AEMP Grade Level Collaboratives
Module 5
Standard-based Teaching with Culturally
Responsive Text and Media
Office of Curriculum, Instruction, and School Support
Language Acquisition Branch
Academic English Mastery Program
Long Range Goals of the Eight
GLC Modules:
• Increase knowledge and awareness of what
authentic Culturally Relevant & Responsive
Educational (CRRE) Practices are
• Build an authentic culturally relevant and
responsive learning environment that teaches to
and through the strengths of our students
• Validate and affirm the legitimacy of each
student’s cultural and linguistic practices within
the learning process
GLC Module 5 Objectives:
• To demonstrate how to facilitate connections
between the students’ schema and seemingly
unfamiliar academic content through the use of
culturally responsive literature, text, and media
• To demonstrate how students can improve their
skills, motivation, and understanding of content
through a focus on the vital signs of literacy
development
• To build awareness of 21st education
technologies and the multiple literacy process
PD Norms for Success
• Participate 100% of the time
• Be mindful of others
-
Put electronics on vibrate or meeting mode
- -Be respectful of other’s opinions
• Listen with a different ear, an open mind, and a
receptive heart
Culturally Responsive Icebreaker
Vital Signs of Literacy Development
Source: Alfred Tatum, Reading for their Life: Rebuilding the Textual Lineages of African
American Males
Reading and
Writing
Readers and
Writers
Reading and
Writing Instruction
Educators’
Approaches
Providing the
Tools/Models
Improving the
Human Condition
Rescuing the
Significance of
Teaching
Interacting with
Students, not
Scorecards of
Achievement
(What)
(Why)
(How)
(Who)
•Word knowledge
•Fluency
•Strategy knowledge
•Writing language
Reading Gap
•Home Life
•Culture
•Environment
•Language
•Economics
Relationship Gap
•Quality Instructional
support
•Text
•Context
•Assessment
•Technology
Rigor Gap
•Competence
•Commitment
•Caring
•Culpability
Response Gap
Interactivity 1:The Mirror
Although I didn’t fully realize it at the time,
the vital signs of literacy development
informed my practice as a teacher of
adolescents. As an eighth grade teacher, I
resented the fact that my (African American)
boys made me an “at-risk teacher.” I was
“at-risk” of failing them if my teaching didn’t
enable them to absorb the curriculum. To
solve my “at-riskness,” I had to care about
my students despite their underperformance
on reading related tasks, the tough exterior
they projected, their adolescent immaturity,
the resistance they displayed, and the
challenges they posed to my teaching. I had
to study and work hard to provide
responsive instruction-Alfred Tatum, Ph.D.
-Dr. Alfred Tatum,
author of Reading for
their Life: Rebuilding
the Textual Lineages
of African American
Adolescent Males
Criteria for Selecting Enabling
Literature
1. The texts promote a healthy psyche.
2. They reflect an awareness of the real world.
3. They focus on the collective struggle of
African Americans, (Mexican Americans,
Hawaiian Americans, and Native
Americans).
4. They serve as a road map for being, doing,
thinking, and acting.
Adapted from Tatum, 2009
Criteria for Selecting Culturally
Relevant Literature & Text
• Captures students’ interest and motivates them to
read
• Enables students to use and transfer their knowledge
• Allows students to see themselves positively
• Affirms and validates their cultural identity
• Is culturally specific to a group
• Is written by authors who have an authentic inner
look to the culture. The deep experiences of a people
can seldom be told authentically from the outside
(Flor Ada, 2003)
Culturally Responsive
Enabling Literature
Incorporate a Variety of
Culturally Responsive Texts
21st Century Education and the Multiple Literacy
Process Model
What the Research Says
As we enter a new millennium, most people are by now
aware that we are in the midst of one of the most
dramatic technological revolutions in history that is
changing everything from the ways that we work,
communicate, and spend our leisure time. The
technological revolution centers on computer,
information, communication, and multimedia
technologies, is often interpreted as the beginnings of a
knowledge or information society, and therefore ascribes
education a central role in every aspect of life. This Great
Transformation poses tremendous challenges to
educators to rethink their basic tenets, to deploy the
media in creative and productive ways, and to restructure
schooling to respond constructively and progressively to
the technological and social changes that we are now
experiencing (Kellner 1998)
21st Century Education and the Multiple
Literacy Process Model
ECOLITERACY
CRITICAL
MULTICULTURAL
LITERACY
TRADITIONAL
LITERACY
ECONOMIC
LITERACY
MEDIA
LITERACY
Learning for Today’s Student
Our kids are connected. Technology is part of their
lives. But. . . . it’s not technology, it’s information.
These gadgets are their links to information. These
gadgets represent intellectual appendages to our
children. They are the hands and feet that carry
children to new experiences, and cutting these links
is like cutting an appendage - and that makes no
constructive sense to these children and their world
view. Yet we try to cut it off. . . .David Warlick
CYBERLITERACY
INTER-ACTIVITY 2:
What are our students talking
about?
143
1337
2moro
DBEYR
IRL
L8R
IIT
KFY
LYLAS
NALOPKT
B4N
LOL
NP
S2R
POS
TTYL
SITD
STBY
TMI
VBG
TYVM
MOOS
MHOTY
SMH
GR8
CD9
2NITE
OMG
RBTL
ROTFLMBO
WYCM
XOXO
*$
121
4COL
99
AIMB
AITR
BBT
BON
BNDN
CAS
CF
CIAO
CQRT
CUZ
FITB
FE
FOAF
H2S
13
INTER-ACTIVITY 2:
What are our students talking
about?
I love you
Elite(leet)
Tomorrow
Don’t believe
everything you
read
In real life
Later
Is it tight?
Kiss for you
Love you like a
sister
Not a lot of people
know that
Bye for now
Laughing out
loud or lots of
love
No problem
Send to receive
(pictures)
Parent over
shoulder
Talk to you later
Still in the dark
Sucks to be you
Too much
information
Very big grin
Thank you very
much
Member(s) of
the opposite sex
My hat’s off to
you
Shaking my
head
Great
Code 9 - Parents
around
Tonight
Oh My God
Read between
the lines
Rolling on the
floor laughing my
butt off
Will you call
me?
Hugs & Kisses
Starbucks
One to One
For crying out
loud
Parent is no
longer watching
As I mentioned
before
Adult in the
room
Be back
tomorrow
Believe it or not
14
Been nowhere,
Crack a smile
Coffee freak
Goodbye in
Security
Incorporate Culturally
Responsive Media
How to Access Social Media
Websites for Instructional Use
Interactivity 3: Culturally Responsive
Literature Text Analysis
Source: Dr. Letitia Johnson-Davis, Center for Culturally Responsive Teaching and Learning
What/whose
background,
experiences are
highlighted in
this selection?
How are cultures
represented in
this selection?
Is the selection
reflective of my
students’
backgrounds,
experiences
Based on
culturally
responsive
literature
analysis, which
selections need
to be enhanced,
augmented,
replaced, and
why?
How would you
use culturally
responsive
literature, text, or
media to
enhance or
augment the
selection?
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade K
Lesson Critique
To It
Theme: Stick
A little boy plants a carrot
seed. His family tells him it will
never grow, but the boy
doesn't listen. Day by day, he
cares for the seed, watering it,
and weeding around it, but day
after day, nothing grows.
Then, finally, a carrot comes
up--just...
18
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 1
Lesson Critique
The book isWeather
about the town of
“Chewandswallow,” where the
weather comes three times a day,
at breakfast, lunch, and dinner,
and is always food and
beverages. The rain is juice and
soup, the snow is ice cream, and
the wind brings hamburgers.
Because of this phenomenon,
there are no grocery stores.
However, when floods and storms
of giant food come, the population
is forced to leave
“Chewandswallow” on boats
made of bread, and adapt to their
new lives in the world where the
Theme:
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 2
Lesson Critique
Theme: Our Country and
Its People
From patriotic songs that stir the soul to
cowboy songs of early settlers, this is a
terrific collection of songs about America.
Children can learn as they hear “The Star
Spangled Banner,” the names of all the
states, and the Pledge of Allegiance.
Included are great quotes from great
Americans, a list of U.S. Presidents, plus
many interesting facts about our country.
There are songs inspired from the building of
our country---pioneer, cowboy, work,
railroad, and sea and river chanteys. All are
shared by a wonderful children’s choir
20
enhanced by adult voices on selected
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 3
Lesson Critique
Theme: Storytelling
A strong collection of 30 tales for beginning
storytellers, conveniently arranged according to the
difficulty of the telling. Among those included are
Aesop fables and such favorites as "Tilly," which is
designed to make an audience jump at the end. The
introductory material, written directly to student tellers,
contains advice on how to remember stories and
develop characters, along with tips on working out the
difficulties of telling stories to live audiences. Story
text, broken into segments, appears on one side of the
page, with suggestions for actions and gestures on the
other side. A few guidelines for adults--event planning
and handling stage fright, for example--are also
included. Source notes cite multiple variants for most
tales. Karen Morgan
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 4
Lesson Critique
Consequences
Theme: Risks and
“Sarah, Plain and Tall” is a tale set in the late 19th
century. It is about a widowed mid-western farmer with
two children, Anna and Caleb. The farmer advertises
for a wife. When Sarah arrives she is homesick for
Maine, especially for the ocean which she misses
greatly. The children fear that she will not stay, and
when she goes off to town alone, young Caleb, whose
mother died during childbirth, is stricken with the fear
that she has gone for good. But she returns with
colored pencils to illustrate for them the beauty of
Maine, and to explain that, though she misses her
home, "the truth of it is I would miss you more." The
tale gently explores themes of abandonment, loss and
love.
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 5
Lesson Critique
Theme: Cooperation &
Competition
Gary Soto is an acclaimed poet, essayist and fiction
writer. His writing is based upon his adventures as a
Mexican American boy growing up in Fresno, California.
He won the Before Columbus Foundation Award in 1985
for Living Up The Street, his first published book of
prose. His short story collection, Baseball In April, was
listed as one of the American Library Association's Best
Books for Young Adults. The streets and neighborhoods
of Fresno are an integral part of his writing. He has said,
"For me streets have always mattered. I conjure up inside
my head an image of our old street in south Fresno." The
area where he grew up was much like the barrios he
writes about complete with junkyards and big factories all
around. He is widely read by adults and young people.
Many of his stories and poems appear in language arts
textbooks across the nation, and several of his books
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 6
Lesson Critique
Perseverance
Theme:
"No one expected such a tiny girl to have a first
birthday," begins this inspiring biographical sketch of a
legendary track stars. Born in 1940 in Tennessee, the
chronically sickly though "lively" Rudolph contracted
polio just before her fifth birthday. Though not
expected to walk again, the fiercely determined girl
persevered with her leg exercises; by the time she
was 12, she no longer needed her steel brace. Eight
years later, Rudolph represented the U.S. in the 1960
Olympics in Rome, where, despite a twisted ankle,
she became the first American woman to win three
gold medals during a single Olympic competition.
Ages 7-12. Copyright 1996 Reed Business
Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover
edition.
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 7
Lesson Critique
Ernest
Text: Casey At The Bat by
Lawrence Thayer
A baseball team from the fictional town of Mudville (implied to
be the home team) is losing by two runs with two outs in their
last inning. Both the team and its fans (in the poem, about
5,000 attended the game) believe they can win "if only" they
could somehow get "Mighty Casey" (Mudville's star player)
up to bat. However, Casey was scheduled to be the fifth
batter of the inning, the first two batters (Cooney and
Barrows) did not reach base, while the next two batters
(Flynn and Jimmy Blake) were perceived to be weak hitters
with little chance of reaching base to allow Casey an at
bat.Surprisingly, Flynn hits a single, and Jimmy Blake follows
with a double (Flynn reaching third on the play). Both runners
were now in scoring position and Casey represented the
potential winning run. However, Casey is so confident in his
abilities that he doesn't swing at the first two pitches, both
strikes. On the last pitch, the overconfident Casey strikes out,
ending the game and sending the crowd home unhappy.
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 8
Lesson Critique
Anne Frank
Text: The Diary of
A beloved classic since its initial publication in 1947, this vivid,
insightful journal is a fitting memorial to the gifted Jewish
teenager who died at Bergen-Belsen, Germany, in 1945. Born in
1929, Anne Frank received a blank diary on her 13th birthday,
just weeks before she and her family went into hiding in Nazioccupied Amsterdam. Her marvelously detailed, engagingly
personal entries chronicle 25 trying months of claustrophobic,
quarrelsome intimacy with her parents, sister, a second family,
and a middle-aged dentist who has little tolerance for Anne's
vivacity. The diary's universal appeal stems from its riveting
blend of the grubby particulars of life during wartime (scant, bad
food; shabby, outgrown clothes that can't be replaced; constant
fear of discovery) and candid discussion of emotions familiar to
every adolescent (everyone criticizes me, no one sees my real
nature, when will I be loved?). Yet Frank was no ordinary teen:
the later entries reveal a sense of compassion and a spiritual
depth remarkable in a girl barely 15. Her death epitomizes the
madness of the Holocaust, but for the millions who meet Anne
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 9
Lesson Critique
Text: To Kill A Mockingbird
Theme: Courage
Harper Lee's classic novel of a lawyer in the Deep South
defending a black man charged with the rape of a white
girl. One of the best-loved stories of all time, To Kill a
Mockingbird has earned many distinctions since its
original publication in 1960. It won the Pulitzer Prize, has
been translated into more than forty languages, sold more
than thirty million copies worldwide, and been made into an
enormously popular movie. Most recently, librarians across
the country gave the book the highest of honors by voting it
the best novel of the twentieth century.
Quote from story:
“There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go, nothing to buy and no
money to buy it with, nothing to see outside the boundaries of Maycomb
County. But it was a time of vague optimism for some of the people:
Maycomb County had recently been told that it had nothing to fear but
27fear
itself.”
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 10
Lesson Critique
Text: Julius Caesar
Theme: Power
Julius Caesar is a highly successful but
ambitious political leader of Rome and his goal is
to become an unassailable dictator. Caesar is
warned that he must "beware the Ides of March" .
The prophecy comes true and Caesar is
assassinated. Marcus Brutus is a well respected
Roman senator who helps plan and carry out
Caesar's assassination which he believes will rid
Rome of a tyrant. Caesar's friend Mark Antony
provides the famous funeral oration ("Friends,
Romans, and countrymen…") Brutus and
Cassius meet their inevitable defeat. Brutus, the
noble Roman, whose decision to take part in the
conspiracy for the sake of freedom, plunges his
28
country into civil war.
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 11
Lesson Critique
Text: The Grapes of Wrath
Theme: Man’s Inhumanity to
Man
Novel by John Steinbeck, published in 1939. Set during
the Great Depression, it traces the migration of an
Oklahoma Dust Bowl family to California and their
subsequent hardships as migrant farm workers. It won a
Pulitzer Prize in 1940. The work did much to publicize the
injustices of migrant labor. The narrative, interrupted by
prose-poem interludes, chronicles the struggles of the
Joad family's life on a failing Oklahoma farm, their difficult
journey to California, and their disillusionment once they
arrive there and fall prey to a parasitic economic system.
The insularity of the Joads--Ma's obsession with family
togetherness, son Tom's self-centeredness, and daughter
Rose of Sharon's materialism--ultimately gives way to a
sense of universal community. -- The Merriam-Webster
29
Encyclopedia of Literature --This text refers to the
DOES THE CONTENT OF THIS LESSON REFLECT THE STUDENT’S
CULTURE AND LANGUAGE?
IF NOT, CONTENT-WISE, WHAT WOULD BE NEEDED TO MAKE THIS
LESSON MORE CULTURALLY RELEVANT AND RESPONSIVE?
Grade 12
Lesson Critique
Text: Cry, The Beloved
Country
The novel opens in a small village in Ixopo (Ndotsheni), where the black pastor Stephen Kumalo
receives a letter from the priest Theophilus Msimangu in Johannesburg. Msimangu urges Kumalo to
come to the city to help his sister Gertrude, because she is ill. Kumalo goes to Johannesburg to help
Gertrude and to find his son Absalom, who had gone to the city to look for Gertrude but never came
home. When he gets to the city, Kumalo learns that Gertrude has taken up a life of prostitution and
beer brewing, and is now drinking heavily. She agrees to return to the village with her young son.
Assured, Kumalo embarks on the search for his son, first seeing his brother John, a carpenter who
has become involved in the politics of South Africa. Kumalo and Msimangu follow Absalom's trail only
to learn that Absalom has been in a reformatory and impregnated a young woman. Shortly thereafter,
Kumalo learns that his son has been arrested for the murder during a burglary of Arthur Jarvis (who
was an engineer), a white activist for racial justice and son of Kumalo's neighbour James Jarvis.
Jarvis learns of his son's death and comes with his family to Johannesburg. Jarvis and his son had
been distant, and now the father begins to know his son through his writings. Through reading his
son's essays, Jarvis decides to take up his son's work on behalf of South Africa's black population.
Absalom is sentenced to death for the murder of Arthur Jarvis. Before his father returns to Ndotsheni,
Absalom marries the girl who is carrying his child, and she joins Kumalo's family. Kumalo returns to
his village with his daughter-in-law and nephew, having found that Gertrude ran away on the night
before their departure.
Back in Ixopo, Kumalo makes a futile visit to the tribe's chief in order to discuss changes that must be
made to help the barren village. Help arrives, however, when James Jarvis becomes involved
30 in the
work. He arranges to have a dam built and hires an native agricultural demonstrator to implement
new farming methods.
Sources
• Johnson-Davis, L. (2009). Appropriate Use of All Types of Text
Culturally and Linguistically. Center for Culturally Responsive
Teaching and Learning.
• Kellner, D. (2000) New technologies/new literacies: reconstructing
education for the new millennium, Teaching Education 11 (3): 24565.
• Tatum, A. (2009). Reading for their Life: Re-building the Textual
Lineages of African American Adolescent Males. NH: Heinemann
• Lemoine, N. (2001). Language Variation and Literacy Acquisition in
African American Students (p. 169-194). In Harris, J., Kamhi, A. &
Pollock, K. (Eds) Literacy in African American Communities. New
Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum & Associates
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