Plantation Park
Singers
Orientation
10/3/2015
Nicole M. Greggs, Director/NBCTEMC/Music
Julie Gittelman, Principal
Carol King-Roberts, Asst. Principal
www.musicmakerscamp.com
1
Welcome to
Plantation Park
Singers!
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Agenda
1. Chorus Handbook
A. Registering & Donations
B. Responsibilities
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Attendance/Mrs. Greggs’ Contact Info.;
Uniforms/Uniform & Shoe Bank;
Music, CDs, & Musicianship Tests;
Procedures;
PPSBA;
Fundraising
C. Awards & Point System
D. Audience Etiquette
2. General Questions
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Mrs. Greggs’ Contact
Information:
• Email (preferred)[email protected] or
[email protected] or
[email protected]
• PPE phone- 754-323-7150 x325
• Cell phone (after hours)- 954-868-5515
• Please do NOT leave messages on school
phone.
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What is Chorus?
And Why Sing?
• Chorus is a fun, honorary, academic enrichment
program that teaches the whole child life skills
through beautiful singing in a large group.
• No heartbeat= no life.
• Singing naturally develops linguistic skills,
enhances reading ability, & strengthens crosscerebral synapses.
• Music provides a context for knowledge from all
areas- reading, math, science, social studies,
character, TRIBES agreements; sense of
community.
• It’s social and fun!
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Registering for PPE
Chorus
• Chorus Registration is exclusively online:
musicmakerscamp.com>PPE
Chorus>Auditioning & Registering
• $20 “Fair Share” registration donation, $15
per additional child if registering multiple
children
• $25 Uniform Rental Donation due ASAP,
or purchase (see info. Online)
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Chorister & Parent
Responsibilities
Attendance
• It’s not just a club! Mandatory rehearsalsChorus meets after school on Tuesdays and/or
Thursdays from 2:10-3:40pm. Most of the year
it’s 1 day per week on Thursday, but if Thursday
is early release or off, we’d meet that week on
Tuesday.
• We hold 2 Friday night Sing-a-Thon’s in
November and February, as well as winter and
spring concerts inwww.musicmakerscamp.com
December and May.
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Chorister & Parent
Responsibilities
Attendance
• We also take field trips and day trips.
• This year we are planning a trip to Music USA
Festival at Universal Studios Orlando, FL on Dec.
5, 2014!!! This is a music competition & the last
time we went we won 1st Place & GRAND
CHAMPION OVERALL for the whole festival!
• Excusal notes (written or emailed) within 2
rehearsals of absence;
• Tardies/ early dismissal also need notes;
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Chorister & Parent
Responsibilities
Uniforms & Uniform Bank
• Formal = dresses for girls, tux for boys;
fittings tonight from Bank; all payments for
new items due Oct. 16 (regular rehearsal);
• Uniform Bank has dresses, tux pants & shirts,
& shoes- please check to see if what we have
fits you before purchasing- see handbook for
costs
• Check online for specific details
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Chorister & Parent
Responsibilities
Uniforms & Uniform Bank
• Uniform checks- formal & informal, 25
points each.
• Cummerbunds & bowties are loaned to
boys for concerts & recollected
immediately after- should never go home
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Chorister & Parent
Responsibilities
Music & Practice CD’s
• Folders & music are loaned;
• Keep pencil in folder;
• Mark music in pencil only;
• Practice CD’s are to be used as study aids at
home in conjunction with music scores;
• Music returns in December & May,
• After check-in, fees may apply for
lost/damaged scores.
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Chorister & Parent
Responsibilities
Musicianship Tests
• Purpose is to foster musical growth and
excellence.
• Mrs. Greggs teaches material. Students take level
1 test at Fall Sing-a-Thon (study sheet is in chorus
folder);
• Those who score > or =90% go on to take level 2
test at spring Sing-a-Thon;
• Those who score < 90% retake level 1;
• Level 3 available for those who score >=90% on
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level 2;
Chorus Procedures
Rehearsal Schedules & Announcements
• Schedule is part of Handbook;
• December and Spring dates still being
negotiated;
• Check chorus website for latest
information: www.musicmakerscamp.com
• WOWL
• Chorus bulletin board
• ParentLink Calls/ emails
• Notices
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Chorus Procedures
Rehearsals
• No phone use (school or personal cell
phones);
• Arrive on time with folder, pencil, &
agenda;
• Use restrooms, eat snacks, & get drinks
before we begin;
• When warm-up’s start, all talking stops;
• TRIBES Agreements followed;
•10/3/2015
No rehearsal interruptions.
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Chorus Procedures
Dismissal
• EAST PARKING LOOP ONLY for pickup
(FRONT OF SCHOOL);
• All students will be dismissed out the Green
Gate door;
• Student names in car windshields speeds
pickup;
• Supervision provided 15-minutes post-rehearsal;
• Chronic late pickups will result in child being
regretfully removed from chorus.
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PPSBA
(Plantation Park Singers Booster Association)
• It’s our Chorus Booster group of parents;
• Handles non-musical aspects of running choir;
• Please donate 2 hours to help somehow- sign
up to assist on contracts;
• Chaperones for trips need level 2 clearance this
year- fingerprinting (self pay);
• EVERYONE please register to volunteer online
at www.getinvolvedineducation.com .
• Offices are open; will discuss during PPSBA
meeting following this powerpoint.
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Fundraising
• Chorus and PPSBA are financially self-sufficient;
• Mrs. Greggs volunteers her time as do all other
PPSBA volunteers;
• Fundraising pays for music, costumes,
clinicians, sets, awards, t-shirts, treats, music
equipment, etc.;
• Half of Sing-a-Thon pledges & certain other
fundraisers are credited to student accounts
toward uniforms and trip costs; remaining
proceeds cover awards & general chorus
expenses.
• All students are encouraged to help raise funds.
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Point System
ITEM/EVENT
POINTS
PERFORMANCE: Performance or Sing‐a‐Thon (per day)
+30 (0 if unexcused)
REHEARSAL: perfect day
+10 (0 if unexcused)
REHEARSAL: no pencil and/or agenda (or no recorder, when
counted)
+9
REHEARSAL: leaving for bathroom (supposed to go before
rehearsal)
+8
REHEARSAL: present/no notebook
+7
REHEARSAL: Late pick‐up (except 1st incident), Tardy to/leaving
early from
+6
REHEARSAL: talking/ off task
+5 (+1 if severe)
REHEARSAL: present but forgot to take nametag
+3
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Point System- cont.
ITEM/EVENT
POINTS
Rehearsal/performance: excused absence (notes or
FRP's due by 2nd rehearsal after absence)
Ex (event not counted)
Rehearsal/performance: unexcused absence (no
note provided or note for unacceptable reason)
+0
RESPONSIBILITY: Required forms/monies in on time
(per incident)
+ 5 per form (0 if late/
never returned)
RESPONSIBILITY: Prepared on Uniform Check Day
9includes shoes, socks, jeans, t-shirt, tux pants, tux
shirt, formal dress)
+25 or portion thereof (per
check)
EXTRA CREDIT/ SCHOLARSHIP: ’A’ Honor Roll
+25 (per quarter)
EXTRA CREDIT/ SCHOLARSHIP: A or B Honor Roll
+15 (per quarter)
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Point System-
cont
.
ITEM/EVENT
POINTS
EXTRA CREDIT: Voluntary music ensemble (orchestra,
church/temple choir, etc.) or private music lessons (must
complete during this school year & turn in program)
+ 15 per ensemble per
school year
EXTRA CREDIT/SCHOLARSHIP: Musicianship tests‐
passing grade of 90% or more
+15 pts per level
NOT FOR GRADE/RESPONSIBILITY: Sing‐a‐Thon:
pledge goal met
+10
EXTRA CREDIT/ LEADERSHIP: Voluntary vocal solo/
announcer/ special part
+5 per event
EXTRA CREDIT/ LEADERSHIP: Helps Mrs. Greggs after
rehearsal
+2 per day
EXTRA CREDIT/ LEADERSHIP: serves as chorus officer
or section leader
+15 per year
NOT FOR GRADE‐ PPSBA Meeting‐ parent in attendance
+5
NOT FOR GRADE‐ PPSBA‐ parent volunteers in rehearsal
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OR
chaperones trip
+ 5 per day
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End-of-Year Awards
• First, Second, & Third Year Achievement Awards
• Perfect Attendance Award
• Outstanding Attendance Award
• Outstanding Leadership Award
• Outstanding Responsibility Award
• Musicianship Test Certificates
• Most Outstanding 3rd, 4th, & 5th‐Grade Awards
• Most Improved Chorister
• Most Outstanding Overall Chorister
• Certificates of Appreciation
• Outstanding Entertainer
Awards
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2007-2008 12th Grade Cohort
Fine Arts Enrollment
• For the general population, the more music and
arts classes taken, the higher the student
achievement in all measures
• For students on “free and reduced lunch,” an
indicator of socioeconomic levels, the more
music and arts classes taken, the higher the
student achievement in all measures.
• For students divided by ethnicity, the more music
and arts classes taken, the higher the student
achievement in all measures.
• The more arts classes taken, the less likely a
student is to dropout of the cohort group.
Cumulative GPA
3.2
3.1
3
Visual Art
2.9
Dance
2.8
Drama
2.7
Music
2.6
2.5
4 or more
credits
3 - 2.5
credits
2-1.5 credits 1 - .5 credit
No arts
credits
% Of Students Failing to Graduate with Cohort
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
Dance
Drama
Music
Visual Art
4 or more
credits
3 - 2.5
credits
2-1.5
credits
1 - .5 credit
No arts
credits
SAT Math Scores (Mean)
560
540
Visual Art
520
Drama
500
Music
480
460
4 or more
credits
3 - 2.5
credits
2-1.5 credits 1 - .5 credit
No arts
credits
SAT Verbal (Mean)
580
560
540
Visual Art
520
Drama
500
Music
480
460
4 or more
credits
3 - 2.5
credits
2-1.5 credits 1 - .5 credit
No arts
credits
Level 3 and Above: FCAT Reading
70%
60%
50%
Visual Art
40%
Dance
30%
Drama
20%
Music
10%
0%
4 or more
credits
3 - 2.5
credits
2-1.5
credits
1 - .5 credit
No arts
credits
Score 3.5 and Above: FCAT Writing
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Visual Art
Dance
Drama
Music
4 or more
credits
3 - 2.5
credits
2-1.5
credits
1 - .5 credit
No arts
credits
Low Socio-Economic Group:
Cumulative GPA
Low Socio Economic: % Taking SAT
Low Socio Economic: SAT Scores
Music only
Low Socio-Economic: FCAT %
Music only
Cumulative GPA: Race
Music only
% Taking SAT (Verbal or Math): Race
Music only
Avg SAT Scores: Race
Music only
FCAT %: Race
Music only
FCAT %: Race
Music only
FCAT %: Race
Music only
2007-2008 12th Grade Cohort
Fine Arts Enrollment
• For the general population, the more music
and arts classes taken, the higher the
student achievement in all measures.
• For students on “free and reduced lunch,” an
indicator of socioeconomic levels, the more
music and arts classes taken, the higher the
student achievement in all measures.
• For students divided by ethnicity, the more
music and arts classes taken, the higher the
student achievement in all measures.
• THE MORE ARTS CLASSES TAKEN, THE
LESS LIKELY A STUDENT IS TO DROPOUT
OF THE COHORT GROUP.
Resources
• 2007-2008 12th Grade Cohort – Fine Arts
Enrollment Data
• Secretary Arne Duncan’s letter
• All prior collected music and arts
resources
www.flmusiced.org
Plantation Park Elementary’s
Music Department
Objectives
• Benefits of Music
Education
• Music Education
Advocacy
• What Parents can do to
Encourage their
Children in Music
• How Music
Connects with Core
Subject AreasResearch and Ideas
that are used in the
Music Classroom
• Elementary Music
Education in
Broward County
Schools
IMPORTANCE OF MUSIC EDUCATION
Music Education Helps Develop:
•Hand-Eye Coordination
•Memory Skills
•Concentration
•Problem Solving Skills
•Teamwork
•Self-Confidence/Self Esteem
•Self-discipline/Perseverance
•Standards of Excellence
•Time Management Skills
4 Categories of Benefits for
Music Education
1.
2.
3.
4.
Success in Society
Success in School
Success in Developing Intelligence
Success in Life
•
1. Success in
Society
Every human culture
uses music to
communicate ideas
and ideals
• The arts are identified
as one of the six
basic academic
subject areas
students should study
to succeed in college
– Academic Preparation
for College: What
Students Need to
Know and Be Able to
Do, 1983 [still in use],
• The arts create jobs,
increase local tax
base, spur growth in
businesses (hotels,
restaurants), and
improve the quality of
life for our cities and
towns
– American Arts Alliance
Fact Sheet, October
1996
2. Success in School
• Students with music performance
or appreciation experience
scored higher on the SAT than
those not involved. How much
higher?
• 53 points higher on verbal and
39 points higher on math for
those involved in music
performance
• 61 points higher on the verbal
and 42 points higher on the
math for those involved in
music appreciation
– 1999 College-Bound
Seniors National Report:
Profile of SAT Program Test
Takers, The College
Entrance Examination
Board, Princeton, New
Jersey
• Students
participating in arts
programs in
selected elementary
and middle schools
in New York City
showed significant
increases in selfesteem and thinking
skills
– National Arts
Education
Research
Center, New
York University,
1990
3. Success in
Developing IntelligenceResearch Results
• Music training is superior
to computer instruction in
enhancing children’s
abstract reasoning skills,
those necessary for
learning math and
science
– Shaw, Rauscher, Levine,
Wright, Dennis, and
Newcomb
• Two Rhode Island schools
gave an enriched, sequential,
skill-building music program
which showed marked
improvements in reading and
math skills. Students in this
program who had started out
behind the control group
caught up to statistical equality
in reading, and pulled ahead in
math
– Gardiner, Fox, Jeffrey, and
Knowles
Success in Developing
Intelligence- Research
Results, Continued
• A study at the University
of California (Irvine)
showed that after eight
months of keyboard
lessons, preschoolers
showed a 46% boost in
their spatial reasoning IQ
– Rauscher, Shaw,
Levine, Ky, and
Wright
• Children given piano lessons
significantly improved in their
spatial-temporal IQ scores
(important for some types of
math reasoning) compared
to children who received
computer lessons, casual
singing, or no lessons
– Rauscher, F.H., Shaw,
G.L., Levine, L.J.,
Wright, E.L., Dennis,
W.R., and Newcomb,
R.
Success in Developing
Intelligence- Research
Results. Continued
•
An Auburn University study found
significant increases in overall selfconcept of at-risk children
participating in an arts program that
included music, movement,
dramatics, and art, as measured by
the Piers-Harris Children’s SelfConcept Scale
– N.H. Barry, Project
ARISE: Meeting the
needs of disadvantaged
students through the
arts
• A study at McGill University
found that pattern recognition
and mental representation
scores improved significantly
for students given piano
instruction over a three-year
period. They also found that
self-esteem and musical skills
measures improved for those
students
– Costa-Giomi, E.
4. Success in Life
• Opens doors that
help children
transition from
school into the world
around them-world
of work, culture,
intellectual activity,
and human
involvement
– Gerald Ford, former
President, United
States of America
• By studying music in
school, students have
the opportunity to build
on skills such as
communication,
creativity, and
cooperation. They
enrich their lives by
building on these skills
and seeing the world
from different
perspectives
– Michael E. DeBakey,
M.D., Leading Heart
What Can Parents
Do?
 Listen to music with your child from little on up-nursery rhymes,
folk songs, children’s songs
 Sing and play music with your child
 Go to concerts or watch concerts on television
 Encourage your child to participate in musical activities at school,
church, and home
 Listen and show enthusiasm for your child’s musical
achievements
 Attend your child’s school/church music programs
 Be active in your child’s everyday life
 Engage in musical activities with your child on the internet. There
are many interactive sites…
How Music Connects to
the Core Subject Areas
Research & Ideas Used in the
Music Classroom
Music and Math
• Spatial/temporal relationships in music exist
as pitch and rhythm patterns
• The cognitive skills used to process music
are used in math as well
• When singing on pitch: “Do” is less than “re”,
and “re” is less than “mi”. As students
develop these skills, it can help students
understand math concepts such as number
lines
» Gardiner, 1996
Music and Math
• 2nd and 3rd graders were taught
fractions using concept of
rhythmic notation-relationships
between different note values
• Peers received traditional fraction
instruction
• Students taught fractions using music
concept scored 100% higher on
fractions tests than those who learned
using the traditional method
» Rauscher, 1999
Music and Math
• Students use
• Musical notationaddition and
notes and rhythmssubtraction skills
are sets of graphs
when working with
measures and
beats-ex: Creating
and/or completing
measures using
quarter, half, eighth
notes and their
respective number
of counts.
Music and Science
• Science and Sound
• Experiments on sound waves and
vibrations-using a rubber band plucked
between two fingers to show vibration.
• See salt move on a surface when sound
is made: Put plastic tightly over a coffee
can and secure with a rubber band.
Place salt on the plastic. Tap a smaller
can with a ruler to see the salt move.
The salt moves because the plastic is
vibrating due to the sound waves hitting
Music and Science
• Instruments and Science
• Size and Pitch:
–Large instruments have low
sounds
–Small instruments have high
sounds
–Using Boomwhackers (plastic
tubes that are pitched to certain
notes), you can build a pyramid to
visually show the students that to
support the pyramid, the large tube
must be on the bottom (and it
Music and Science
• Other interesting ideas:
• Glasses filled with different amounts of
water-have the students put them in
order from the lowest to the highest (the
lowest will be the one with the least
amount of water; the highest will be the
one with the most water-the instrument is
actually the air column created by the
space not filled up with water: smaller air
space = more water = higher sound
larger air space = less water = lower
sound
• There are numerous songs and
movement activities that have a science
Music and…..
Music and Social
Studies
• Happens often
when
teaching/learning
songs about:
•
•
•
•
Countries
Continents
States
Game songs from
other cultures
• Folk dances from
around the world
• While learning
these songs, we
also learn:
• Games
• Dances
• Instruments-both
American and
foreign
• Rhythms
• Songs in native
languages
• History of
American music
Music and...
Music and Reading
• Both music and
• Phonemic stage
reading rely on
of learning to
the discrimination
read is promoted
of sounds from
by good pitch
each other
discrimination
skills (learning
• When learning to
association
read, we learn
between visual
how to relate
parts of words
letters to their
and their spoken
spoken sounds
Music and Reading
Research
• Experimental group received Kodaly
training five days per week for 40
minutes during a seven-month period
• Control group received no special
music training
• Experimental group’s reading scores
were significantly higher (88th
percentile) than the control group’s
(72nd percentile)
Endless
Possibilities!!!
• Music is constantly connected
to the core subjects of
education
• By its nature, music education
naturally addresses all subject
areas!
Your Child’s Elementary
Music Education in the
Your child receives…
• Plantation Park
Elementary
School Grades
K-5~
– Music every 3 days for
30 minutes
• Bonus Classes on
PLC days using
reading/ music
connections
• The amount of
instructional time for
music varies from
school to school in
Broward County. This is
due to budget,
enrollment, number of
special subject areas,
and scheduling
challenges at each
location.
• Your school’s principal
makes decisions
regarding how much
music education the
Your Child Has the
Opportunity to:
• Learn how to sing
• Learn how to read
music
• Learn how to play
instruments
• Learn musical
games
• Learn dances
• Learn important
musical terms
• Perform for others
• Create rhythms,
melodies, and
dances
• Listen to music from
many cultures and
time periods
• Make instruments
• Show musical
expression
To Continue Improving
the Music Program, We
Need..
• Better Music Facilities~Currently many
music teachers do not have a room!
• Parents, Parents, Parents!~You are the
foundation of our program~Without your
support, our program could not succeed!
• Community Support~Our community needs
to be aware of our program, it’s successes,
and it’s needs.
Music Is…………
• Science~it is exact, specific, and
demands acoustics. Music scores are
graphs which indicate frequencies,
volume changes, melody, harmony, and
intensities all at once with exact control
of time
• Mathematical~it is rhythmically based on
subdivisions of time into fractions
• Foreign Language~terms are often in
Italian, German, or French. Notation is a
set of symbols used to represent ideas
that everyone, regardless of language
Music Is……..
• History~ reflects the times, country,
and origin of it’s creation
• Physical Education~ coordination of
eyes, hands, fingers, lips, voice,
facial, and diaphragm muscles in
response to the sounds heard and
interpreted
• Art~ Use all of the technical aspects
of music to create emotion and
beauty
Resources
Arts Improve Reading and Math. (n.d.). Retrieved February 16, 2002 from
http://www.bcmusiccoalition.org/resources/artsimprovereadmath.html
Campbell, D. (1996). Introduction to the Musical Brain. Saint Louis:
MMB Music, Inc.
Campbell, D. (2001). The Mozart Effect. New York: HarperCollins
Publishers
Campbell, D. (2000). The Mozart Effect for Children. New York:
HarperCollins
Publishers
Henriksson, L. Why Arts Education Matters. Retrieved February 2, 2002,
from
Resources cont.
Hopkins, G. (1999, March 15). Making the Case for Music Education.
Education
World. Retrieved December 1, 2001, from
http://www.education-world.com/a_curr/curr123.shtml
Music and Your Child. (n.d.). Retrieved February 17, 2002 from
http://www.coalitionformusiced.ca/yourchild.htm
Music and Literacy. (n.d.). Retrieved April 27, 2002 from
http://www.fresno.k12.ca.us/divdept/music/Literacy.htm
Music Education Facts and Figures. (n.d.). Retrieved February 16,
2002 from
http://www.menc.org/information/advocate/facts.html
Resources cont.
Weinberger, N. (n.d.). Music and the Brain. Retrieved February 16, 2002
from
http://www.bcmusiccoalition.org/resources/musicbrain.html
Weinberger, N. (1994). Music and Cognitive Achievement in Children.
MuSICA
Research Notes, V1, I2. Retrieved April 28, 2002 from MuSICA
Research notes
database.
Why Music? (n.d.). Retrieved February 16, 2002 from
http://www.musiceducationonline.org/links/why.html
Why Music Matters (n.d.). Retrieved February 16, 2002 from
PPSBA Meeting
• (THIS AGENDA COVERED 10/3/13)
• Welcome! Please sign in!
• Reports:
– President
– Vice-Presidents
– Treasurer
– Secretary
– Mrs. Greggs
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78
PPSBA Meeting
III.
Old Business
A.None at this time
IV.
New Business
A.
Need of the Month- please take an
item from the Giving Tree if you are willing.
Thank You!
B. Chorus Handbook, Schedule,
Contracts & Paperwork- Mrs. Greggs
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79
PPSBA Meeting
C. Chorus Uniforms
1.
Formal Uniform Check Day:
2.
Informal Uniform Check Oct. 11 at
Sing-a-Thon (jeans & t-shirts, no anklet
socks)
3.
Help needed with checking on all 3
days!
4. Uniform Bank, Costs, & Policies;
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80
PPSBA Meeting
D. Volunteering, Chaperone,
and Committees- STAR
procedures- Mrs. Greggs
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om
81
PPSBA Meeting
E.
Election and Installation of Officers- Proposed Slate for
2012-2013:
Co-President(s)- OPEN
Vice-President of Uniforms & Costumes- OPEN
Vice-President of Volunteers- OPEN;
Vice-President for Administration- OPEN
Vice-President for Supplies, Stage, & Props- OPEN
Vice-President for Fundraising- OPEN;
Vice-President for Music & Library- OPEN;
Secretary- Debbie Aurand;
Treasurer- OPEN;
Historian- CELIA SCHWAB;
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PPSBA Meeting
F. Ratification of 2013-2014 Proposed
Budget (see separate Word document)
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PPSBA Meeting
G. Fundraising
1. Proposed Fundraisers include:
a. Fall and Spring Sing-a-Thon’s (see
below)
b.
Spring Concert program book
Advertisement sales
c.
Family Nights
d.
Recorder sales
e.
Cookie Dough sales???
2. All fundraising events must be approved by
Ms. G before notifying parents.
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PPSBA Meeting
V.
Open Floor
VI.
Next PPSBA meeting
time = Thurs. Oct. 6 at 6:30pm in
the PPE cafeteria.
VII.
Adjournment
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THANK YOU!
What to do now?
•Complete your child’s online
registration
•Sign up for committees (please
duplicate or add to what you put on
your contract)
•Turn in your child’s Registration
donation
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