New Jersey’s English
Language Proficiency
Standards
Presenters: Raquel Sinai,
Bilingual/ESL Coordinator
Lori Ramella, Bilingual/ESL
Ed. Specialist
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 Previous standards aligned the TESOL ESL
standards to New Jersey’s Language Arts Literacy
Standards
 Language Arts Literacy Standards were revised in
2002
 No Child Left Behind mandates ELP standards that:
• address the four domains of listening, speaking,
reading and writing and
• are linked to the academic content and
achievement standards in reading/language arts,
mathematics and science (by 2005-06)
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ELP
Standards
Link on
Professional Website
Development
Training
Initiate
Develop
rationale for
format/structure
Form
Committee
ELP Standards
Development Work Classroom Tasks
Dissemination
Review
Process
Editing for
Revisions
3
• Preparation beforehand
(readings, standards review)
• 11 Bilingual/ESL teachers –
Pre-K-12
• Heterogeneous group
• Grade clusters
4
To revise New Jersey’s English language
proficiency standards so they:
• Focus primarily on Goal 2 of the TESOL
standards,
• Link to NJ CCCS in LAL to language
proficiency levels
• Incorporate Math , Science, & Social
Studies vocabulary, tasks, and language
functions and
• Be user-friendly
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• TESOL’s ESL Standards
• New Jersey Language Arts
Literacy Core Curriculum Content
Standards
• New Jersey Five Language
Proficiency Levels
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1-Beginners
2-Lower Intermediate
3-Upper Intermediate
4-Advanced
5-Full English Proficient
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GOAL – The goal of New Jersey’s English Language Proficiency Standards is to
teach English Language Learners/LEP students to use English to achieve
academically in all content areas.
Grades
English Language Proficiency Standard
Cumulative Progress
Indicators
English Language
Proficiency Levels
Classroom Tasks
LAL or TESOL
Standard/CPI/Grade
By the end of grade ___
students will:
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•
•
•
•
•
To aurally comprehend spoken English in both
a social and school setting.
To speak English in both a social and school
setting.
To read (decode and comprehend) texts for
recreational and academic purposes.
To write for personal and academic purposes.
To view, understand, & use non-textual visual
information for academic purposes.
9
10
11
12
13
• Develop Curriculum Based on Topics and Themes,
with focus on Content and Specialized Vocabulary
• Examine Expected Cumulative Progress
Indicators and ELP Levels
• Design Tasks Within the Theme for Differentiated
Student Levels of Proficiency
• Design Assessments Based on SWBAT sample
expectations
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• Read Stone Fox and Demonstrate an
Understanding of the Theme “Those That
Want to Be Bad Enough, Will”
• Level 1 – Draw a picture which
demonstrates an understanding of the
ending of the book or organize picture
cards for the correct sequence of events
of the story.
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• Level 2 – In pairs, students will ask
and answer questions about the key
plot points which explain the theme.
• Level 3 – Students, using a graphic
organizer to organize their thoughts,
will write an explanation of the quote in
a well-organized paragraph.
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• Level 4 – Explain the theme in writing, relating it
to the quote and discuss an example of a similar
experience in their own lives.
• Level 5 – Explain the theme in writing, relate the
theme to Stone Fox and how past events affected
his life and current behavior toward white men.
Compare and contrast this information to what you
have learned about Native Americans in American
history.
17
Bailey, Alison C., Butler, Frances A., LaFramenta, Charmien, Ong, Christine (2001). “Towards
the Characterization of Academic Language in Upper Elementary Science Classrooms.”
Los Angeles, CA: CRESST.
Chamot, A.U., & O’Malley, J.M. (1994). The CALLA Handbook: Implementing the Cognitive
Academic Language Learning Approach. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Company.
Keene, Ellin Oliver, Zimmerman, Susan. (1997). Mosaic of Thought: Teaching Comprehension in
a Reader’s Workshop. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Kinsella, K. (1997). Moving From Comprehensible Input to “Learning to Learn” in Content-based
Instruction. M.A. Snow & D.M. Britton (Eds.), Perspectives on Integrating Language
and Content (pp. 46-48). White Plains, NY: Addison-Wesley Longman.
New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Language Arts Literacy (2002, 2004).
www.state.nj.us/njded/cccs/02/s3_lal.htm
Stevens, Robin A., Butler, Frances A., Castellon-Wellington, Martha (2001). “Academic Language
and Content Assessment: Measuring the Progress of English Language Learners.” Los
Angeles, CA: CRESST.
TESOL, Inc. (1997). ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students. Alexandria, VA: Teachers of English to 18
Speakers of Other Languages, Inc.
New Jersey Department of
Education
Office of Specialized Populations
Bureau of Bilingual/ESL Education
James F. Curry, Acting Director, [email protected]
Raquel Sinai, Bilingual/ESL Coordinator,
[email protected]
Louis D’Amato, Bilingual/ESL Education Program Specialist,
[email protected]
Lori Ramella, Bilingual/ESL Education Program Specialist,
[email protected]
www.state.nj.us/education
www.nj.gov/njded/bilingual
(609) 292-8777
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New Jersey' English Language Proficiency Standards