Cooperation and
Competition
Unit 1: Open Court
Objectives
• You will identify derivatives that build on root
words with the suffixes –tion, -ing, and –or.
• You will recognize and read blends of
consonants with the letter r at the beginnings
of words.
• You will also recognize and read words with
different spelling of the /er/ sound and with
the /a/ sound spelled a.
• Finally, you will develop fluency reading
words and sentences aloud. Let’s begin!
Word Knowledge
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Compete competitor competition competing
Broke
Friday
grade
proud tripped
Soccer
hurt
whir
pertain
Accident activity
classroom
absent ballot
Each competitor was proud.
She tripped while playing soccer.
The competition is on Friday.
There were many empty desks in the classroom
because students were absent.
What do these words have in common?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Compete
competitor
competition
competing
The words include the root word compete and some of it’s derivatives.
What does compete mean?
It means, “to try to win or gain something from another or others.”
Can I get you students to look the work up in your glossary?
How does the word’s origin compare with it’s meaning today?
What are the suffixes of compete used above and what do they mean?
-or (or –er) means doer, maker, or resident. The suffix –tion (or-son) means
action, state, or result. The ending –ing is used to form nouns of verbs,
or to denote an action.
Can you think of other words that take these suffixes?
Elect, elector, election, electing
What is the root word and what are the meaning of the words?
What is the same with these
words?
• broke
Friday grade
proud tripped
• The words contain consonant plus -r blends.
• With your partner, come up with words that have
a consonant plus –r word blends.
• Here are some examples:
• Driver, president, principal, friend.
What is the spelling pattern in the next set of words?
• Soccer hurt whir pertain
• The words illustrate different spellings
for the /er/ sound.
• Spellings for the /er/ sounds include
er, ir, and ur.
• Look around the room. Can you see
any words with the /er/ sound?
What’s the secret pattern between these words?
• Accident activity classroom
absent ballot
• The words contain the /a/ sound spelled a,
no matter where it appears in the syllable.
• Can you think up any other examples?
Please read the following sentences together:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Each competitor was proud.
She tripped while playing soccer.
Can someone remember the words that have /er/?
Competitor, and soccer are right!
Let’s do it again!
Each competitor was proud.
She tripped while playing soccer.
What about the words that contain blends with the letter r?
That’s correct: proud, competitor
What were the nouns in the sentence?
• Competitor, soccer- Excellent!
Now, let’s read the following sentences together:
• Accident activity classroom absent ballot
• Each competitor was proud.
• She tripped while playing soccer.
•
•
•
•
Which words had the root word compete?
Competitor, competition
What’s the function of these words?
They are subjects! Nice job folks…
One last line: Let’s read it,… today!
• There were many empty desks in the
classroom because students were absent.
• Which words have the /a/ sound?
• There were many empty desks in the
classroom because students were absent.
• That’s right!
Classroom, absent
Background Information
• The class president is often selected
each year by fellow classmates.
• The duties of a class president vary.
• In my class, the class president is in
charge of the playground balls and
helping me set up for fun events.
Class President
• Predict what the story might be about
• Questions that come to mind.
• Images that pop into my mind.
(Visualize)
• Summarize story in own words
•
Listen/Speak 1.1,1.2
Preview and Prepare
(Reading 2.3 pp. 20M-20N)
• Let ‘s read aloud: the title, the author and illustrator.
•
•
•
•
Now let’s browse the first page or two of the story.
Who are the main characters?
Look at the illustrations in the selections.
Make sure you make predictions about the text to
help monitor your comprehension.
• Look for: clues, problems, such as unfamiliar words
(trans. 54)
• Now let’s look at the focus question.
Student Observation
• Clues
Problems
• “Vote for Cricket” Pronunciation of Julio
Wonderings
Who is running for
office?
Set Purpose (Focus Question)
• What qualities do good leaders have?
• If you were running for class president,
what would your strategy be for winning
the election?
Selection Vocabulary
Reading 1.3, 1.5 p. 20N
Trans 1
• Election campaign represent candidate
confidence
(Transparency 1)
• What do these words mean?
• Context clues, word structure (root word,
prefix & suffix), apposition, prior knowledge
• Add vocabulary words to your Writers’
Notebook in the Vocabulary Words section
• Vocabulary words and the definitions
Selection Vocabulary
Reading 1.4
p. 20N
Trans 1
•
•
•
•
•
Election
campaign
represent
candidate
confidence
Selection Vocabulary
Reading 1.4
p. 20N
Trans 1
• Election: how people vote for someone to serve in an office or
approve an idea (page 20)
• Nomination: to select someone for office (pg. 20)
• Second: to support one’s vote (pg. 20)
• Bore: to drill (pg. 22)
• Campaign: an organized effort to accomplish a purpose (pg 23)
• Represent: speak or act for someone else (pg 24)
• Confidence: belief in one’s ability to do something (pg.27)
• Parliamentary procedure: the government rules of voting (pg. 29)
• Move: to request or ask for (pg. 32)
Investigating Concepts
Beyond the Text
TG 35A Workshop time
• What do you know already about
competition and cooperation. During
the next six weeks we will read stories
and discuss aspects of competition and
cooperation.
• Please complete Inquiry Journal, pg. 5.
• Let’s share our findings later on.
Investigating Concepts
Beyond the Text
TG 35A Workshop time
• What are some examples of
cooperation and competition?
• Let’s list some in our Inquiry Journal, pg. 8.
• Come up with two questions for the
Concept/Question board about
competition and cooperation.
• Let’s share our findings later on.
Language Arts Day 1
Word Analysis
(TE. P. 35F)
• Spelling – The /a/ sound can be found by
looking at the lamb card. This lesson
focuses on the /a/ sound.
• Accident activity classroom absent ballot
• Pretest p.26
• Vocabulary Skill Words
• Nomination second bore move campaign
English Language Conventions
Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics
(TG p. 35F Eng. Lang. Conv. 1.0, 1.4)
• Nouns
– A noun is a word that names any person, place, thing or
idea.
– A common noun names any person, place, thing, or idea.
A common noun is lower case unless it begins a sentence.
– A proper noun names a particular person, place, or thing. A
proper noun is always capitalized.
– Most of the time, a singular noun can be made plural by
adding –s. Other nouns are made plural by adding –es
(tax—taxes), changing y to i and adding –es (celebritycelebrities), or changing f to v and adding –es (elf—
elves), or completely changing its form (man—men).
English Language Conventions
Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics
(TG p. 35F Eng. Lang. Conv. 1.0, 1.4)
• Use Language Arts Handbook pp
342-342
• Comprehension and Language Arts
Skills Book p. 4-5
(Independent Practice)
Writing Process Strategies
TG p. 35F (writing 1.0)
•
•
•
•
•
•
Decisions Before Writing
Language Arts Handbook pp. 20-21
Inspiration
– Before I begin writing, I am going to ask myself some questions.:
– Has a specific topic been assigned or is it limited in any way?
– What do I want to focus on for my topic?
Let’s narrow the topic:
I’ve been assigned to write about cooperation and competition in
sports. Ill focus on the cooperation and competition that I see on my
soccer team.
Guided Practice –Brainstorming: Let’s complete a Main Idea
Web (LA-transparency 1) and write down key questions about
our topic.
Word Knowledge-Day 2 (TG p. 20L)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Compete
competitor
competition competing
Broke
Friday
grade
proud tripped
Soccer
hurt
whir
pertain
Accident
activity
classroom
absent ballot
Raise your hand if you can make up a sentence with one of the words
from word line 1.
Now, I need a second volunteer to raise their hand if they can extend
the sentence by answering the question Who? What? Where? When?
Why? or How?
Let’s repeat this activity using words from line 2.
Broke
Friday grade
proud tripped
Let’s repeat this activity using words from line 3.
Soccer
hurt
whir
pertain
Selection Vocabulary
(Review)
Reading 1.2, 1.5 p. 20N
Trans 1
• Election campaign represent candidate
confidence
(Transparency 1)
• What do these words mean?
• Context clues, word structure (root word,
prefix & suffix), apposition, prior knowledge
• Review vocabulary words from your
Writers’ Notebook (in the Vocabulary Words section)
• Vocabulary words and the definitions
Selection Vocabulary
Reading 1.4
p. 20N
Trans 1
•
•
•
•
•
Election
campaign
represent
candidate
confidence
Selection Vocabulary
Reading 1.4
p. 20N
Trans 1
• Election: how people vote for someone to serve in an office or
approve an idea (page 20)
• Nomination: to select someone for office (pg. 20)
• Second: to support one’s vote (pg. 20)
• Bore: to drill (pg. 22)
• Campaign: an organized effort to accomplish a purpose (pg 23)
• Represent: speak or act for someone else (pg 24)
• Confidence: belief in one’s ability to do something (pg.27)
• Parliamentary procedure: the government rules of voting (pg. 29)
• Move: to request or ask for (pg. 32)
Reading Recommendations
Second Read Day 2
(reading 1.1 p.20O-20P)
•
•
•
•
•
Making Predictions - causes reader to analyze
information given about story events and characters in
the context of how it may logically connect to the
story’s conclusion.
Predicting-causes readers to analyzes information
given about story events and characters in the context
of how it may logically connect to the story’s
conclusion.
Summarizing-prompts readers to keep track of what
they are reading and to focus their minds on important
information.
Students read pages 20-32 (Day 2)
Read aloud using fluency with appropriate expression,
pacing, and intonation.
Investigating Concepts
Beyond the Text
TG 35A Workshop time
• What are some examples of
cooperation and competition?
• Let’s list some in our Inquiry Journal, pg. 8.
• Come up with two questions for the
Concept/Question board about
competition and cooperation.
• Let’s share our findings later on.
Language Arts Day 2
Word Analysis
(TE. P.35G) ELC 1.5, Reading 1.0
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Spelling –Word Sort: Sort the spelling words by the number of
syllables in each word.
Vocabulary: Read the following sentence: Her explanation made
the instructions so lucid that I immediately understood what to do.
Have you see the underlined word before?
Does the word look like any other word you know?
How is the word used in a sentence?
Lucid means clear. You can find clues about word meanings by
determining how words are used in a sentence and recalling other
forms and uses of the words.
Guided Practice: Spelling Book, pg. 2 and 3
Let’s complete page 2 together. Page 3 is for homework.
100
English Language Conventions Grammar,
Usage, and Mechanics
•
(TG p. 35G E.L.C., 1.0,1.4)
Review: Nouns
– A noun is a word that names any person, place, thing or idea.
– A common noun names any person, place, thing, or idea.
A common noun is lower case unless it begins a sentence.
– A proper noun names a particular person, place, or thing. A
proper noun is always capitalized.
– Most of the time, a singular noun can be made plural by
adding –s. Other nouns are made plural by adding –es (tax—
taxes), changing y to i and adding –es (celebrity-celebrities), or
changing f to v and adding –es (elf—elves), or completely
changing its form (man—men).
•
Assignment: Look for common and proper nouns in The Class
President. Hint: The proper nouns are mainly names of students and
teachers.
Writing Process Strategies
TG p. 35F (Writing 1.0)
• Decisions Before Writing
• Think about the differences between a letter you might write to a
younger cousin and a letter you might write to a favorite author.
• How would they be different?
• Purpose and audience help you make decisions about
the form of writing you select.
• Let’s read Language Handbook, pgs. 264 to 264.
• Independent Practice –Imagine a writing idea. Determine the
following:1. topic, 2. purpose, 3. audience, 4. writing form.
• Let’s use the concept map (LA transparency 2) to map our
decisions.
Investigating Concepts Beyond the
Text
TG 35B
Workshop time
• Concept/Question Board
• Post questions you have about the story.
• Post questions you may have about the
story before reading it, if they were
unanswered.
• Bring in items, newspaper articles and
stories about competition, and cooperation.
• You can sign out and read books from the
concept/question board (for in class only).
Selection Vocabulary
Reading 1.4
p. 20N
Trans 1
• Election: how people vote for someone to serve in an office or
approve an idea (page 20)
• Nomination: to select someone for office (pg. 20)
• Second: to support one’s vote (pg. 20)
• Bore: to drill (pg. 22)
• Campaign: an organized effort to accomplish a purpose (pg 23)
• Represent: speak or act for someone else (pg 24)
• Confidence: belief in one’s ability to do something (pg.27)
• Parliamentary procedure: the government rules of voting (pg. 29)
• Move: to request or ask for (pg. 32)
Discussing Strategy Use
TE.p. 32
• Which confusing passages did you
clarify by reading on or by rereading?
• How often did you summarize as you
read?
• What kinds of questions did you ask as
you read?
• How did the strategies help you better
understand the selection?
Discussing the
Selection
Reading 2.3 Listen/Speak 1.1
TE. P 33A
• Handing-Off - Whole group discussion
Routine Card 1 (5. Handing-Off)
• Let’s go over rules for handing off.
• How does it connect to competition and cooperation?
• What have you learned that is new?
• What did you find interesting?
• What is important here?
• What was difficult to understand?
• What information surprised you?
• Whey would someone want to read this?
• Record your personal responses to the selection in
your Writers Notebook.
Student Observation
• Clues
Problems
• “Vote for Cricket” Pronunciation of Julio
Wonderings
Who is running for
office?
Selection Vocabulary
Reading 1.4
p. 20N
Trans 1
• Election: how people vote for someone to serve in an office or
approve an idea (page 20)
• Nomination: to select someone for office (pg. 20)
• Second: to support one’s vote (pg. 20)
• Bore: to drill (pg. 22)
• Campaign: an organized effort to accomplish a purpose (pg 23)
• Represent: speak or act for someone else (pg 24)
• Confidence: belief in one’s ability to do something (pg.27)
• Parliamentary procedure: the government rules of voting (pg. 29)
• Move: to request or ask for (pg. 32)
Second Read
Reading 2.1
day 3
p.20-32
• Comprehension Skills – Drawing
Conclusions
• Checking Comprehension p. 33
• How is Cricket affected the competition?
• Which characters put the most effort into
cooperation? Explain.
• Of Cricket, Lucas, and Julio, do you think the
best person won the election? Why?
Second Read Day 3
• Student Anthology pp. 20-32
• Comprehension Skills
– Main Idea and Details
Supporting the Reading
(TE p. 221C- Reading 2.3)
•
•
•
•
Comprehension Strategies: Summarizing
Good readers summarize to track of what they are
reading and to focus on important points in a text.
Subheadings in a text aid in summarizing. They alert
students who are reading the text for the first time to
the important ideas in their reading.
Guided Practice – find and write the subheads in
“Medicine: Past and Present”
Independent Practice: In your social studies book
Chapter 3 find the subheads and summarize the
section under each heading.
Inquiry, TE. 35C
Let’s discuss ideas about cooperation and competition
so far. What have you learned?
Of the ideas discussed in class about cooperation and
competition, describe which ones you found most
interesting.
-Complete Inquiry Journal, pg. 9.
Reading and Responding
(day 4)
–Inquiry Journal p.6
–Record your ideas and impressions
about the selection.
Day 3
(p. 35H )
• Spelling – /a/ sound: The spelling pattern for the /a/
sound, which is a, no matter where the letter is located.
• Guided Practice
– Spelling and Vocabulary Skills- pg. 4
• Vocabulary – Discovering word Meaning
Use your previous knowledge to determine word
meaning. What are some other ways to determine word
meaning? (e.x. look at meaning outside of text).
Let’s make a list:
What about:
-encyclopedias, reference books, glossaries, the internet,
the teacher, and other adults?
Day 3 English Language Conventions
(TG. p. 35H Eng. Lang. Conv. 1.4)
• Making Singular Nouns Plural and Capitalization–
• Read Lang. Arts Handbook pp. 342-343
• Capitalize names of places (cities, states, school, street names).
• Capitalize family members’ names and titles.
• Let’s compare:
We saw Aunt Paula, to Paula is my aunt.
• Independent Practice in Writing
– Write a paragraph about a trip you would like to
take and whom you would take with you. Include
at least four names of places or people.
Writing Process Strategies
Day 3 (TG 20H)
•
•
Decisions Before Writing
Imagine that you are going to write about two different student
candidates who are running for fifth grade class president.
• Your purpose wil be to examine the two candidates and provide
straightforward information about them for your audience.
• Choose the best form of writing to use:
-Personal Narrative, play, or informational report.
The answer is : informational report.
Informational reports are write to tell people something.
Read Language Arts Handbook, pages 94-95.
Compare and Contrast:
Let’s compare two things using a Venn Diagram (LA. Transparency 3).
Guided Practice: Select two subjects. Compare them using a Venn
Diagram in your writer’s notebook. Add ideas about your subjects.
Selection Vocabulary
Reading 1.4
p. 20N
Trans 1
•
•
•
•
•
Election
campaign
represent
candidate
confidence
Selection Vocabulary
Reading 1.4
p. 20N
Trans 1
• Election: how people vote for someone to serve in an office or
approve an idea (page 20)
• Nomination: to select someone for office (pg. 20)
• Second: to support one’s vote (pg. 20)
• Bore: to drill (pg. 22)
• Campaign: an organized effort to accomplish a purpose (pg 23)
• Represent: speak or act for someone else (pg 24)
• Confidence: belief in one’s ability to do something (pg.27)
• Parliamentary procedure: the government rules of voting (pg. 29)
• Move: to request or ask for (pg. 32)
Reading and Responding
(day 4)
• Meet the Author/Illustrator
• Johanna Hurwitz knew she wanted to be a writer from
the time she was ten years old, but she didn’t have a
book published until she was in her thirties. What does
that tell you about her?
• Johanna Hurwitz said,”It seems all my fiction has grown
out of real life experiences.” In what ways could writing
from her own experiences make her a better writer?
• Richard Hull worked as an art director with a magazine
before becoming a teacher or illustration. How do you
think these different experiences have helped him to
illustrate a story?
Literary Elements Day 4
TG p. 33E
• Character Analysis
• (How did the author make the characters seem real?)
• Johanna Hurwitz (the author) made the characters seem real by
describing their traits, motivation, conflicts, and changes they
undergo. These are depicted through:
-What the character thinks or says,
-What the character does, and why she or he does it,
-what other characters say about the character.
Guided Practice:
What do the following passages reveal about Julio’s character?
-Page 20: “At lunch, Cricket took out a bag of miniature chocolate
bards and gave them out to her classmates. Julio took his and
ate it. But it didn’t mean he was going to vote for Cricket.
(Indicates viewpoint: Julio does not think that receiving chocolate
from Cricket is reason enough to vote for her.)
Literary Elements Day 4
TG p. 33E
What do the following passages reveal about Julio’s character?
What do the following passages reveal about Julio’s character?
•
Page 21: “Julio wasn’t very good at making posters, as Cricket and
Zoe were, but he was determined to help his friend.”
(Indicates trait: Julio is loyal.)
-Page 24: “Julio took a deep breath. If Cricket or Lucas wasnot going to
talk, he would have to do it.”
(Indicates omtivation and conflict: Julio takes charge of the situation so
the problem can be solved)
-Page 30: “’He is tops,’ said Arthur. ‘He’s tops in my book.’”
(indicates relationship: Julio is respected by his classmates.)
Literary Elements Day 4
TG p. 33E
• Analyzes other characters from The Class
President.
• Compare the character with other characters
or people you know.
• For example, the contrast between Cricket
and Julio create conflict through which the
author’s ideas about communication are
created.
• Analyzes how different characters change
over the course of the story.
Supporting the Investigation
p.223D writing
• Time Lines –
– time lines are graphic devices on which important events are shown in
chronological order on a line.
– Each dot on the time line represents a date.
– Each dot represents a single event.
– A time line usually has a title that indicates the type of information that
is shown on the time line.
– Events listed on the time line are from left to right in the order of their
occurrence. The earliest event appears at the far left.
– A timeline can be made for any set of events; however, time lines
usually show meaningful relationships between events
– The events on your time line should be relevant to the question or
problem that he or she is investigating. Minor details and unimportant
events should be ignored.
• Guided Practice
– Using the time line on the board , chart the events of the selection in
chronological order.
• Independent Practice – Inquiry Journal pp 64-65
Day 4 Spelling
p.223I
• Spelling - /a/ sound
• Paddling-What is the base word?
• (paddle) Note the /a/ sound is spelled the
same in each form of the word.
• Complete Spelling Book, pg. 5
• Vocabulary:
• Take a minute to find a word in “Class
President” that you are unfamiliar with.
• Raise you hand to tell me two of the words.
How can we go about finding the meaning of
unknown words?
English Language Convention Day 4 TG 35I listen/Speak 1.3
Understanding what we hear
- One reason for listening well is to make informed judgments
based on what we’ve heard.
- To be a good listener, we need to:
- Make eye contact, and face the speaker in order to give him/her
your attention.
- We should also pay attention, concentrate on what is being said
and try not to be distracted.
- We learn information from many different sources: songs,
poetry, newspaper articles,…
- If we listen carefully, we can learn a lot of different information.
- The information we learn allows us to form our own ideas or
judgments. Listening well allows us to make informed
judgments.
English Language Convention Day 4 TG 35I
listen/Speak 1.3
• What information did you learn from “class
president”?
• Based on the information you learned, make
informed judgments about the characters
and the decisions they made.
• For example, was Julio the best person for
the job? Did Cricket make good points about
why Julio should not have been class
president?
Writing Process Strategies:
Day 4 TG 35I Writing 1.0
•
•
Decisions before Writing
Remember an experience you had in which you felt strong emotion.
Which writing form would work best?
(Personal narrative)
It is a true story about something that happened in your life.
Let’s read Language Arts Handbook, pages 146-151 for more information.
Now, lets imagine that Cricket wants to write about her experience of
running for class president. She would probably want to write about her
events during her campaign, the election itself, and the outcome.
• Complete the chain of events chart (Language Arts Transparency 4).
• Independent Practice: Create your own chain of events chart
in your writing folder. Use the personal experience you
remembered earlier and fill out the chart.
Day5
• General Review –
• Word Knowledge
• Lesson Assessment
(Reading 2.1,
2.2 & 3..3 )
– “Class President” pp.2-3 (TG p. 35I)
• Spelling – /a/ sound
(E.L.C. 1.7)
–Unit 1 Assessment 1 p. 30-31
• Vocabulary- Assessment Unit 1 p.4
(Reading 1.2, 1.3 & 1.4)
English Language Conventions (Penmanship)
• Let’s practice using cursive I and t:
•I i i i i i i i i i
•T t t t t t t t t t
• A good leader knows how to listen.
• Write a paragraph about a role model or
someone you admire.
• Write two paragraphs in cursive from
“Class President.”
Writing Process Strategies (Day 5)
Writing 1.0, 1.1a
• I want to write a story about my own life. I’ll try to remember all
of the events that shaped my life and made me want to become
a teacher.
• Autobiography-An autobiography is a true story written about
one’s own life. For more information, read Language Arts
Handbook, pgs. 152-157.
• Autobiographies are not random series of events in a person’s
life. Let’s look at Cricket in “Class President”.
• Imagine Cricket is a real person and becomes president of the
United States 30 years after the story. She wants to write her
own autobiography. What events might she want to write
about?
Writing Process Strategies (Day 5)
Writing 1.0, 1.1a
• Running for fifth-grade president, losing the election, and
describing what she learned may be what will be in her
autobiography.
• Guided Practice:
• Let’s look at the Main Idea Web (LA transparency 1) to focus on
topics for our autobiographies. List the ideas for your
autobiography in your writer’s notebook.
• Let’s look at the following Time Line (LA transparency 5) to help
us order events for our autobiography. Now, use the timeline to
list events for your autobiography. Put the timeline in your
writer’s notebook.
Social Studies Connection
p. 33F
• In “Class President” Julio points out that he is a
citizen of the United States. United States
citizens have certain privileges and rights.
Yet, they have certain responsibilities too.
-Let me use the popsicle sticks to get some
volunteers to use the internet and find out what
the rights, privileges and responsibilities of
U.S. citizens are. We will get the volunteers to
chart these findings later.
Social Studies Connection
p. 33F
• California Theme Connection
• In 1998, Cruz Bustamante was elected as
California’s Lieutenant Governor. He was the
first Latino elected to statewide office since
1871. His election also marked the first time in
20 years that the govern and lieutenant
governor were from the same political party.
• Drawing Conclusions: Suppose Julio’s class
had elected both a president and a vice
president, and that Cricket had been elected
vice president. What challenges would Julio
and Cricket face in working together?
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Competition and Cooperation