1 Identify and describe different
types of force and motion resulting from these
forces, or the effect of the interaction between
force and motion.
Reference: 3.4.4.C, 3.6.4.C, 3.2.4.B
S4.C.3.1.1 Describe changes in motion caused
by forces (e.g., magnetic, pushes or pulls, gravity,
friction).
S4.C.3.1.2 Compare the relative movement of
objects or describe types of motion that are
evident (e.g., bouncing ball, moving in a straight
line, back and forth, merry-go-round).
S4.C.3.1.3 Describe the position of an object by
locating it relative to another object or a stationary
background (e.g., geographic direction, left, up).
Percussion: Gravity plays a role – in timpani you work with it.
Force variations change sound.
Science, grade 4, category C
ASSESSMENT ANCHOR
S4.C.2 Forms, Sources, Conversion, and Transfer of Energy
ELIGIBLE CONTENT
basic
energy
S4.C.2.1 S4.C.2.1
RecognizeRecognize
basic energy
types
and
types
and
sources,
or
describe
how
energy
can
sources, or describe how energy can be changed from
be
changed
from
one
form
to
another.
one form to another.
Reference:
3.4.4.B, 3.4.4.C
Reference:
3.4.4.B, 3.4.4.C
Music
S4.C.2.1.1
Identify
energy
forms,
energy
S4.C.2.1.1
Identify
energy
forms,
energy
transfer, and
transfer,
and
energy
examples
(e.g.,
light, heat,
energy examples (e.g., light, heat, electrical).
electrical).Describe the flow of energy through an
S4.C.2.1.2
S4.C.2.1.2
Describe
the flow
of energy
object
or system
(e.g., feeling
radiant
heat through
from a light
an
object
or
system
(e.g.,
feeling
radiant
heatto light a
bulb, eating food to get energy, using a battery
from
a
light
bulb,
eating
food
to
get
energy,
using
bulb or run a fan).
a
battery
to
light
a
bulb
or
run
a
fan).
S4.C.2.1.3 Recognize or illustrate simple direct current
S4.C.2.1.3
Recognize
illustrate simple
directlight
series
and parallel
circuitsor
composed
of batteries,
current
series
and
parallel
circuits
composed
bulbs (or other common loads), wire, and on/off of
batteries, light bulbs (or other common loads),
switches.
wire, and on/off switches.
Dance
S4.C.2.1.4 Identify characteristics of sound (e.g., pitch,
S4.C.2.1.4
Identify characteristics of sound (e.g.,
loudness,
reflection).
pitch, loudness, reflection).
Acoustics – Sound travels in waves
Phasing delays in marching band
When tuning a guitar – sound travels in waves –
No waves = in-tune.
Standards & anchors
Content Indicators
Process Indicators
S4A.1.3.1 – observe
and record change by
measurement
S4A Students
recognize and predict
resulting changes that
gravity and height
create in dripping
paint.
S4A Students design
& execute a scientific
study where they
measure splat
diameters from
varying heights.
Students analyze and
compare results.
Music, Dance, Visual Arts
& body systems
Math in the arts
Part Three
Keyarts.wikispaces.com
• Math Standards (anchors)
M.A – Numbers & operations
M.B - Measurement
• Ruler, protractor, compass
M.C - Geometry
•
Area, volume, shape properties
M.D – Algebraic concepts
M.E. – Data analysis & probability
• Art and Humanities Standards
9.1 Production, Performance
Response
9.3 Critical
• Materials & methods, Elements/Principles
9.2 Historical / Cultural Context
9.4 Aesthetic Response
ORIGAMI
Geometric Shapes make
complex color wheels
Right
Angle
Triangles
Connect
Creating
Star forms
Keyarts.wikispaces.com
(academic standards & anchors)
Math, Grade 6
M.6.B Measurement
Reporting Category
ASSESSMENT ANCHOR
M6.B.2
Apply appropriate techniques, tools and formulas to determine measurements.
ELIGIBLE CONTENT
M6.B.2.1
Choose or use appropriate tools and/or
units to determine measurements within the same
system.
M6.B.2.1.1 Use or read a ruler to measure to the nearest
1/16 inch or millimeter.
M6.B.2.1.2 Choose the more precise measurement of a
given object (e.g., smaller measurements are more
precise).
M6.B.2.1.3 Measure angles using a protractor up to 180
- protractor must be drawn - one side of the angle to be
measured should line up with the straight edge of the
protractor.
Concentrating on Fractions
Origami Envelope
1/4
ELIGIBLE CONTENT
M4.A.1.1.1 Write the
fraction or decimal,
including mixed numbers,
which corresponds to a
drawing or set – no
simplification necessary.
M4.A.1.1.2 Create a
drawing or set that
represents a given
fraction or decimal,
including mixed numbers.
Cut different sizes and colors or paper,
Have students arrange in rhythms.
1/8
Measuring Angles
Looking at local maps
M6.B.2.1.3 – Eligible
Content- Measuring
Angles
Hundertwasser“Eyebalance #5”
Kandinsky –
Contrasting sounds
Composition VIII
Mapping movements on a field, or in dance.
Artist Kay Rosen – using grids to visually map songs
Standards & anchors
Content Indicators
Process Indicators
M.6.B.1 Demonstrate an
understanding of
measurable attributes of
objects and figures, and the
units, systems and
processes of measurement.
M.6.B.1 Students will
understand how to
create scale models.
M.6.B.1 Students will
create a scale model of
the class timeline to be
presented in the room
M.6.D.1 Demonstrate an
understanding of patterns,
relations and functions.
students decide their scale
(e.g. 1 foot =100 years).
M.6.D.1 Students will
predict the timing of
future cultural
changes by
examining past
trends.
M.6.D.1 Students will
analyze the pattern of
past significant cultural
events & predict the year
when a significant future
event might occur.
Taken from : keyarts.wikispaces.com
Resources –Sample Units of Study, Governor’s Institute (GIAE 2008), Unit F
Reflection and Rotation of a
Circle Dissection
• Vocabulary
–
–
–
–
–
–
Circumference
Radius
Diameter
Vertex
Angle measures
Positive/Negative
Tools Used
- Compass
- Protractor
“Medieval
Books”
School Arts Magazine, Davis Publications,
January, 2005
Stained glass
Yarn painting
Dance choreography
Marching sections
Musical cannons and
repeats
Reflexive Mirroring Skills
Dance and Music – using the whole body !
Phrasing, repetition and pattern –
both musically and visually in music scores.
ELIGIBLE CONTENT
M6.D.1.1.1 Create, extend or find a
missing element in a pattern
Volume of art forms
Eligible Content
M11.B.2.2.2 Calculate the
volume of prisms, cylinders,
cones, pyramids and/or
spheres. Formulas are
provided on the reference
sheet.
David Smith
Human pyramid
Balance
Symmetry
Asymmetry
Form
Construction Assembly
Basic Ruler Measuring
Creating Grids
for pillow designs
4” x 4” squares
Lesson from Gov. Inst. 2006
VISUAL SIGNS in the Arts Classroom
Making the Natural connections
circumference
Parallelogram
Word Walls for VOCAB
Radius
Remember these:
www.keyarts.wikispaces.com
(lessons, standards/anchors)
www.artscienceresearchlab.org/
www.mathinmotion.org
(origami)
Additional lesson ideas at
Keyarts.wikispaces.com (2008 GIAE faculty presentations)
Reading and math strategies
[email protected]
__________________________________________
Your ‘To Do’ List
• Continue finalizing your rubric
• Familiarize yourself with reading, and
math anchors (keyarts.wikispaces.com)
• Identify READING and MATH anchors in
your content and process indicators and
list them in the Standards & Anchors
column (left column) on your lesson plan
By Feb 1 , 2009
grid.
st
Reading, Math, and Science in the Arts Classroom
Effective Strategies for Teaching Non-Art Anchors
Pennsylvania Department of Education
Intermediate Unit on-line workshop
Adapted from a presentation at PDE Governor’s Institute for Arts Educators - Summer 2008
Diane Wilkin
PAEA Secondary Division Director
Fine and Performing Arts Department
Harry S Truman High School, 3001 Green Lane, Levittown, PA 19057
215.547.3000 [email protected]
[email protected]
January 2009
English / Reading Components contributed by
James L. Hausman III
South Fayette High School, 3640 Oakdale Road, McDonald, PA 15057 412.221.4542 x8-678#
[email protected]
Standards and
Anchors
Content Indicators
Process Indicators
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Reading, Math, and Science in the Arts Classroom