Implementing the Colorado
Model System for
Measures of Student Learning
A work session for district or BOCES
teams
The Colorado Department of Education
Educator Effectiveness
Summer 2013
Before we begin…
Find your work group – it ’s important where you
On the wall you will
sit. Try to sit with members of your school or
see a chart that will
district.
be used to capture
everyone’s level of
comfort and
knowledge with
High
Measures of Student
Knowledge
Learning. Place a
dot on the chart the
best represents your
Low
level of comfort and
Knowledge
knowledge currently.
Next
Low Comfort
High Comfort
Together We Can
Vision
All students in Colorado will become educated and
productive citizens capable of succeeding in a globally
competitive workforce.
Mission
The mission of CDE is to shape, support, and safeguard a
statewide education system that prepares all students for
success in a globally competitive world.
Goals
Students
Successful students
Prepare students to thrive in their education and in a globally competitive workforce.
 Ensure every student is on track to graduate postsecondary and workforce ready.
 Increase achievement for all students and close achievement gaps.
 Ensure students graduate ready for success in postsecondary education and the workforce.
 Increase national and international competitiveness for all students.
Great teachers and leaders
Educators
Ensure effective educators for every student and effective leaders
for every school and district.
 Increase and support the effectiveness of all educators.
 Optimize the preparation, retention, and effectiveness of new educators.
 Eliminate the educator equity gap.
Outstanding schools and districts
Schools/
Districts
State
Build the capacity of schools and districts to meet the needs of
Colorado students and their families.
 Increase school and district performance.
 Turnaround the state’s lowest performing districts and schools.
 Foster innovation and expand access to a rich array of high quality school choices for students.
Best education system in the nation
Build the best education system in the nation.
 Lead the nation in policy, innovation, and positive outcomes for students.
 Operate with excellence, efficiency, and effectiveness to become the best SEA in the nation.
 Attract and retain outstanding talent to CDE.
Driving
Questions
Students
Educators
Schools/
Districts
What do we want
students, educators,
schools, and districts to
know and be able to do?
How will we
know if
expectations
are met?
How will we respond
when help is needed
and to support
continued growth?
Assessments
•
•
•
•
RTI
PBIS
Targeted interventions
IEPs
Educator Quality
Standards
Educator
evaluations
•
•
•
•
Induction
Mentoring
Professional development plans
Remediation plans
Performance
Indicators
School and
district
performance
frameworks
• Unified planning
• Priority
• Turnaround
Colorado Academic
Standards
Expanding Student Learning
When we intentionally integrate…
 Coherent and rigorous academic standards
 Innovative and engaging learning options
 Supported and effective educators
 Aligned and meaningful assessments
 Statewide and district accountability
We can personalize learning and
ignite the potential of every student.
Introductions
How many of you
have attended a
CDE training or a
training in your
school/district on
Measures of
Student Learning?
Agenda
Measures of Student Learning
 Welcome and Purpose
 Introductions
 Measures of Student Learning
 Steps 1-5
 Create a template/pie chart
 Feedback and critical questioning
 Decision Framework
 Work Session and Next Steps
 Closing – Feedback and Reflection
Training Objectives:
Desired Outcomes
 Why am I here?
To understand the shift from student
growth to measures of student learning
 To gain a clear understanding of the 5
steps for including measures of student
learning in your evaluation system
To determine next steps for your school,
district or BOCES
Meeting Norms:
How We Will Play Together
How will we work together…
 Honor everyone’s time
 Listen to learn and apply to your context
 Balance participation and share airspace
 Paraphrase, probe, pause
 Suspend judgment
 Commit to practice and follow-through
 Avoid technological distractions
 Have a sense of humor
Line Dance
 Take two steps for ward if you’ve explored or read the Measures of

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





Student Learning guidance document.
Take one step for ward if you know the 4 required outcome measures that
must be included in evaluation.
Take two steps for ward if you feel comfortable explaining the 4 required
outcome measures that must be included in evaluation.
Take two steps for ward if you have completed an Assessment inventory in
your school or at your grade level/content area.
Take one step for ward if you’ve explored or utilized the Measures of
Student Learning Tool.
Take one step for ward if you’ve explored or utilized the Assessment
Review Tool.
Take one step for ward if you’ve participated in conversations about
student learning outcome measures in your school/district.
Take one step back if you are unsure what measures will be included in
your evaluation system or what decisions your school/district has made.
Take one leap for ward for attending this training!
Measures of Student Learning
STATE COUNCIL FOR EDUCATOR EFFECTIVENESS
Framework for System to Evaluate Teachers
Definition of Teacher Effectiveness
Quality Standards
I. Know Content
II. Establish
Environment
III. Facilitate
Learning
IV. Reflect on
Practice
50% Professional Practice Standards
Observations of
Teaching
Other Measures
Aligned with
CDE Guidelines
V. Demonstrate
Leadership
VI. Student
Growth
50% Student Growth Measures
Weighting: How Much Does
Each Standard Count
Towards Overall
Performance?
State
Other Assessments
Other Measures
Summative
for Non-tested
Aligned with
Assessments
Areas
CDE Guidelines
Match of test to teaching assignments
Weighting:
Scoring Framework: How Do Measures of Quality Standards
Result in a Determination of Individual Performance?
Performance Ratings
Ineffective
Partially Effective
Effective
Appeals Process
Highly Effective
From Student Academic Growth
to
Measures of Student Learning
Measures of Student Learning
Using multiple measures to
determine student learning over
time.
Colorado Growth
Model (CGM)
establishes
technical
measure of
“growth.”
Measures of Student Learning
 Brainstorm
How do you measure student learning in your
district/school?
Approaches for Selecting and Using
Multiple Measures in Educator Evaluation
Step 1: Review of
the assessment
requirements
Step 2: Determine
student learning
measures in your
district
Step 3: Select and
weight multiple
measures of student
learning
Step 4: Set student
learning outcome
targets and scales
Step 5: Combine the
results to get a
single student
outcomes rating
Decision Framework
Teacher Evaluations
VI. Responsibility for student
academic growth
Refers to outcomes on a
measure that are
attributed to an individual
licensed person,
e.g. DRA2 outcomes for a
1st Grade Teacher’s
students
Refers to outcomes on a
measure attributed to
two or more licensed
personnel,
e.g. 10th gr. Math TCAP –
All Secondary math
teachers in school
50% Student
Academic
Growth
Evaluated using the following:
(1) a measure of individuallyattributed growth,
(2) a measure of collectivelyattributed growth;
(3) when available, statewide
summative assessment
results; and
(4) for subjects with statewide
summative assessment
results available in two
consecutive grades, results
from the Colorado Growth
Model.
Step 1: Collective vs. Individual
Attribution
 Table Talk:
At your table, discuss if you want more
collective or individual attribution in your
evaluation system.
 Consider the advantages and unintended
consequences of both collective and individual.
Be prepared to share your thinking.
Approaches for Selecting and Using
Multiple Measures in Educator Evaluation
Step 1: Review of
the assessment
requirements
Step 2: Determine
student learning
measures in your
district
Step 3: Select and
weight multiple
measures of student
learning
Step 4: Set student
learning outcome
targets and scales
Step 5: Combine the
results to get a
single student
outcomes rating
Decision Framework
Step 2: Measures of Student
Learning
 Determine how student learning is
currently measured in your district
Conduct an assessment inventory to identify
what is currently being used to measure student
learning
 Identify where gaps exist
A Step-By-Step Guide for Selecting and
Using Student Learning Outcomes
Step 1: Review of
the assessment
requirements
Step 2: Determine
student learning
measures in your
district
Step 3: Select and
weight multiple
measures of student
learning
Step 4: Set student
learning outcome
targets and scales
Step 5: Combine the
results to get a
single student
outcomes rating
Decision Framework
Categorizing Teachers
No Categorization
Individual Decisions
Categorization
Group Decisions
What do we value?
How might we categorize our teachers?
How will our decisions reflect our values?
Categorizing Teachers
Example:
Colorado Growth
Model (CGM)
Reading, Writing, Math
(Gr. 4-10)
2.
State Summative
Reading, Writing, Math
(Gr. 3)
No Summative/CGM
All Other Teachers
Science
(Gr. 5, 8, 10)
Social Studies
(Gr. 4, 7, HS)
ACT (HS)
WIDA ACCESS (ELL)
What are the pros and cons of creating groups of like teachers based on
the types of measures that must be included in their body of evidence?
Based on what is expected in law, what categories of teachers are
possible?
Step 3: Measures of Student
Learning
 Select and weight multiple measures of student
learning to be included in educator evaluations.
 What can we do as a district to build comparable
bodies of evidence in like groups of teachers?
 Let’s try it!
 Measures of Student Learning Tool
Creating Specific Weighting
Templates
Create a template using the Measures of Student
Learning tool.
Questions to consider:
 What assessments must we include?
 How much influence will they have on the evaluation?
Create a pie chart for a category of teacher or
individual teacher that shows your thinking.
 Include a rationale.
Pie Chart Feedback
Round Robin
 Each group should select a spokesperson to
share your thinking and rationale for your
choices.
 Audience should consider feedback on:
 The collective vs. the individual attribution
 Types of assessments
 Weights
Debrief/Reflection
 Did the feedback help shape any of your
thinking?
 Any aha’s?
 What might you reconsider/change if
anything?
Using Local Assessments in
Evaluation
 Districts, BOCES and schools may decide after
completing the Assessment Inventory that a locally
created assessment would likely be included as a
measure in evaluation.
 Districts and BOCES can use the Assessment Review
Tool to show they are taking steps to ensure that the
locally created measurements they select are fair, valid,
and reliable.
Assessment Review Tool
Assessment Review Tool
Criteria used in this tool:
 Alignment
 Scoring
 Fair and Unbiased
 Opportunities to Learn
Assessment Support
Content Collaboratives
 P-12 educators from around the state gathered to identify and
create a high-quality assessment resource bank, which is aligned
to the new Colorado Academic Standards and may be used in the
context of Educator Effectiveness evaluations.
 The Content Collaboratives , CDE, along with state and national
experts, will establish examples of student learning measures
within each K – 12 content area including:
Cohort I
Dance
Drama & Theatre Arts
Reading, Writing and
Communicating
Music
Social Studies
Visual Arts
Cohort II
Physical Education
Mathematics
Science
World Languages
Comprehensive Health
CTE
Categorizing, Weighting, and
Selecting Measures Reflection
 Decision Points
 How will our district create templates for different
teacher roles and the types of assessments that exist?
 Who will participate in the process?
 What do we need to know in order to make good
decisions?
 What resources (internal and external) do we
have/need?
 How will we know if we have made good
decisions?
Approaches for Selecting and Using
Multiple Measures in Educator Evaluation
Step 1: Review of
the assessment
requirements
Step 2: Determine
student learning
measures in your
district
Step 3: Select and
weight multiple
measures of student
learning
Step 4: Set student
learning outcome
targets and scales
Step 5: Combine the
results to get a
single student
outcomes rating
Decision Framework
Step 4: Measures of Student
Learning
 Use the Student Learning Objective
Process to set outcome targets and scales
based on data from the selected
measures.
Student Learning Objective
Process
 What is the Student Learning Objective Process?
Enables educators to utilize academic standards
to establish learning outcomes for students,
monitor progress and evaluate the degree to
which students achieve those outcomes
In educator evaluation systems, this process
serves as a:
 Method of measuring student growth, progress or
mastery of the standards
Student Learning Objective
Process
 The essential steps of the Student Learning
Objective Process include:
 Understanding the Colorado Academic Standards in order to
select learning outcomes
 Collecting baseline information to inform target and scale
setting
 Assessing quality, attainment level and rigor of student
learning targets and scales
 Monitoring student learning (formative practice)
 Determining attainment of student learning targets and scales
 Reflecting and refining the Student Learning Objective Process
Student Learning Objective
Process
THE PROCESS OF: Understanding the Colorado
Academic Standards
THE PROCESS OF: Selecting
Learning Outcomes for Target
Setting
THE PROCESS OF: Procuring or
Developing Assessments Using
Quality Criteria
Turn and Talk:
• Why is it important to start the Student Learning
Objective process with the Colorado Academic
Standards?
• How does this first step support the work done in
professional practice?
• What tool is in place to support you with part of this
process?
Student Learning Objective
Process
THE PROCESS OF: Understanding the Colorado Academic Standards
THE PROCESS OF: Selecting Learning
Outcomes for Target Setting
THE PROCESS OF: Procuring or
Developing Assessments Using Quality
Criteria
THE PROCESS OF: Collecting Baseline Information
THE PROCESS OF: Setting Student
Learning Targets
THE PROCESS OF: Setting Appropriate
Scales for Measurement
Possible Student Learning
Targets and Scales
Examples of Student Learning Targets and
Scales:
 16 of my 21 students will increase their reading
proficiency by 1-2 grade levels.
 9 more students will receive + at the end of the
year.
 The median score on my end of course
assessment last year was 73%. At the end of the
course for this year, the median score will be at
least 78%.
Student Learning Objective Process:
Strategies for Target Setting
 Possible strategies to consider when determining how
students will be captured when target setting:
 Individual – Teacher sets individual goals for students and then
determines how many students met their individual goals
 Whole Class – Teacher sets a goal that would be applied to all
students in a class
 Subgroup of Students – Teacher sets a goal for a group(s) of
students with similar baseline data levels
 Case Load – Teacher sets a goal for the specific students he or she
supports
Some of these strategies may work better with some teaching
assignments. Can you think of which teaching assignments might
work best with which strategy based on your local context?
Student Learning Objective Process:
Strategies for Target Setting
 Possible strategies to consider when setting learning targets for
students: All targets are indicators of growth using a variety of
data sources:
 Proficiency data Targets – students meeting grade level
expectations
 Examples: a % of students will pass the end -of-course exam; a % of
students will score a 3 or better on the AP exam
 Growth data Targets – students growing over the course of
instruction
 Examples: a % of students will progress one fitness level; a % of
students will make projected growth or better on the MAP assessment
 Averaging data Targets – students’ average score on an
assessment
 Example: Students will answer, on average, 80% of the questions
correctly on the end-of-course exam
Possible Student Learning
Targets
What are the targets in these examples?
 16 of my 21 students will increase their reading
proficiency by 1-2 grade levels.
 9 more students will receive + at the end of the
year.
 The median score on my end of course
assessment last year was 73%. At the end of the
course for this year, the median score will be at
least 78%.
Student Learning Objective Process:
Strategies for Scale Setting
 Teachers set ranges (how many students are
expected to meet the set target) across 4 rating
levels: above expected, expected, less than
expected, and much less than expected
 Teachers collaboratively set ranges with their evaluator
 Ranges will vary from year to year and possibly class to
class as baseline data will vary due to student beginning
points
 Collaboratively setting ranges will allow teachers and
evaluators to calibrate about expected student learning
outcomes
Student Learning Objective Process:
Strategies for Scale Setting
 You can use the Measures of Student Learning
Tool to record the targets and scales you have
established.
 When Colorado Growth Model data is available
the scale indicating expected student learning
outcomes has been established for you.
Possible Student Learning
Scales
What are the scales in these examples?
 16 of my 21 students will increase their reading
proficiency by 1-2 grade levels.
 9 more students will receive + at the end of the year.
 The median score on my end of course assessment
last year was 73%. At the end of the course for this
year, the median score will be at least 78%.
Student Learning Objective Process:
Target Setting Practice
 With a partner, use the Setting Student Learning
Targets and Scales worksheet to analyze one set
of data.
 Portfolio/Performance Outcomes
 Baseline Reading Levels
 End of Course Summative Exam Results
 Rubric Outcomes
 Practice setting a student learning outcome
target for expected outcomes.
Student Learning Objective Process:
Scale Setting Practice
 Think about what your expected outcomes are
(targets).
 Establish the ranges for each of the categories
below.
 How did you decide on the ranges?
 Are your expectations rigorous, yet attainable?
Student Learning Objective Process:
Target and Scale Setting
ALL 4 sets of data
Performance Assessment/Portfolio Outcomes
+

-

+

-

+

-


+
-

-
+
+
-

Reading Levels (beginning of the year)
18 24 24 30 38 40 40 50 50 50 50 50 60 60 60 60 70 70 70 80 80
Cumulative exam
66 89 68 75 74 80 94 99 60 55 71 73 95 96 84 82 79 81 98 74 86
Rubric Results
6
4
1
5
5
2
6
2
5
2
1
6
3
3
5
3
1
2
6
4
4
Student Learning Objective
Process
THE PROCESS OF: Understanding the Colorado Academic Standards
THE PROCESS OF: Selecting Learning Outcomes
for Target Setting
THE PROCESS OF: Procuring or Developing
Assessments Using Quality Criteria
THE PROCESS OF: Collecting Baseline Information
THE PROCESS OF: Setting Student Learning
Targets
THE PROCESS OF: Setting Appropriate Scales for
Measurement
THE PROCESS OF: Assessing Quality, Attainment Level and Rigor of Student
Learning Targets and Scales
Student Learning Objective Process
Determine Target and Scale Quality
 Will your district establish quality criteria for
the use of Student Learning Targets and Scales?
 Criteria for establishing quality targets and
scales might include:
 Approval processes
 Collaboratively established
 Level of attainment
 Rigor
 Based on previous data
 Meet or exceed past student performance
Student Learning Objective
Process
THE PROCESS OF: Understanding the Colorado Academic Standards
THE PROCESS OF: Selecting Learning Outcomes for Target Setting
THE PROCESS OF: Procuring or Developing Assessments Using Quality
Criteria
THE PROCESS OF: Collecting Baseline Information
THE PROCESS OF: Setting Student Learning Targets
THE PROCESS OF: Setting Appropriate Scales for Measurement
THE PROCESS OF: Assessing Quality, Attainment Level and Rigor of Student
Learning Targets and Scales
THE PROCESS OF: Monitoring Student Learning (Formative Practice)
Student Learning Objective
Process
THE PROCESS OF: Understanding the Colorado Academic Standards
THE PROCESS OF: Selecting Learning Outcomes for Target Setting
THE PROCESS OF: Procuring or Developing Assessments Using Quality
Criteria
THE PROCESS OF: Collecting Baseline Information
THE PROCESS OF: Setting Student Learning Targets
THE PROCESS OF: Setting Appropriate Scales for Measurement
THE PROCESS OF: Assessing Quality, Attainment Level and Rigor of Student
Learning Targets and Scales
THE PROCESS OF: Monitoring Student Learning (Formative Practice)
THE PROCESS OF: Determining Attainment of Student Learning Targets and
Scales
Student Learning Targets:
Reflection on Pre and Post Data
Performance Assessment/Portfolio Outcomes
+


+
-


+
+


+
+
+
+
-


+

+
Reading Levels (beginning of the year)
30 40 38 38 50 50 50 60 50 60 70 70 60 70 70 80 80 70 80 80 80
End of year cumulative exam
75 90 76 89 80 99 90 91 80 70 82 79 94 95 98 95 66 87 98 85 71
Rubric results
5
5
3
6
6
4
3
5
6
6
4
5
4
4
6
5
3
6
5
6
5
Student Learning Objective
Process
THE PROCESS OF: Understanding the Colorado Academic Standards
THE PROCESS OF: Selecting Learning Outcomes for Target Setting
THE PROCESS OF: Procuring or Developing Assessments Using Quality
Criteria
THE PROCESS OF: Collecting Baseline Information
THE PROCESS OF: Setting Student Learning Targets
THE PROCESS OF: Setting Appropriate Scales for Measurement
THE PROCESS OF: Assessing Quality, Attainment Level and Rigor of Student
Learning Targets and Scales
THE PROCESS OF: Monitoring Student Learning (Formative Practice)
THE PROCESS OF: Determining Attainment of Student Learning Targets and
Scales
THE PROCESS OF: Reflecting and Refining Student Learning Objective Process
Considerations when Setting
Student Learning Targets
 Considerations when including the Student
Learning Objective Process in evaluation:
 Assessment literacy of educators creating targets
 Data literacy of educators
 Time and effort required of teacher and evaluator
 Focus of school or district (all students and/or subgroups of
students)
 Available information or data in school or district
 Ease or readiness level of teachers and evaluators
 Possible approval process of strategies selected
 Number of targets wanted as a district/building
Student Learning Objective
Process
 Reflection
 What are the pros and cons of using the Student
Learning Objective Process?
 What are teachers already doing to support process?
 Are there groups of teachers that already do something very
similar to creating Student Learning Targets and Scales?
 What additional ideas do you have for making the
Student Learning Objective Process more manageable?
Approaches for Selecting and Using
Multiple Measures in Educator Evaluation
Step 1: Review of
the assessment
requirements
Step 2: Determine
student learning
measures in your
district
Step 3: Select and
weight multiple
measures of student
learning
Step 4: Set student
learning outcome
targets and scales
Step 5: Combine the
results to get a
single student
learning outcomes
rating
Decision Framework
Step 5: Measures of Student
Learning
Combine the results of multiple
measures t o get a single measures of
student learning rating.
Combining Outcomes
 Draft Example
Decision Framework
 Putting It All Together
 The Decision Framework helps districts
aggregate the 50% Professional Practices and
the 50% Measures of Student Learning to reach
a final rating of one of the following:
 Highly Effective
 Effective
 Partially Effective
 Ineffective
Rating
Professional Practices Report
Quality
Standard
Element
Not
Evident
Partially
Proficient
a. Provides aligned instruction
1
b. Demonstrates knowledge of literacy development
1
I. Content
c. Demonstrates knowledge of mathematics (All)
and
d. Demonstrates knowledge of content
Pedagogical
e. Develops interconnected lessons
Knowledge
f. Makes instruction and content relevant to students
Proficient
Accomplished
4
0
Proficient
20.0%
108
* 10 / 24 =
45.0
20.0%
108
* 12 / 24 =
54.0
30.0%
162
* 15 / 32 =
75.9
15.0%
81
* 4 / 12 =
27.0
Proficient
15.0%
81
* 8 / 16 =
40.5
Proficient
100%
540
Pts earned =
242.4
3
b. Demonstrates a commitment and respect for diversity
4
c. Engages students
2
II. Learning
d. Adapts teaching to meet individual needs
Environment
1
e. Works and communicates with families
1
f. Creates a well managed learning environment
1
Overall Rating for Quality Standard II
Proficient
a. Demonstrates knowledge of current developmental science
4
b. Plans and delivers data driven instruction
3
c. Demonstrates knowledge of effective instructional practices
2
d. Integrates and utilizes technology
1
III.
e. Establishes high expectations for students
Instruction
2
f. Provides opportunities to develop leadership qualities
2
0
1
Overall Rating for Quality Standard III
IV.
Reflection
Proficient
a. Analyzes student data and applies to instruction
1
b. Links professional growth to professional goals
1
c. Is able to respond to a complex, dynamic environment
Overall Rating for Quality Standard IV
a.
b.
V.
c.
Leadership
d.
Demonstrates leadership
Contributes to the teaching profession
Advocates for schools and students
Demonstrates high ethical standards
Overall Rating for Quality Standard V
Overall Rating
Points
Earned
2
Overall Rating for Quality Standard I
h. Uses appropriate methods to assess
Weights Points * earned /
by std Possible possible =
2
a. Fosters a predictable, caring learning environment
g. Communicates to students effectively (objectives)
Exemplary
2
Partially Proficient
2
1
1
4
How to combine professional practice and measures of student learning ratings
540
Professional Practices
Exemplary
(433 to 540 pts)
Accomplished
(325 to 432 pts)
Proficient
(217 to 324 pts)
0
540
Partially Proficient
(109to 216pts)
Basic
(0 to 108pts)
Much Lower Than
Expected Growth
(0 to 134 pts)
0
Lower Than
Expected Growth
(135 to 269 pts)
Expected Growth
(270 to 404 pts)
Measures of Student Learning
Higher Than
Expected Growth
(405 to 540 pts)
1.
Training
2.
Include any new
district or school
decisions for
measuring student
learning
Annual
Orientation
9.
Evaluation Cycle
Principal/Assistant
Principals and Teachers
SelfAssessment
Train: Prior to
thePrior
beginning
to the of
Within the first
beginning
School.
End of of
two
End
Mid-June
May
weeks
of June
15
Mayof
Spring
Orient:
September.
Semester
Within
school.
the first week of
School.
8.
Final Ratings
Review and finalize
compiled results
from measures of
student learning
3.
Goal-Setting
and
Performance
Planning
4.
Review of
Annual Goals
and
Performance
Plan
7.
5.
End-of-Year
Review
Mid-Year
Review
6.
Evaluator
Assessment
Confirm measures
used to determine
student learning–
Finalize baseline
data
Review available
data from measures
to determine if
students are on
track
What are your next steps?
 Consider decision points, priorities and what
you value.
 Identify next steps for your Performance
Evaluation Committee.
Let’s Get to Work!
 CDE Educator Effectiveness website:
http://www.cde.state.co.us/EducatorEffectiveness/
 FAQ’s, Fact Sheets
 Policy and State Model Evaluation System Info
 Six Steps guidance document
http://www.cde.state.co.us/EducatorEffectiveness/Stud
entGrowthGuide.asp
 CDE Educator Effectiveness e-newsletter
 http://www.cde.state.co.us/scripts/communications/EE
Newsletter.asp
 Stay informed by signing up for this monthly newsletter
Where are you now?
On the wall you will see a chart that will be used to capture
everyone’s level of comfort and knowledge with Measures of
Student Learning. Place a dot on the chart the best represents
your level of comfort and knowledge now that we are near the
end of the training.
High Knowledge
Next
Low Knowledge
Low Comfort
High Comfort
Feedback
Please take a few minutes to
complete your feedback form.
Contact Us
EE Leadership
Communications
 Katy Anthes: Executive Director  Amy Skinner
 [email protected][email protected]
 Toby King: Director
 Katie Lams:
 [email protected][email protected]
 Jean Williams: Rubric Evaluation
Specialist
 [email protected]
Colorado Legacy Foundation
 Mike Gradoz: Director
 [email protected]
 Britt Wilkenfeld: Data Fellow
 [email protected]
 Tricia Majors: Project Mgr.
 [email protected]
Contact Us
Implementation Support
and Development
 Courtney Cabrera
 [email protected]
 Sed Keller
 [email protected]
 Dawn Pare
 [email protected]
 Bob Snead
 [email protected]
 Chris Vance
 [email protected]
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