Ellicott Mills
Middle School
Media Center
Handbook of
Policies & Procedures
Created by Christy Batelka
SLM 501
7.17.08
Handbook Purpose:
This handbook has been designed to assist
school library media specialists and media
staff in understanding the various policies
and procedures currently in place at the
Ellicott Mills Middle School Media Center.
All policies and procedures have been
designed to align with MD State and
Howard County standards for library media
programs and to uphold all library users’
right to free, equitable access to technology,
resources, and media services.
1
Table of Contents:
Handbook Purpose
1
PROGRAM DOCUMENTS
School Library Media Personnel
4-5
Central Office Library Media Personnel
6
Library Media Program Mission & Vision Statements
7
Philosophy of a School Library Media Program
8
Collaborative Planning Guidelines & Forms
9-12
Acceptable Use of Computer Technology Policy
13-15
Academic Integrity & Plagiarism
16-17
Copyright at School
18-25
Privacy & Confidentiality Policy
26
Information Literacy Curriculum
27-32
COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT DOCUMENTS
Collection Development & Selection Policy
33-71
Review & Reevaluation of Materials in Use
72-73
Donations Policy
74-75
Weeding Policy & Procedure
76-79
Record Keeping
80
Inventory
81-87
Budget Guidelines
88-89
Ordering Process & Procedures
90-99
Receiving & Processing
100-108
Utilization of Library Media Materials & Services
109-110
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures
111-121
Teacher Request Procedure
122-123
2
Table of Contents:
OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
Circulation Procedures
124-125
Interlibrary Loan Procedure
126
Scheduling of the Media Center & Computer Lab
127-129
Open Access Policy
130
Media Center Hours
130
Student Passes
130
Student Behavior Expectations
130
Adult Volunteers & Student Assistants
131
Media Specialist Substitutes
132
PLANNING DOCUMENTS
Yearly Goals & Long-Range Plans
133-135
Howard County Annual Report
136
Maryland State Annual Report
137-139
Program & Personnel Evaluation
140-142
CONTACTS
Central Office Staff
143-144
Howard County Media Specialists & Media Assistants
145-148
Professional Organizations
149
3
Operational Procedures:
Circulation Procedures
124-125
Interlibrary Loan Procedure
126
Scheduling of the Media Center & Computer Lab
127-129
Open Access Policy
130
Media Center Hours
130
Student Passes
130
Student Behavior Expectations
130
Adult Volunteers & Student Assistants
131
Media Specialist Substitutes
132
Planning Documents:
Yearly Goals & Long-Range Plans
133-135
Howard County Annual Report
136
Maryland State Annual Report
137-139
Program & Personnel Evaluation
140-142
Contacts:
Central Office Staff
143-144
Howard County Media Specialists & Media Assistants
145-148
Professional Organizations
149
Program Documents:
School Library Media Personnel
4-5
Central Office Library Media Personnel
6
Library Media Program Mission & Vision Statements
7
Philosophy of a School Library Media Program
8
Collaborative Planning Guidelines & Forms
9-12
Acceptable Use of Computer Technology Policy
13-15
Academic Integrity & Plagiarism
16-17
Copyright at School
18-25
Privacy & Confidentiality Policy
26
Information Literacy Curriculum
27-32
Collection Development
Documents:
Collection Development & Selection Policy
33-71
Review & Reevaluation of Materials in Use
72-73
Donations Policy
74-75
Weeding Policy & Procedure
76-79
Record Keeping
80
Inventory
81-87
Budget Guidelines
88-89
Ordering Process & Procedures
90-99
Receiving & Processing
100-108
Utilization of Library Media Materials & Services
109-110
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures
111-121
Teacher Request Procedure
122-123
School Library Media Personnel:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Library Media Specialist:
School library media specialists are the professional, certificated staff members charged with
the daily operation of the library media program at the school level. They have the primary
responsibility for the professional library media center functions (i.e., evaluation and selection;
ordering and processing; utilization of media; organization of the library media collection;
circulation of library media materials; production of original media; and management of
instructional equipment). Information Power (ALA, 1998) provides a framework for the library
media program. The ideal student-centered library media program is based upon three
essential elements: learning and teaching, information access, and program administration.
These elements suggest the roles that the library media specialist plays in supporting student
learning. Within this framework, the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) and
the Association of Education and Communications Technology (AECT) established four
responsibilities that library media specialists should fulfill: teacher, instructional partner,
information specialist, and program administrator.
Teacher - The learning and teaching principles of Information Power require that the library
media specialist be both teacher and instructional partner. As a teacher, the library media
specialist works effectively with students as well as with teachers, administrators, and other
staff members to convey the information literacy skills necessary for success in today's world.
The library media specialist should know and use current research in teaching and learning in
order to help others learn how to access, evaluate, and use information.
Instructional Partner - As an instructional partner, the library media specialist collaborates
with other teachers, working to integrate information literacy skills into the existing
curriculum. Working in concert with classroom teachers and curriculum experts, library media
specialists form a comprehensive team designed to enhance student academic achievement and
critical thinking skills necessary for success in lifelong endeavors. The key is for library media
specialists and teachers to work collaboratively to help students learn both the subject matter
and the information skills.
Information Specialist - As a specialist in information access and analysis, the library media
specialist helps administrators, teachers, students, and others learn to find and evaluate
information in all formats. The library media specialist should understand current theory
applicable to particular media as well as research in such areas as critical thinking and reading
comprehension in order to model the use of information effectively to others.
Program Administrator - In the role of program administrator, the library media specialist
leads the development of policies and procedures for the library media center. He or she also
manages the everyday operations of the library media center. Library media specialists in
Howard County also have a technology role. This includes coordinating the technology
program in the school and participating in the development of long range technology plans for
the school. As a professional, each library media specialist should consider the benefits of
membership in local, state, and national organizations which reflect the concerns of our
profession. See the appendix for a list of these professional organizations.
4
School Library Media Personnel:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Paraeducator-Media/Library Media Secretary:
Library media secretaries are assigned to all high schools. Paraeducators-media are assigned to
all middle and elementary schools. A paraeducator-media/library media secretary is necessary
to relieve the library media specialist of many clerical tasks and assist with technology
throughout the school This paraeducator/secretary must acquire a thorough knowledge of the
school library media collection and program, and should be able to assist students and teachers
in their use of the library media center. The paraeducator-media/library media secretary may:
* Supervise the circulation system and other routines
* Perform office jobs, especially typing of reports, etc.
* Supervise “housekeeping” tasks necessary to keep the library media center neat and
attractive
* Work with individuals and small groups of students in such areas as book selection,
reference, computer use, and media production
* Assist students and staff with the use of computers and software
* Perform any other duties assigned by the library media specialist.
5
Central Office Library Media Personnel:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
The Coordinator of Media and Educational Technology reports directly to the Director of
Secondary Curricular Programs, and provides staff leadership in the development, administration,
and supervision of school library media programs. The Coordinator is also responsible for the K-12
Educational Technology program. The Coordinator is responsible for budget development and
administration, curriculum, purchasing, and observing teachers.
Library Media Instructional Facilitator
The Library Media Instructional Facilitator works under the direction of the Coordinator of
Media and Educational Technology and provides facilitative leadership and site-based school
improvement support for the Library Media program at all instructional levels. The Library Media
Instructional Facilitator's functions directly affect the Library Media program's budget
development and administration of inservice programs for library media specialists. The Library
Media Instructional Facilitator is responsible for the operations of Media Technical Services. The
facilitator also acts as a liaison between Howard County and local, state, and federal agencies.
Educational Technology Instructional Facilitator
The Educational Technology Instructional Facilitator works under the direction of the
Coordinator of Media and Educational Technology and provides facilitative leadership and sitebased school improvement support for the Educational Technology program at all instructional
levels. The Educational Technology Instructional Facilitator’s functions directly affect the
Educational Technology program’s budget development and administration, as well as the
development and administration of inservice programs for library media specialists. The facilitator
also acts as a liaison between Howard County and local, state and federal agencies.
Educational Technology Resource Teachers
Educational Technology Resource Teachers provide onsite technology support for the effective
integration of educational technology into the curriculum. Educational Technology Resource
Teachers provide school-based inservice training for small and large groups of K-12 library media
specialists and teachers.
The secretary for the Office of Media and Educational Technology assists the coordinator,
instructional facilitator, and resource teachers in the clerical tasks involved in the smooth operation
of the Office of Media and Educational Technology. The secretary’s varied duties include handling
correspondence between library media specialists and teachers and the Office of Media and
Educational Technology, as well as offering assistance to school library media specialists and
teachers by channeling telephone inquiries.
Manager of Media Technical Services
The Manager of Media Technical Services has the responsibility for the Materials Processing
Center and Media Technical Services operations. Additional functions include ordering, cataloging,
circulating and processing of materials for new and existing library media centers and the Central
AV Library.
In addition to the Coordinator of Media and Educational Technology, the Library Media
Instructional Facilitator, the Educational Technology Instructional Facilitator, the Educational
Technology Resource Teachers, and the Manager of Media Technical Services, many central office
personnel provide direct services to school library media specialists. For assistance in arranging
emergency computer and equipment repairs, contact the Technology Service Center at 410-313-
6
7004. Networks and Technology Support can also be reached at 410-313-7004.
Library Media Program
Mission & Vision Statements:
Mission Statement:
The mission of our school library media program is to promote literature
appreciation and information literacy among members of the school
community, thus fostering lifelong learning and enabling student
success.
Vision Statement:
With student success as the primary goal, the EMMS school library
media program will:
• create welcoming physical and social environments that celebrate
literature appreciation and openly promote lifelong learning and
intellectual freedom.
• provide high-quality, diverse, current resources in a variety of formats
to accommodate research, information inquiry, and leisure reading.
• educate its school community members on how to effectively locate,
use, and communicate information, thus cultivating confident and
responsible contributors of society.
• recognize the individual and tailor instruction, materials, and services
to meet the needs of all individuals who comprise the larger school
community.
• uphold the rights of every library patron to free access and
confidentiality.
• facilitate skill and content-based learning opportunities for students,
staff members, and all other users of the school library media center.
• supply both instruction and resources to students and staff that
support technological innovations in our increasingly global society.
• collaborate with teachers, administrators, and curriculum specialists to
develop authentic lessons and programs that foster student
achievement.
7
Philosophy of the
School Library Media Program
First and foremost, a school library media center should exude an appreciation for
learning and a passion for literature. It is the role of the media specialist to create an
environment filled with excitement and energy in the name of information. All
students, teachers, administrators, etc., will need to visit the media center at some
point for academic purposes, whether they are related to research or professional
development. Those who visit the media center of their own free will, those who
frequent the library for aesthetic reasons are much harder to come by. This population
is the media specialist’s challenge. People, children and adults alike, who value and
appreciate literature as a treasure and a precious commodity are few and far between.
Media specialists must address this mass, designing programs and outreach activities
to promote literacy and literature appreciation.
Without question, it is critical that a media center appeal to the demands of the general
school community and that it has the resources to accommodate research and
information inquiry. To this end, the school media center should be well-equipped
with a wealth of diverse resources. All genres of literature and all content disciplines
should be adequately represented. Texts, periodicals, audio-visual and electronic
resources should embody various cultures, social classes, schools of thought,
languages, and academic levels. It is the media specialist’s duty to ensure that her
media center houses resources that fulfill each student’s right to free access of
information. The media specialist must revise and update her collection based on the
needs and demands of the school community. It is critical for collections to be
current—particularly regarding nonfiction works—accurate, and reliable. Collections
should be organic, living and changing. To foster such growth, the media specialist
must stay connected with her community. Fluid and ongoing communication
between the media specialist and her students, her colleagues, her administration,
county curriculum specialists, and the outside community is essential.
To blossom into successful, knowledgeable, contributing members of society, students
must develop refined information retrieval and communication skills. In addition the
ensuring that the school community has access to a plethora of diverse information
resources, the media specialist must also facilitate the information location, retrieval,
and use processes. The library media program must educate its members on how to
effectively and efficiently locate and use information to accomplish a myriad of goals.
Library users must be afforded learning opportunities that educate them on how to
communicate their own ideas in a variety of formats. The school community should
master using technology as a vehicle of communication. Media specialists who
actively embrace the roles of teacher, instructional partner, information specialist, and
program administrator will only ensure meaningful experiences for all members of the
school community.
8
Collaborative Planning Guidelines:
As an instructional partner, the school library media specialist will
collaboratively plan, teach, and assess student lessons/units with classroom
teachers. Media specialists should initiate collaboration and willingly respond
to teacher requests for collaboration. The following steps are recommended
when planning a collaborative lesson or unit.
 The media specialist should informally question the classroom teacher
about his/her expectations for the collaborative project and ascertain the
general content and desired outcomes.
 The media specialist and the classroom teacher should set a specific time to
meet to plan the collaborative lesson. At this time, the media specialist should
give the teacher a copy of the collaborative planning form s/he intends to use
during the planning session so the classroom teacher can properly prepare.
 The media specialist and classroom teacher will complete the collaborative
planning form together during the scheduled meeting time. They will also set
specific dates and times for the lesson(s) and sign out in the Media Center
Scheduling Binder. The media specialist will also make a photocopy of the
completed collaborative planning form to send with the classroom teacher.
 At the end of the collaborative lesson, the media specialist and classroom
teacher should set aside time to complete a collaboration evaluation together
so improvements, if any, can be made for the following year.
A recommended Collaborative Planning Form and Collaboration Evaluation
are included on pages 10-12 in this handbook.
9
Collaborative Planning Form (front):
Media Specialist’s Name: ___________________________
Today’s Date ________
Teacher’s Name: __________________________________
Grade Level(s) _______
Subject Area & Unit: ______________________________________________________________
Library Media Objective(s):
Subject Area Objective(s):
1.
1.
2.
2.
Authentic Assessment/Final Product:
Resources Needed:
Description of Final Product:
Books:
Databases/Websites:
Lesson Dates:
Final Product Due Date:
Periodicals:
Student Handouts: Y/N
Attached?
Y/N
Software:
Special Accommodations:
Other A/V materials:
A/V Equipment Needed:
_____ LCD Projector
_____ Printer
_____ Overhead Projector _____ Speakers
_____ Video Camera
_____ Other:
_____ Computer Lab _____ Mobile Lab
_____ Digital Camera _____ Tripod
10
Collaborative Planning Form (back):
Media Specialist’s Responsibilities:
Content Teacher’s Responsibilities:
Warm Up:
Prior Knowledge/Skills Needed:
Assessment Overview:
Rubric?
Y/N
Attached? Y/N
Additional Notes:
11
Collaboration Evaluation:
Media Specialist’s Name: ___________________________
Today’s Date ________
Teacher’s Name: __________________________________
Grade Level(s) _______
Collaborative Lesson/Project: ______________________________________________________
What worked well in this collaborative lesson?
Suggestions for improvement:
Was this lesson enhanced through collaboration?
_____ Yes
_____ No
Was this lesson successful enough to warrant doing it again in the future?
_____ Yes
_____ No
How well did the library media center collection respond to the unit objectives?
Scale:
5 = Excellent
4 = Above Average
3 = Average
2 = Below Average
1 = Poor
___ diversity of formats (books, audiovisual, electronic)
___ recency (books and materials up to date?)
___ relevance of collection to unit needs
___ duplication (enough materials for the number of students taught?)
___ reading/viewing/listening levels meet students' needs?
___ average of above ratings
12
This Collaboration Evaluation has been adapted from a collaborative unit evaluation found at
http://www.forks.wednet.edu/fhsmain/Library/Collaboration%20forms/collaborative_unit_evaluation.htm
Acceptable Use of Computer
Technology Policy:
Acceptable Use of Computer Technology:
In order to use the computers and the Internet at EMMS, students MUST
have a completed and signed parental consent form. Students may use the
Internet ONLY under the supervision of a teacher. Students can access
approved websites through the ikeepbookmarks site
<http://ww2.ikeepbookmarks.com/browse.asp?account=951&clientWidt
h=0>. Only kid-safe search engines may be used at school! See pages 1415 in this handbook for the middle school consent letter and permission
slip.
13
CO M PUTER US A GE GUIDE L INES FOR M IDDLE SCHOO L
STUDENTS
Th e How a rd Count y Pub lic Schoo l S y s te m is please d to pro vi d e s tud e nt s w ith r es ourc es to im pro v e th e ir te chno log y a nd
inform ati on lite ra c y a nd e nh a nc e lea rn ing . In a n ef for t to m a int ai n our e qu ipm e n t a n d e n s ur e th at s tud e nt s a re a cc es si ng
a ppropr ia te res ourc es on th e Int e rn e t, th e fo llo wi ng HCPSS p o lic ies w ill b e e nf o rc e d. W e re qu es t th a t y ou re v ie w a nd
d is cu ss th is docum e nt w ith y ou r ch ild , sign it, a nd ret u rn the completed
fo rm to y o u r Hom e room Teache r i m mediat e ly .
Y ou m a y k ee p p a g e on e as a r e fe re nc e .
Com put e r U sa g e Gu id e lin es
1.
2.
3.
I w ill b e res pon sib le fo r m y b e h a v ior o n th e s choo l com put er n e twork.
I w ill no t r e v eal p e rs on all y id e nt ifia b le i nfo rm a tion , s uch as hom e phon e num b e rs , a ddr es ses or s oc ial s e cur ity
num b e rs .
I w ill a cc es s on ly tho se r es ourc es f o r wh ich I h a v e obt ai n e d pe rm iss ion, u sing th e a ccount as si gn e d to m e. I w ill
not cr ea te, a cc es s , down lo a d, s tor e, or p rin t files , m es sa g es or im a g es th a t:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
n.
o.
p.
q.
r.
s.
t.
u.
v.
w.
D e p ict prof a n ity , ob s c e n ity , th e u se o f w ea po n s , or v iole nc e ,
Prom ot e u se o f tob a cco, drug s , a lcoho l, o r oth er ille g al o r h ar m fu l p roduct s .
Cont ai n se x u all y s ugg es tiv e m es sa g es .
Ar e se x u all y e x p lic it or ob s c e n e .
D e p ict g a ng a ffiliati on.
Cont ai n la ngu a g e or s y m bo ls th a t d e m ea n a n id e n ti fiable p ers on o r group o r oth e rwise in fring e on th e
right s o f oth e rs .
C a u se or a re lik el y to c a u se a s ub s ta nt ial o r m a te ria l d is rupt io n to s choo l a ct ivi ties o r th e o rd e rly op e ra tion
of th e s choo l
Cont ai n rud e, d is res p e ctfu l, o r d is court e ou s e x pr es si on s incon sis te nt w ith c iv il d is cour se a nd b e h a v ior.
I w ill u se th e com put e r h a rdw a re, s oftw a re a nd rel a te d e qu ipm e nt fo r e duc a tion al purpo ses on ly .
I w ill u se a ll com put er h a rdw a re , s of tw a re a nd r ela te d e qu ip m e nt w ith prop e r c a re .
I w ill on ly e nt e r th e com put er la b wh e n a tea ch e r is p res e nt .
I w ill a cc es s com put e rs as in st ruct e d b y a tea ch e r.
I w ill u se on ly au thor ize d s oftw a re in th e com put er la b.
I w ill no t in s ta ll s o ftw a re on s choo l s y s te m e qu ipm e n t.
I w ill n e ith e r gi v e nor re c ei v e un a uthor ize d as sis ta nc e r elati ng to h a rdw a re o r s oftw a re .
I w ill on ly a cc es s inform a tio n th at is d ire ct ly r ela te d to th e class ob je ct iv es .
I w ill no t cop y a n y s oftw a re o r f iles u se d in s choo l or b el ong in g to a noth er s tud e nt.
I w ill p rin t m y w o rk b y p e rm iss ion on ly .
I w ill lea v e m y work a rea n ea t a nd c lea n.
I w ill b e res pon sib le fo r m y own e le ctron ic f iles .
I w ill re por t a n y h a rdw a re o r s of tw a re m a lfunct ion s to th e i n s tructor dur ing th e c las s p e riod in wh ich it is
not ic e d.
I w ill no t u se e m ai l o r ch a t room s .
I w ill ref rai n from h a v ing food, d rink, gu m or c a nd y in th e co m put e r la b.
V io la tion o f Po lic y
U se of com put er h a rdw a re, s oftw a re a nd th e I nt e rn et is a s tu d e nt pr iv ile g e, not a ri ght. In a pprop ria te u se as ou tli n e d
a bo v e m a y res u lt in th e lo ss o f th es e p ri v ile g es .
1.
If a v io la tio n of th is po lic y is s u s p e ct e d, th e v io la tion s hou ld be re port e d to th e a ppropr ia te a dm in ist ra to r o r
s up e rv is or fo r in v es tig a tion.
2.
Th e Schoo l Adm in is tr a tor , S y s te m Ad m i n ist ra to r, o r th e S e cu ri ty Coord in a tor m a y in v es tig a te s u s p e ct e d v io la tion s
as a ppropr ia te .
3.
In c as es th a t a re lik el y to b e c ri m in a l in n a tur e (thr ea ts , s tal k ing, h a ras s m e nt, e tc. ), th e S e cur ity Coord in a to r
s hou ld b e cont a ct e d for a d v ic e a nd/o r in v es tig a tive res pon sib ility , in coop e rati on w ith th e S y s tem Adm in is tr a to r.
4.
If it is d e ter m in e d th at a v io la tion o f th e p o lic y h as occurr e d, s tud e nt s m a y b e d is c ip lin e d u sing th e How a rd Count y
Stud e nt Cod e of Conduct an in Accord a nc e w ith Po lic y 9200, D is c ip lin e.
Th is Po licy h as b ee n adapt ed fro m th e How a rd Count y Pub lic Schoo l S ystem Po licy #8080. To down load a cop y o f th e
off icial count y po licy, visit http : //www.h
c pss.o r g / b o a r d /p olicies/policies_
80 00.sh t ml .
14
ELLICOTT
M ILLS M IDDLE SCHOOL
INTERNET/CO
M PUTER
I,
US E POLICY
, u nders tan d and w il l ab ide b y th e
(pr in t stude n t n am e)
ab o v e Tec hn olo g y C ode o f E th ics . I furth er u nde rstan d t hat a n y v io latio n o f th e regu latio ns
li sted abo v e m ay ter mi n ate my access pr iv il eges.
I u nders tan d t h at sc h oo l d isc ip li n ar y
ac tio n an d/ o r appr op riate lega l ac tio n m ay b e take n as we ll .
Pr in t St ude n t Na m e:
H o m er oo m :
Grade:
S tude n t S ig nature :
Da te:
Pr in t P are nt/Guard ian Na m e:
Pare n t/Guard ian S ign ature :
RETURN THIS
Da te:
P AGE TO Y OUR HO M EROO M TEACHER
IMM E DIA T ELY, P LEASE.
15
Academic Integrity:
Whenever you use someone else’s ideas in your own writing, you must give
credit to your sources. Copying another person’s (or group of people’s) ideas
or words without giving credit is stealing. This form of academic dishonesty is
called plagiarism. This is a serious offense that has serious consequences.
HOW DO I AVOID PLAGIARIZING?
1) EDUCATE YOURSELF ABOUT PLAGIARISM & COPYRIGHT
VIOLATIONS
2) PRACTICE PARAPHRASING AND SUMMARIZING
3) GIVE CREDIT TO THE AUTHOR(S) VIA IN-TEXT CITATIONS, BY
USING QUOTATION MARKS APPROPRIATELY, & BY
INCLUDING A BIBLIOGRAPHY PAGE
Helpful Websites about Plagiarism:
http://www.indiana.edu/%7Ewts/pamphlets/plagiarism.shtml
(Indiana University site about plagiarism; offers examples)
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/01/
(The OWL at Purdue--strategies for avoiding plagiarism)
http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/plagiarism.html
(Student handout from the UNC-Chapel Hill Writing Center)
Howard County Middle School Writing Stylebook
(Each student and staff member should be given a gold stylebook at the
beginning of the school year. The stylebook excerpt on academic integrity is
included on the following page in this media handbook.)
16
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
ÒH o w ca n I b e h o norab le ab o u t using info r ma tion I ha v e colle c te d fo r assig n m e nts?Ó
A ll o f us have a resp onsibili ty to give cred it t o a source of inform atio n w hen we use it. If
you d onÕt g ive cred it to the source (w hether it is an i ndividua l or a group of pe ople), you
are prese nting t he inform ation as if you crea ted it.
T his is a f orm of acade mi c dishones ty w ith a spec ial nam eÑ P LAGIARIS
M.
T here are tw o types of plag iar ism :
 acc ide ntal
 de li bera te
Accidenta l p lagia rism is often t he resu lt o f sloppy w ork li ke forge tting t o pu t qu otation s
m arks ar ound a qu ote , forge tt in g to give cred it to a source, n ot qu ot ing som ethin g
accura tely , or g iving cred it to the wr ong source.
De libe rate p lagia ris m m ea ns t hat a pers on h as t he intention of being dishones t li ke
buyi n g an ass ignm ent o nli ne, c opyi n g w ork from anot her stude nt, tu rning in som eone
else Õs w ork as his/ her o w n, or cu tt ing -and-pas tin g par ts o f ideas and p re tending t hey are
original.
Be sure you understand how to give credit
for in for m ation
before you turn i n a n assign m ent.
o
o
o
o
L ear n
L ear n
L ear n
L ear n
how
how
how
how
to
to
to
to
pa raph rase
di rec t quote
su mm arize
cit e sou rces
Reme m b e r :
If you copy ot her pe opleÕs w ork, you are stea li ng. Wh en you donÕt do your ow n w ork ,
you d onÕt lear n m uch, and t he farther you ge t a long in sc hoo l, the harde r it w ill ge t.
17
Excerpted from the Howard County Middle School Writing Stylebook (p. 19)
Copyright @ School
THE INTERNET
Do’s and Don’ts of Copyright Issues for Educators
The information contained in this document is not a complete summary of
copyright laws. It was created by the HCPSS Library Media Advisory Committee
and is intended to provide some information for teachers and library media
specialists to use when they are faced with copyright questions.
Adapted from Copyright for Schools A Practical Guide Third Edition by Carol Simpson
Internet
According to Copyright for Schools (Linworth, 2001), “Web-based material is
copyrighted just as print and audiovisual materials are, and notification of
copyright status is not required. Small portions of Web documents may be used by
teachers in class if there is not sufficient time to secure permission, just as with print
materials. Large chunks of images, documents, and Web sites should not be taken
without prior consent.
Since there is greater latitude or student use of copyrighted materials, they may also
use modest portions of Web documents as long as the copies they make belong to
them. Teachers may not keep copies of originals of works made by students in
which they incorporate materials copied from the Internet. The copies made from
the Internet must reside with the student.”
Internet Use Guidelines At-a-Glance
Before copying verbatim from an Internet site, you must analyze and evaluate every
use in light of the general guidelines. Each of the four tests of fair use must be
considered.
• Purpose of the use - nonprofit, educational use
• Character of the use - factual material (common facts, lists, statistics) has more
latitude of use than creative property (stories, poems, artwork, web design)
• Amount of material copied (extent) - the more of an item you plan to use the more
you need direct permission from the author/owner
• Effect of use on the market for the work - downloading a webpage in its entirety
for perpetual use would deprive the author/owner of the ability to keep the
material current and any profits generated from repeated viewing online.
A good rule of thumb is to ask permission from the author/owner to use any of the
components of a webpage. These requests can easily be made by email, telephone
or written correspondence.
18
Copyright @ School
THE INTERNET (cont’d)
The author of an e-mail message owns the content of that message. You as the
recipient may not make copies of that message or forward it without the consent of
the original author. “Keep private e-mail private unless you have express
permission of the original writer. It’s good manners; it’s good practice.” (Simpson,
2001)
When downloading graphics from the Internet, it is necessary to refer to the four
tests of fair use.
Examples
A teacher would like to upload his/her students work onto the school server so that
others may view the work.
It is recommended that teachers obtain written permission from the student before uploading
original work.
A teacher is developing a webpage to support instruction in the classroom. She
would like to include links to other webpages on her page.
Including links to other pages is acceptable, however, it is recommended that you obtain
permission before publishing.
A teacher locates an interesting webpage to use with her class and would like to
share it with the other teachers in her school.
Rather than distributing photocopies of the site, the teacher should provide the URL so that
teachers who are interested may access the site.
19
Copyright @ School
MULTIMEDIA
Do’s and Don’ts of Copyright Issues for Educators
The information contained in this document is not a complete summary of
copyright laws. It was created by the HCPSS Library Media Advisory Committee
and is intended to provide some information for teachers and library media
specialists to use when they are faced with copyright questions.
Adapted from Copyright for Schools A Practical Guide Third Edition by Carol Simpson
Multimedia
Working with multimedia is like walking through a copyright minefield. Users
encounter many different issues when working with music, video, digital images,
animations, etc. When repurposing multimedia property, it is necessary to get
permission from the author/owner.
Multimedia Guidelines At-a-Glance
Students and teachers may use copyrighted material in multimedia presentations if
quantity limits are observed.
• Motion Media (film, video, television): Up to 10 percent or three minutes,
whichever is less, of an individual program.
• Text (prose, poetry, drama): Up to 10 percent or 1000 words, whichever is less, of
a novel, story, play, or long poem. Short poems less than 250 words may be
used in their entirety.
• Music, lyrics, and music video: Up to 10 percent but not more than 30 seconds
from a single work. If a video clip has music in the background and you can’t
separate the music from the visual material, you will be restricted by the 30
second limitation for music.
• Illustrations, cartoons and photographs: A work may be used in its entirety but
only if no more than five images from a single artist or photographer are used
in a multimedia work.
• Numerical data sets (computer databases or spreadsheets): Up to 10 percent or
2,500 fields or cells, whichever is less.
An educator may make only two copies (including the original) of the multimedia
work. An additional copy may be made if one of the copies is lost, stolen, or
damaged. If more than one person creates the multimedia work, each may have
one copy of the work.
Recommendation
Invest in clip art, music, and video sold expressly for multimedia productions or
create your own. The multimedia collections are always copyright-cleared for such
applications.
20
Copyright @ School
MULTIMEDIA (cont’d)
Examples
A teacher would like to take a student’s multimedia project to an inservice
workshop outside of the school system to use as an example. Does the teacher need
to obtain the student’s and parent’s permission?
If the student did all of the work on the project and there is no copyrighted material included
in the project that the student did not create, the permission of the student and parent is all
that is required. If however, the project includes copyrighted material used by the student
under the multimedia fair use guidelines, only the student may use the project for
workshops. The teacher may not retain copies of the work for any reason.
A principal would like to use a popular “top 40-type” song in a PowerPoint
presentation. Does the principal need to obtain permission for this?
The principal can use up to 30 seconds of the song without permission. The presentation
may be retained for two years from the date of its first use. The first slide of the presentation
must contain a statement similar to this: “This presentation contains copyrighted material
used under the educational fair use exemption to U.S. Copyright law”. The last slide of the
program must include a mediagraphy that includes the copyright information (copyright
date and copyright holder) for each piece of copyrighted material used in the presentation.
Copyright Resources for Further Information
Books
• Simpson, Carol. Copyright for Schools A Practical Guide, 3rd edition. Linworth
Publishing, Inc., 2001.
• Talab, R.S. Commonsense Copyright: A Guide for Educators and Librarians.
McFarland & Co., 1999.
Websites
Software and Information Industry Association
Software Use & the Law
www.siia.net/piracy/copyright/law.asp
U.S. Copyright Office
www.lcweb.loc.gov/copyright
A Visit to Copyright Bay
http://www.stfrancis.edu/cid/copyrightbay/
21
Privacy & Confidentiality:
The Ellicott Mills Media Center supports all patrons’ rights to privacy and
confidentiality, adhering to the principles stated in the Code of Ethics of the
American Library Association. The principle referring to privacy is quoted
below. To access the complete ALA Code of Ethics, visit
http://www.ala.org/ala/oif/statementspols/codeofethics/codeethics.cfm
III.
We protect each library user's right to privacy and confidentiality with
respect to information sought or received and resources consulted,
borrowed, acquired or transmitted.
- ALA Code of Ethics
Howard County Public School System Policy #9050 dealing with Student
Records and Confidentiality can be downloaded at
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_9000.shtml.
26
Howard County Public School System
Library Media Essential Curriculum: Grades 6-8
Goal 1: The students at all grade levels 6-8 will demonstrate an appreciation of literature as a
reflection of human experience and reading as a pleasurable activity.
Literature Appreciation
Objective – The student will be able to:
a. Identify relationships between text and situations in real life.
1. Select and read age-appropriate fiction titles that reflect personal
interests as well as validation of own experiences and concerns.
2. Expand use of text-to-text and text-to-world connections to explore the
impact of works of literature on readers and society.
3. Explore techniques authors use to encourage readers to examine and
question their own behaviors and beliefs.
4. Use informational materials to examine issues and questions related to
human experiences throughout history.
b. Use libraries to facilitate development of good reading habits.
1. Utilize circulation procedures and policies to effectively and efficiently
access reading materials.
2. Choose to browse, select, and enjoy library materials.
 (Method: Collaborate with teachers to provide time for students to
interact with books from the library media center.)
c. Experience the pleasure of recreational reading.
1. Choose to read independently.
 (Method: Book-talk titles to spark student interest in reading.)
 (Method: Provide opportunities for readers to discuss with each other
books they have read for fun.)
 (Method: Sponsor reading incentive activities.)
 (Method: Share experiences from own life demonstrating the pleasure
of reading.)
2. Use age-appropriate periodicals for recreational reading.
d. Recognize the connection between reading and being a lifelong learner.
1. Expand comprehension of the connection between the ability to read
and success in daily life.
 (Method: Share examples demonstrating the importance of lifelong
learning and reading in the context of daily life.)
 (Method: Invite community members to share experiences as lifelong
learners and readers in careers and areas of personal interest.)
 (Method: Provide examples of the need to keep learning beyond
formal schooling.)
2. Practice and apply skills needed to become an independent learner.
3. Continue to take ownership of learning by setting goals focusing on
aspects of becoming an independent, lifelong learner.
27
Howard County Public School System
Library Media Essential Curriculum: Grades 6-8 (cont’d)
Goal 2: The students at all grade levels 6-8 will demonstrate the ability to use resources, in a wide
variety of formats, to locate information to meet an identified need.
Locate Information
Objective – The student will be able to:
a. Define and refine an information need by formulating compelling/effective
questions.
1. Continue to practice developing effective research questions.
 (Method: Provide practice in identifying keywords to determine what a
question is really asking.)
 (Method: Provide experiences analyzing what a question is asking and
evaluating answers in terms of how well they match what was asked for in
the question.)
2. Analyze criteria of an assignment to generate effective questions.
3. Analyze topics of personal interest to generate effective questions.
b. Use systems of classification to identify, locate, and retrieve materials to meet
current need.
1. Increase knowledge of call numbers.
2. Independently make appropriate selections of narrative (fiction) and
expository (nonfiction) materials to meet current need.
c. Match resources to topic of interest or need.
1. Generate effective searches when using the automated catalog.
2. Continue to expand use of computer/online/digital resources.
3. Develop independence in locating relevant information in all formats.
4. Increase knowledge of advantages and disadvantages of using print,
nonprint, and computer/online/digital resources to practice selecting the
most appropriate resource for their current need.
28
Howard County Public School System
Library Media Essential Curriculum: Grades 6-8 (cont’d)
Goal 3: The students at all grade levels 6-8 will demonstrate the ability to collect information
relevant to the current information need.
Collect Information
Objective – The student will be able to:
a. Use print resources effectively and efficiently.
1. Apply strategies for collecting relevant information from print resources,
recognizing issues related to access of information.
 (Method: Review pros and cons of using a print source for locating
information to meet specific needs.)
2. Review and apply use of search terms and strategies for using print resources.
 (Method: Address need to recognize relevant terms in the index, need to
interpret standard formats and symbols used in indexes, need to generate
related terms.)
b. Use nonprint resources effectively and efficiently.
1. Choose to use nonprint resources when appropriate, applying concepts related
to access, currency, and accuracy of information.
 (Method: Analyze different formats of nonprint resources to identify their
advantages and disadvantages for use.)
2. Utilize effective search strategies when using nonprint resources.
c. Use computer/online/digital resources effectively and efficiently.
1. Apply expanded strategies for collecting relevant information from
computer/online/digital resources, applying concepts related to access of
information.
 (Method: Expand use of different types of searches using both basic and
advanced search modes.)
2. Continue generating and applying search terminology and strategies for using
computer/online/digital resources.
 (Method: Address need to generate own search term, provide links to
related topics, include materials related to multiple meanings of term used,
e.g., colonies returns hits on ants and space as well as political context, etc.)
 (Method: Continue to provide practice applying concepts related to Boolean
searching.)
d. Evaluate the content of specific print resources to determine accuracy and
relevance of content.
1. Apply criteria related to determining authority of author, accuracy and
currency of information to select appropriate print resources to meet current
need.
2. Apply strategies for determining relevance of information collected in
relationship to what is asked for in the question.
29
Howard County Public School System
Library Media Essential Curriculum: Grades 6-8 (cont’d)
Goal 3: The students at all grade levels 6-8 will demonstrate the ability to collect information
relevant to the current information need.
Collect Information
Objective – The student will be able to:
e. Evaluate the content of specific nonprint resources to determine accuracy and
relevance of content.
1. Apply criteria related to determining authority of author, accuracy, and
currency of information to select appropriate nonprint resources to meet
current
need.
2. Apply strategies for determining relevance of information collected in
relationship to what is asked for in the question.
f. Evaluate the content of specific computer/online/digital resources to determine
accuracy and relevance of content.
1. Apply criteria related to determining authority of author, accuracy, and
currency of information to select appropriate computer/online/digital
resources to meet current need.
2. Apply strategies for determining relevance of information collected in
relationship to what is asked for in the question.
g. Use appropriate graphic organizers to record relevant information.
1. Use graphic organizers (e.g., note cards, webbing and outlining) in print
formats.
2. Use graphic organizers in electronic formats (e.g., Inspiration).
h. Use original words to capture concepts and avoid plagiarism.
1. Paraphrase/summarize relevant information.
2. Expand use of technology to facilitate appropriate note-taking.
 (Method: Discuss appropriate types of notes and their functions including
summary, paraphrase, list, quotation, observation, dialectic journal, etc.)
 (Method: Collaborate with teachers to discourage plagiarism and assess all
steps in the research process by evaluating notes, rough draft, and
bibliography as well as the final product.)
i. Record appropriate bibliographic information to cite sources.
1. Determine needed bibliographic information.
2. Use an accepted style for formatting required citations.
30
Howard County Public School System
Library Media Essential Curriculum: Grades 6-8 (cont’d)
Goal 4: The students at all grade levels 6-8 will demonstrate the ability to use appropriate print,
nonprint and computer/online/digital formats to organize and manage data/information.
Organize and Manage Data/Information
Objective – The student will be able to:
a. Identify appropriate formats for displaying and managing data/information.
1. Discuss advantages and disadvantages of various formats for displaying the
data/information.
2. Record and organize data/information using a variety of formats; i.e., text,
graph, web, graphic organizer, database, spreadsheet.
b. Interpret data/information displayed in a variety of formats.
1. Interpret data/information in a variety of formats.
2. Examine samples of the same data/information displayed in a variety of
formats and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each in terms of ease
of interpretation.
c. Match appropriate strategy/format with structure of content to be organized.
 (Method: Discuss possible strategies for organizing data/information and the
characteristics of each; i.e., alphabetical order, chronological order, part to
whole, general to specific, main idea and supporting details, compare/contrast,
cause and effect, categorizing, etc.)
31
Howard County Public School System
Library Media Essential Curriculum: Grades 6-8 (cont’d)
Goal 5: The students at all grade levels 6-8 will demonstrate the ability to interpret information to
generate new understanding and knowledge.
Interpret Information
Objective – The student will be able to:
a. Analyze content of data/information and resources.
1. Apply strategies to determine ideas being communicated in a variety of
resources.
 (Method: Collaborate with teachers to provide experiences for students to
identify the intended message of a story, passage, or video segment.)
2. Apply strategies to identify evidence of bias or point of view.
 (Method: Collaborate with teachers to provide experiences for students to
identify an author’s point of view or bias as communicated in a story,
passage, or video segment.)
b. Apply critical thinking and problem solving strategies.
1. Apply strategies for identifying patterns and relationships.
2. Apply strategies for drawing conclusions.
3. Apply strategies for making valid inferences.
4. Apply strategies for visualizing.
5. Apply strategies for divergent thinking.
6. Apply strategies for making personal connections with information.
7. Apply strategies to facilitate comprehension, analysis, and synthesis.
32
Collection Development & Selection Policy:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Collection Development:
Developing the library media center collection is primarily the responsibility of
the library media specialist, who, along with other staff members, will evaluate a
variety of materials and select materials based upon the curriculum and the
objectives of the school. The Coordinator of Media and Educational Technology
and the Library Media Instructional Facilitator will provide guidance regarding
a countywide Collection Development Plan and guidance for individual schools.
Selected materials will then be ordered following standard prescribed
procedures.
Evaluation and Selection:
School library media collections should meet current MD state standards and
should conform as nearly as possible to the American Library Association
standards. After the basic collection is acquired, additional materials should be
selected to support the curriculum and new or special programs, to enrich all
phases of school activities, to give depth to the collection, and to update and
replace materials as needed.
The Howard County policy regarding the selection of instructional materials,
including those placed in the library media centers, is the primary source for
selection criteria. Materials at the appropriate grade level may be selected from
the following:
*
*
*
*
*
Approved List of Bibliographic Sources and Reviewing Journals
Blanket Approval - sources of consistently high quality materials
Central AV Library
Public Access Catalog for the Howard County Public School System
List of resources in approved curriculum guides, including those for
approved pilot programs
* List of materials pertaining to an approved textbook, when the materials
are an integral part of the textbook series and published by the same
publisher (e.g., audio tapes, compact discs, computer software, kits,
transparencies, and videotapes).
33
Collection Development & Selection Policy:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Evaluation and Selection (cont’d):
Any materials not reviewed in approved selection aids may be purchased upon
favorable evaluation by three professionals, using the established Selection
Criteria for Media Center Materials form. One form including all three
signatures is acceptable. Use a separate form for each item purchased.
In addition to observing the evaluation and selection policies established by The
Howard County Board of Education, the library media specialist should also be
aware of the suggestions of the American Association of School Librarians,
which reaffirm its belief in the Library Bill of Rights of the American Library
Association. Whenever it does not conflict with county policy, it is the
responsibility of the library media center:
“To provide a comprehensive collection of instructional materials selected in
compliance with basic written selection principles, and to provide maximum
accessibility to these materials.
To provide materials that will support the curriculum, taking into
consideration the individual’s needs, and the varied interests, abilities,
socioeconomic backgrounds, and maturity levels of the students served.
To provide materials for teachers and students that will encourage growth in
knowledge, and that will develop literary, cultural and aesthetic appreciation,
and ethical standards.
To provide materials which reflect the ideas and beliefs of religious, social,
political, historical, and ethnic groups and their contribution to the American
and world heritage and culture, thereby enabling students to develop an
intellectual integrity in forming judgments.
To provide a written statement, approved by the local Boards of Education, of
the procedures for meeting the challenge of censorship of materials in school
library media centers.
To provide qualified professional personnel to serve teachers and students.”
School Libraries, vol. 19, no. 2, p.61
34
Collection Development & Selection Policy:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Media Materials on Family Life and Human Sexuality and HIV/AIDS:
Audiovisual Materials:
The K-12 Health Education Office will provide library media specialists with an
approved list of audiovisual materials that may be purchased for library media
collections that deal with these topics. Each fall an updated list will be
distributed to all library media specialists and to the Manager of Media
Technical Services. Library media specialists should not purchase audiovisual
materials that deal with these topics if they are not on the approved list. If a
library media specialist would like to have a specific title added to the approved
list, recommendations should be made to the K-12 Health Education Office.
Books:
When ordering books, both fiction and nonfiction, that deal with HIV/AIDS,
sexuality, and family life, library media specialists should always check the
review sources to make sure that the materials are consistent with the health
curriculum and appropriate for the grade level. After the materials arrive in the
school, library media specialists should look through them to ensure that the
materials are appropriate for the library media collection. If a library media
specialist has any questions about whether or not to include an item in the
collection, the Coordinator of Media and Educational Technology should be
contacted. These materials will then be referred to the K-12 Health Education
Office to determine if they should be included in the library media collection.
35
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
36
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
37
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
38
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
39
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
40
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
41
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
42
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
43
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
44
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
45
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
46
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
47
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
48
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
49
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
50
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
51
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
52
To download an official copy of Policy #8040,visit
http://www.hcpss.org/board/policies/policies_8000.shtml
53
54
55
56
57
APPROVED LIST OF BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
AND REVIEWING JOURNALS
A favorable review of any title in one of the following reviewing journals, or inclusion
of that title in one of the following bibliographic sources, constitutes approval of the
title for addition to library media center collections in the Howard County Public
School System for use at the level(s) indicated.
TITLE:
LEVEL:
AAAS Science Book List for Children (Hilary J. Deason)
EM
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Adventuring with Books (National Council of Teachers of English)
EM
TITLE:
LEVEL:
American Biology Teachers (National Assn. of Biology Teachers)
H
Periodical
TITLE:
Appraisal: Science Books for Young People (Children’s Science Book
Review Committee)
EMH
Periodical
LEVEL:
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Best Books for Children (John T. Gillespie)
EM
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Best Books for Junior High Readers (John T. Gillespie)
H
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Best Books for Senior High Readers (John T. Gillespie)
MH
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Best Books for Young Adult Readers (John T. Gillespie)
MH
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Best Books for Young Teen Readers (John T. Gillespie)
MH
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Black Experience in Children’s Books (New York Public Library)
EM
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Book Bait (Elinor Walker)
MH
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Booklist (American Library Association)
EMH
Periodical
58
APPROVED LIST OF BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
AND REVIEWING JOURNALS (cont’d)
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Books for the Teen Age (New York Public Library)
MH
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Books for You (National Council of Teachers of English)
H
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (University of Chicago)
EM
Periodical
TITLE:
Childhood Education: Infancy Through Early Adolescence
(Assn. for Childhood Education)
E
Periodical
LEVEL:
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Children and Books (Zena Sutherland)
E
TITLE:
Children’s Books of the Year (Child Study Children’s Book
Committee)
EM
Annotated Guide
LEVEL:
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Children’s Books Too Good To Miss (May Hill Arbuthnot)
EM
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Children’s Catalog (H.W. Wilson)
EM
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Children’s Literature in the Elementary School (Charlotte S. Huck)
E
TITLE:
Children’s Software & New Media Revue (Active Learning
Associates, Inc.)
EMH
Periodical
LEVEL:
TITLE:
LEVEL:
TITLE:
LEVEL:
CHOICE: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries (American Library
Association)
H
Guide to Reference Materials for School Library Media Centers
(Barbara Ripp Safford)
EMH
59
APPROVED LIST OF BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
AND REVIEWING JOURNALS (cont’d)
TITLE:
LEVEL:
TITLE:
LEVEL:
High Interest - Easy Reading for Junior and Senior High School
Students (Marian White)
MH
High/Low Handbook: Best Books and Web Sites for Reluctant Teen
Readers. 4th edition. (Libraries Unlimited)
MH
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Horn Book Magazine (The Horn Book, Inc.)
EM
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Instructor (Scholastic Inc.)
E
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Journal of Aesthetic Education (University of Illinois Press)
H
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Journal of Geography (National Council of Geographic Education)
MH
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Kirkus Reviews (The Kirkus Service)
EMH
Periodical
TITLE:
Learning & Leading with Technology (International Council for
Computers in Education)
EMH
Periodical
LEVEL:
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Learning: Resources for Successful Teaching (The Education Center)
E
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Library Media Connection (LMC) (Linworth Publishing Co.)
EMH
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Literature for Today’s Young Adults (Kenneth L. Donelson)
MH
60
APPROVED LIST OF BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
AND REVIEWING JOURNALS (cont’d)
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Media and Methods: Educational Products, Technologies and
Programs for Schools and Universities (American Society of
Educators)
MH
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Middle and Junior High School Library Catalog (H. W. Wilson)
MH
TITLE:
Modern Language Journal (National Federation of Modern Language
Teachers Assns.)
EMH
Periodical
LEVEL:
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Multimedia & Internet @ Schools (Information Today, Inc.)
EMH
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Natural History (American Museum of Natural History)
EMH
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Newbery and Caldecott Medal Books (ALA)
EMH
TITLE:
Paperback Books for Children (Child Study Children’s Book
Committees)
EMH
LEVEL:
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Physics Teacher (American Association of Physics Teachers)
EMH
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Reading Teacher (International Reading Assn.)
EM
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Reference and Research Book News (Fred Gullette)
H
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Reference and Subscription Book Reviews (American Library Assn.)
EMH
61
APPROVED LIST OF BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
AND REVIEWING JOURNALS (cont’d)
TITLE:
LEVEL:
TITLE:
LEVEL:
School Library Media Quarterly (American Association of School
Librarians, ALA)
EMH
Periodical
Science Books & Films [SB&F] (American Association for the
Advancement of Science)
EMH
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Scientific American (Scientific American, Inc.)
EMH
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
SciTech Book News (Fred Gullette)
H
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Senior High School Library Catalog (H.W. Wilson)
H
TITLE:
LEVEL:
School Library Journal [SLJ] (American Library Association)
EMH
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Teaching Exceptional Children (The Council for Exceptional Children)
EMH
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Teaching preK-8 (Allen Raymond, Inc.)
EM
Periodical
TITLE:
Tech Trends - For Leaders in Education and Training (Assn. for
Educational Communication and Technology)
EMH
Periodical
LEVEL:
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Technology and Learning (Miller Freeman Inc.)
EMH
Periodical
TITLE:
LEVEL:
Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA) (Scarecrow Press, Inc.)
MH
Periodical
TITLE:
Your Library: A Reference Guide (William A. Katz)
LEVEL:
MH
62
BLANKET APPROVAL LIST FOR SELECTION
MATERIALS
These ar e sources of instructional mate rials w hose publications ar e of such
consistently high qua
lity that indiv idua l eval uation of each item is not necessar y.
Materials from such sources are g iven blanke t approval fo r a d ditio n to librar y
media cente r co llections i n the How ard Coun ty Pub lic School System. B lanket
approval is given to materi als from the follo w ing sources:
Childrens Press
5440 North Cumberla
Chicago, I L 60656
nd Avenue
Howar d County Public School System
Al l material s supporting an approv ed
pilot program
Howar d County Public School System
Union Lis t of Pe riodic als
National Geograp
hic Society
17th and M Streets
, NW
Washington, DC 20036
State of Maryland
Materials issue d b y state agencies
U. S . Government Printin g Office
710 N . Capita l Street, NW
Washington, DC 20402
Weston Woods Studios
Weston, CT 06680
63
APPROVED LIST OF PERIODICALS
Key:
E = Elementary M = Middle School H = High School P = Professional Resource
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
(Appendix) http://www.howard.k12.md.us/met/media/handbook/appendix/periodicals.html
64
APPROVED LIST OF PERIODICALS (cont’d)
Key:
E = Elementary M = Middle School H = High School P = Professional Resource
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
(Appendix) http://www.howard.k12.md.us/met/media/handbook/appendix/periodicals.html
65
APPROVED LIST OF PERIODICALS (cont’d)
Key:
E = Elementary M = Middle School H = High School P = Professional Resource
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
(Appendix) http://www.howard.k12.md.us/met/media/handbook/appendix/periodicals.html
66
APPROVED LIST OF PERIODICALS (cont’d)
Key:
E = Elementary M = Middle School H = High School P = Professional Resource
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
(Appendix) http://www.howard.k12.md.us/met/media/handbook/appendix/periodicals.html
67
APPROVED LIST OF PERIODICALS (cont’d)
Key:
E = Elementary M = Middle School H = High School P = Professional Resource
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
(Appendix) http://www.howard.k12.md.us/met/media/handbook/appendix/periodicals.html
68
APPROVED LIST OF PERIODICALS (cont’d)
Key:
E = Elementary M = Middle School H = High School P = Professional Resource
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
(Appendix) http://www.howard.k12.md.us/met/media/handbook/appendix/periodicals.html
69
APPROVED LIST OF PERIODICALS (cont’d)
Key:
E = Elementary M = Middle School H = High School P = Professional Resource
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
(Appendix) http://www.howard.k12.md.us/met/media/handbook/appendix/periodicals.html
70
APPROVED LIST OF PERIODICALS (cont’d)
Key:
E = Elementary M = Middle School H = High School P = Professional Resource
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
(Appendix) http://www.howard.k12.md.us/met/media/handbook/appendix/periodicals.html
71
Review and Reevaluation of Materials in Use:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Selection of Instruction Materials Policy #8040
The following steps should be taken if a library item is challenged. For a full
statement of HCPSS Policy, see pages 44-45 in this handbook.
1.
The principal will make available specific material for review upon
community member request and make every effort to resolve the concern
at the school level.
2.
Following review of the material and a conference with the principal, the
community member may file a “Request for Reevaluation of Instructional
Materials In Use” form with the principal of the school. These forms will
be available at each school and at the Department of Education. A copy
of the completed form will be forwarded by the principal to the
Superintendent/designee.
3.
The Superintendent/designee, upon notification that a satisfactory
solution was not reached at the local school level, will refer the matter to
the Criteria/Review Committee (CRC).
4.
The CRC will reevaluate the work in consideration of the request and the
appropriate selection criteria and make a recommendation to the
Superintendent/designee in writing.
5.
The Superintendent/designee will decide whether to remove or retain the
material and notify the initiator of the reevaluation in writing.
6.
Further appeals are directed to the Superintendent of Schools.
7.
The Howard County Board of Education will serve as the final level of
appeal with the Howard County Public School System.
8.
Once Board approval has been given for reevaluated materials, no further
reevaluation will be made for at least two years.
72
73
Donations Policy:
Any items that are donated to the Ellicott Mills Media Center must meet the
selection criteria of the Howard County Public School System. Refer to the
Selection of Instructional Materials Policy #8040 (page 49 in this handbook)
for more information.
74
75
Weeding Policy & Procedure:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Once an adequate collection of materials has been established, it should be
maintained at peak quality and usefulness. This can be done by adding materials
as needed, by discarding those that are worn out, out-of-date, or no longer used,
and by mending books in need of repairs. Weeding is second only to selection in
keeping the collection current.
At least once a year the collection, both print and audiovisual, should be
examined to find worn-out materials, to remove those items which no longer
justify their space due to infrequent circulation, to consider replacement of poor
editions by better ones, and to round-out the collection. This may or may not be
done in connection with the shelf list inventory. Up to 5% of the collection
should be weeded each year. The library media specialist must keep a careful
accounting of the number of materials withdrawn. The talley of items
withdrawn must be kept from April 1st of one year to March 31st of the next.
In Library.Solution, there is a report that can be used to determine the number of
items that have been deleted from a school’s library media collection. To access
this report:
*
*
*
*
*
Open the Library.Solution Report file.
Select Items Deleted by Location.rpt.
Select your school’s name.
For the earliest date to consider, enter April 1, 20XX.
For the latest date to consider, enter today’s date (should
default to this).
The list that is generated will include the titles of the items that have been
deleted (by collection, i.e., everybody, fiction, etc.) and the dates on which they
were deleted.
The library media specialist is responsible for deciding what to discard.
Reference to standard lists and the advice of authorities in special fields should
be the basis for retaining or discarding doubtful titles.
Mend those items that can be repaired quickly with simple materials. Rebind
books only if they are out-of-print, or expensive and still in good condition.
Handle this directly through the company and pay through the library media
supply account.
76
Weeding Policy & Procedure (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Discard those items that fall into the following categories:
* Books with pages missing or badly torn
* Books with minute print, poor illustrations, and/or unattractive bindings
when better editions are available
* Materials which have not circulated for a considerable time
* Numerous duplicates of seldom-used titles
* Series books of mediocre quality
* Items with inappropriate reading or interest level
* Materials which are out-of-date or inaccurate
* Fictionalized representations of life that have contributed to false and
stereotyped concepts.
Criteria to consider when weeding include:
1) Copyright
Below are some suggested guidelines.
Dewey Classifications
000 2-10 years
100 10 years
200 2-10 years
300 5-10 years
400 10 years
500
600
700
800
900
5-10 years
5-10 years
5-15 years
flexible
15 years
Biographies - Flexible
* Fiction - 10 years
* Encyclopedias - 5-7 years
* Reference - evaluation on individual basis
* Periodicals - 5 years
* Almanacs/Yearbooks - 3 years in reference, 3 additional years in
circulation
2) Content – should be relevant to the needs and curriculum of the school
3) Physical condition – if in poor condition, repair or replace; does repair
make sense?
4) Number of circulations – This information can be found in Library.Solution
Reports (Titles & Items -> Items in a Selected Holdings code…..). If an
item hasn’t circulated for several years, consider weeding.
77
5) Superseded – Is there newer information available?
Weeding Policy & Procedure (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Consider keeping:
*
*
*
*
*
Classics, award winners; replace when condition deteriorates
Local history
Yearbooks and school publications
Titles on current reading lists
Out-of-print titles that are still useful
The American Library Association in cooperation with the Texas State Library
(1976), coined the term MUSTY as a guide for weeding.
78
Weeding Policy & Procedure (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Withdrawals:
After deciding which items to withdraw, remove the items through the Public
Access Catalog (PAC) following instructions from The Library Corporation.
Remove the shelf list card for every withdrawn item. Hold the shelf list cards in
a separate location until the number of withdrawn items has been noted for the
Annual Howard County School Library Media Center Report.
It is important that media books be boxed separately from textbooks and simply
labeled "media books." Separate paperback and hardback books to facilitate
recycling. Box withdrawn materials and seal the cartons. Complete a
Warehouse Pick-Up Delivery Request form (see appendix). Label each carton or
item being transferred with the appropriate destination name (Warehouse).
Attach a note generally listing the subject/content and condition of the boxed
books (boxing books by condition would be extremely helpful). Have the
principal sign the form. Detach the cost center copy (goldenrod) for the
school records. Send the remaining copies of the Warehouse Pick-Up Delivery
Request form to the Manager of Media Technical Services. The manager will
sign the Warehouse Pick-Up Delivery Request form and forward it to the
warehouse.
Withdrawn audiovisual items (e.g., filmstrips, videos, cassette tapes, etc.) that no
longer have any value for resale should be disposed of at the school. For any
questionable items, contact the HCPSS chief purchasing officer at the Central
Office (410.313.6722).
79
Record Keeping:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Library media specialists must keep accurate records of library media center
collections and programs. Records must be kept of additions and withdrawals.
A shelf list or database of all materials and AV instructional equipment must be
maintained. Accurate reporting is necessary for annual state reports and county
inventories.
Additions and Withdrawals:
Library media specialists must keep a cumulative summary of additions and
withdrawals for all collections. Run a “Count of Items by Material Type” for
your specified branch at the beginning of the school year. This will provide base
numbers for each area of the collection and allow you to plan for collection
development and weeding.
Shelf List:
Shelf list cards are to be used for both print and audiovisual materials. An
accurate up-to-date record for each item is required, including complete
information about all copies of a particular edition, and any special notes.
Audiovisual materials should not be given accession numbers. Kits are to be
counted as one item and should not be taken apart.
80
Inventory:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Inventory of all materials should be taken each year. This may be done at the
end of the school year or may be conducted throughout the year. Library media
specialists may establish a running inventory, checking certain groups of
materials each month and report a cumulative result in June. Regardless of the
method used, the library media specialist must keep accurate, up-to-date records
of acquisitions and withdrawals. The records are then used in completing the
Annual State Library Media Center report and the Annual Howard County
School Library Media Center Report.
Electronic Inventory:
The inventory process in Library.Solution is designed to allow you to do a
continuous inventory of your collection. Follow the directions distributed by The
Library Corporation to conduct an electronic inventory.
Shelf List Inventory:
1) Arrange all materials in shelf list order to expedite the inventory.
2) Remove the rod from the shelf list tray corresponding to the first section to
be inventoried.
3) Compare cards and materials checking for two discrepancies:
* Cards for which there are no materials
- Turn up or clip the card that represents an item that cannot be located.
When one section has been inventoried, search for missing items by
checking circulation or the repair shelf. Mark shelf list cards for missing
items that fail to turn up with an “M” and the date. Items missing for
two consecutive inventories should be withdrawn from the collection
via the Holdings Editor in Library.Solution. Remove the corresponding
shelf card, and keep a record of the number of items withdrawn using
the additions and withdrawals procedure. Prepare orders for items to
be replaced.
* Materials for which there are no shelf list cards
- If the item is in the circulation database and the PAC, send an
eProcessing Request form. (MARC records can be located in the PAC
system.) Click on the MARC icon, located on the record for the item.
81
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Inventory:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Inventory:
Library media personnel and technology teachers are responsible for maintaining
a current inventory of the equipment in the school. Inventories are needed in
order to track the location of school equipment, to maintain an adequate supply
of repair parts, and to make purchasing decisions. Inventories must be taken
annually. It is recommended that a running inventory that includes additions
and withdrawals since the last full inventory be maintained throughout the year.
Library media personnel should have a record of where all equipment is located
at all times.
Your school’s inventory should include the following:
* Equipment purchased with school system accounts (e.g., school “little
budget” funds, Special Education, etc.) and local school funds (e.g., book fair
profits, PTA funds, etc.).
* Equipment in portables.
* Equipment donated to your school that is instructionally valid, has been
approved by Networks and Technology Support Services personnel, and is in
current use by students, teachers or staff.
* Equipment that was purchased through grant funds that is the property of
HCPSS.
* Equipment that was purchased through other funding sources and is the
property of HCPSS.
Do not include:
* Equipment that is personally owned by a teacher, student or staff member.
* Equipment that is on loan from an organization (through grants, partnerships,
etc.).
A recent review of Policy 4040 has determined that it will no longer be necessary
to use HPCSS Fixed Asset Tags (FAT) for school system computers except for
equipment (servers, specialized computers) that costs in excess of $5,000. Instead,
AV Inventory Tags will be utilized for computers. It will no longer be necessary
to complete a separate Fixed Asset inventory, nor must the FATs be returned to
the Finance Office representative.
82
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Inventory
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
AV Inventory Tag Procedures:
All instructional audiovisual equipment that will be considered in school system
replacement cycles should be included in a school’s Central Inventory Database
(CID) and should have an AV Inventory Tag (AVIT) assigned. The chart below
distinguishes which equipment should have an AV Inventory Tag as well as
some examples of equipment that should not get a tag. Each school has a supply
of these tags to affix to new equipment when it arrives. Please note: The AV
Inventory Tags are to be applied ONLY to the equipment that is listed in the AV
Inventory Tag column. For the convenience of having all of the school’s
instructional AV equipment in a single location (the Central Inventory Database),
you may include even the equipment that doesn’t have a tag, but the tags should
be only on the predetermined equipment.
Prior to January 2008, most computers and some LCD projectors and printers
received Fixed Asset Tags. These should remain on the equipment until the items
are eventually decommissioned.
83
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Inventory
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
AV Inventory Tag Procedures:
TAG Chart:
84
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Inventory
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Procedures for Obtaining AV Inventory Tags for New Equipment:
In the initial rollout of the AV Inventory Tags, several hundred were distributed
to the library media center at each school. When more AV Inventory Tags are
needed, contact the secretary for the Office of Media and Educational Technology.
The tags will be sent to the school via the Pony.
Steps for Receiving New Audiovisual Equipment and Computers
* Mark all newly acquired audiovisual equipment upon receipt and acceptance
to identify the equipment as HCPSS property. Affix an AV Inventory Tag to
all equipment as indicated in the chart above. In the case of leased equipment
such as computers and LCD projectors, a label that can be easily removed
may be used, but no etching or permanent marking should be done.
* Add all newly acquired audiovisual equipment to the school’s Central
Inventory Database (CID) except for instances when the task is assumed by
Central Office personnel as part of an initiative (e.g., Replacement Plan1.0).
* Distribute the new AV item(s) to the appropriate person or location.
Computer Transfer:
Occasionally, it may be determined that some computers will be transferred from
one school to another (e.g., from BCMS to a general purpose lab in another
school). Create a list of computers being transferred to another school; include the
Fixed Asset Tag/AV Inventory Tag number for each. The Networks and
Technology Support Services technician should sign-off on the list of computers
being transferred. Indicate in the Central Inventory Database (CID) the new
location for these computers; if the new location has not been determined,
“assign” the computers to TSC.
Central Inventory Database (CID):
The purpose of the Central Inventory Database (CID) is to have a central
inventory of instructional equipment that provides a uniform system that all
schools and central staff can read. The online Central Inventory Database (CID)
will be used to make important decisions about possible upgrades and
replacement equipment. In order for the inventory to be useful, it is important
that like equipment is called by the same name (e.g., a television must be called a
television, not a TV or monitor/receiver – and spelling counts!). Please use only
the names that are found in the AV Equipment list.
85
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Inventory
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Central Inventory Database (CID):
To access the CID, library media specialists or other authorized individuals will
go to
http://media.howard.k12.md.us/newcode/lmsinventory/lmsinventory.php
Each user is associated with their respective school(s). Users who are in two
schools have unique logins for each school. If an individual needs CID access but
does not currently have it, please contact the library media instructional
facilitator.
Central Inventory Database information and resources are available on the
HCPSS Document Repository.
http://doc.hcpss.org.:8080/docushare/dsweb/View/Collection-11392
CID Procedures for Departmental Equipment:
Listed below are the procedural requests from various departments as to how
they would like their technology equipment to be handled for inventory
purposes. [Owner = Central Inventory Database field that indicates the
appropriate owner of the inventoried equipment]
* Special Education – All Special Education equipment should be inventoried
and entered into the CID with the owner indicated as “Spec. Ed.”
* Guidance – All Guidance equipment should be inventoried and entered into
the CID with the owner indicated as “Guidance.”
* School Psychologists – School Psychologist’s equipment should not be
inventoried by the school.
* Pupil Personnel Workers (PPW) – PPW’s equipment should not be
inventoried by the school.
* BSAP – BSAP equipment should be inventoried by the school.
* Health
- Health Assistants' equipment should be inventoried and entered into the
CID with the owner indicated as “Health."
86
- Health Cluster Nurses equipment should not be inventoried by the
school.
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Inventory
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
CID Procedures for Departmental Equipment (cont’d):
* Physical Education - Physical Education equipment should be inventoried
and entered into the CID with the owner indicated as “PE”
* Health Education – Health Education equipment should not be inventoried
by the school
* Title I – Title I equipment should be inventoried and entered into the CID
with the owner indicated as “Title I”. Please note that federal law stipulates
that Title I equipment may be used only with Title I students (this is
explicitly with an individual student or group of students, each of whom has
been identified as eligible for Title I, not using the equipment with a class of
students in which there are a few Title I students).
Making Corrections to the CID:
Please use the chart below to determine what to do with incorrect CID entries.
87
Budget Guidelines:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Each year during the budget process, funds are allocated for Library Media
Materials on a “per pupil” basis. Each school’s allocation for this account
(3220100) becomes available at the beginning of the fiscal year (July). The
balance of this account can be found in IFAS reports.
The Library Media Materials funds are intended to be used for books and other
materials for use by students during the school year in which the funds are
allocated. Library media specialists are encouraged to spend the funds as early
as possible in the school year.
88
Integrated Financial & Administrative
Solution (IFAS):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
The program used to enter purchase requisitions from the library media
accounts is Integrated Financial and Administrative Solution (IFAS). As stated
in the "IFAS Quick Reference Guide" (August 2005): "The Purchasing Module
allows individual schools/departments to request materials, equipment,
supplies, and services from external vendors. The WorkFlow process will ensure
the Purchase Requisitions are routed to the appropriate parties for approval.
Receiving is the process of recording the receipt of materials, equipment,
supplies, and services against Purchase Orders. Products MUST be received in
IFAS in order for Accounts Payable to pay the vendor.
Note: Encumbering of funds occurs at the Requisition level. Thus, once your
Requisition has been saved, the funds for all of the items in your
Requisition will become encumbered."
The IFAS account number for Media Services has two parts. The Key number is
10XX041501 in which the 3rd and 4th digits are your school's IFAS code
numbers.
The Object codes for library media are:
* Library/Media (books, audiovisual materials)
* Supplies (posters, key disks, pencils, etc.)
* Computer software and supplies
3220100
3292200
3292900
The Product Code for print and nonprint materials is 71500000. For all other
items, look up the product code in the IFAS system.
A quick reference for vendor numbers used frequently by library media
specialists can be found in the Vendor Numbers Frequently Used folder in the
Media-Services conference as well as in the Media Tech-Specific Documents
folder in the IFAS Users conference. Vendor numbers can also be obtained
within the IFAS program.
For additional information on IFAS, please refer to the documents found in the
IFAS Users conference or call the IFAS helpline (410.313.1588).
89
Ordering Process & Procedures:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Selection of materials for school library media collections is one of our greatest
responsibilities. This responsibility is delegated to the professionally trained
library media specialist in accordance with HCPSS School Board adopted
policies and guidelines (Policy #8040).
After determining collection needs, select and acquire the materials. Identify
high-quality materials that meet Howard County Public School System
guidelines.
Materials should be selected:
* from favorable reviews in approved sources (see appendix);
* from the Public Access Catalog (PAC) for HCPSS;
* from favorable evaluations by three faculty members using the "Selection
Criteria for Media Center Materials" form (see appendix);
* from HCPSS curriculum guides and resource guides;
* from bibliographies in HCPSS approved textbooks.
All materials must be selected for the appropriate grade level.
Reviews for many titles can be found in Patron Books in Print
(http://www.patronbooksinprint.com/bowker/default.asp); after you select
your search type and enter your keyword or ISBN, you will be prompted for a
login:
Username: hcpss06
Password: hcpss06
Another option is to complete the “Selection Criteria for Media Center
Materials” form after reading the book or viewing the audiovisual item (3
signatures from professional staff are required); submit the item and completed
form together to Judith Jurgenson to have the title added to the database.
90
Ordering Process & Procedures (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Various methods may be used for compiling titles for orders. These include
using
the vendor catalog order forms or vendor websites and/or developing a database
of items. When using any of these methods, use the Integrated Financial and
Administrative Solution (IFAS) to create a purchase requisition. Detailed
directions for using IFAS, including blank and sample worksheets, can be found
in the IFAS Users conference in CLC (CLC > Technology Systems > IFAS Users >
Purchase Order Documentation)-- locate the Media Tech-Specific Documents
folder inside the Purchase Order Documentation folder). NOTE: Finance Office
policy requires that IFAS users attend a training session before a user name and
password is given. Library media orders are different from general school orders,
so it is essential that library media personnel have the appropriate training for
library media IFAS accounts.
Pre-approved lists of materials may also be used. When ordering from preapproved lists that come from Media Technical Services, the Coordinator of
Media and Educational Technology (e.g., "Best of the Year" list), or other sources
within HCPSS, follow the instructions that accompany the lists.
When submitting titles for purchase, the approval source for each item should be
indicated on the purchase requisition or list (e.g., Booklist 3/05; PAC; HCPSS soc
stud gr 5). For items not previously approved, a copy of the "Selection Criteria
for Media Center Materials" form should be sent to Media Technical Services for
recording in the database; the original copy of the form should be kept in a file at
the school.
To prepare a list of materials for purchase, follow these instructions:
* Determine that items being ordered meet selection requirements.
* Indicate the quantity to be ordered.
* Include at least three of the following: title, author, ISBN, or publisher.
* Organize items in priority order.
* For all orders, submit two copies of the order to Media Technical Services.
* An additional copy of the order list should be prepared and used as a
receiving copy by the school. This copy may have additional information
such as subject area, the name of the individual who requested the item,
awards, reading level, etc. Copies of order lists should be maintained at
the school for three years (for potential audit purposes).
* When ordering a series or set of books, please send Media Technical Services
(MTS) a copy of the catalog page or a list of titles in the series so that MTS
personnel can determine that all items in a set/series have been delivered.
91
Ordering Process & Procedures (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
For book orders, a minimum of eighty percent must be ordered from the
following companies: Baker & Taylor; Perma-Bound; Scholastic Library
Publishing; Grolier. However, some publications are not available from these
vendors and should be ordered from the publishers or specialized vendors
Vendors That Provide Our Accepted Processing:
HCPSS has established relationships with certain vendors who have been able to
accommodate the book processing needs of the school system. Placing orders for
these companies follows a slightly different process. Because the books are preprocessed, they are shipped directly to the school.
Baker & Taylor, Inc (vendor #V01951-P2)
Perma-Bound (Vendor #V01229) - Catalog prices reflect the 22% discount given
to HCPSS.
Scholastic Library Publishing (vendor #V02269-P3) and Grolier Publishing
(vendor #V02269-P3) - Scholastic handles Children's Press, Franklin Watts,
Scholastic trade titles, and Grolier. The prices listed in bold print in the
vendor catalogs reflect the 30% discount on Children's Press and Franklin
Watts titles and the 40% discount on Scholastic trade titles.
When completing orders for these companies, follow these directions:
* Orders are to be shipped to the individual school (use the school's IFAS #).
- Attn: Library Media Center
* In the IFAS Print After field, enter:
- "Please send vendor copy of PO to Judy Litz, MTS, for mailing."
- "Free shipping/handling"
- "Full processing for all titles FREE of charge"
* Send two copies of the list of titles with the RQ# and the school name to Judy
Litz at Media Technical Services: keep a copy of the list at the school for
checking in the order and for audit purposes (must be retained for three
years).
* When the books arrive, do not open the boxes until Judith Jurgenson gives
notification that the titles have been merged with the database.
* After hearing from Judith, open the boxes and check the items against the
order list and packing slip.
* If there are any discrepancies in the order/shipment, contact Judy Litz at
Media Technical Services via CLC or phone (410.313.7036).
92
Ordering Process & Procedures (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
"Do Not Exceed" Orders:
"Do Not Exceed" orders are ones for which the vendor is to provide as many
items from a list as possible with the indicated amount of money. The total
should include shipping/handling.
* In the IFAS PR Notes field enter: "List of titles available at school"
* In the IFAS Print After field enter: "Please send vendor copy of PO to Judy
Litz, MTS, for mailing.”
Other Orders:
When ordering from vendors other than those listed above, follow these
directions:
* For orders from other vendors, orders are to be shipped to Media Technical
Services (IFAS # L13J).
* Leave the End Use field blank [this will automatically generate shipping to
Media Technical Services].
* Enter any shipping/handling costs as a line item.
* Enter any discounts as a line item.
* In the IFAS Print After field, enter any text that is to appear on the Purchase
Order (e.g., if a vendor/sales rep indicated shipping would be free, enter
that name; note if coupons are attached; etc.)
Additional Titles to Fill Orders:
If a vendor is unable to supply all of the titles ordered, or if the titles ordered cost
less than the amount of the funds encumbered with the purchase requisition, the
library media specialist will be contacted by Media Technical Services personnel
with a request for additional titles to complete the order. The funds for these
additional titles are already encumbered so nothing needs to be done with IFAS.
Submit a list of additional titles to Judy Litz at Media Technical Services; include
the school name and the Purchase Order number.
93
Ordering Process & Procedures (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Series Titles:
Titles in a series, even if previous titles are already approved, must have a
positive review or they must be read and have a “Selection Criteria for Media
Center Materials” form completed (indicating that the title is
appropriate/approved). There have been series for which the first several titles
were appropriate, but a later title had serious flaws/problems.
Standing Orders:
Standing orders (orders that are automatically generated by a vendor, such as
new titles in a series) are not permitted. Because funding from year-to-year
cannot be guaranteed, library media personnel may not enter into agreements for
standing orders.
Paperback Books:
Paperback books are frequently not cost effective purchases when one considers
the limited shelf life and the cost of processing them. Consider instead
purchasing the titles in prebound format. There are several companies that can
provide prebound books.
Periodicals:
Periodicals to be used by students must meet the same criteria as books (see
above). A combined order is compiled from all school requests, and all
subscriptions are placed with one jobber for one calendar year. This procedure
simplifies routines and results in substantial savings. Therefore, schools are
expected to place their subscription orders in the prescribed manner. Detailed
directions for ordering periodicals are sent to each school in the spring along with
the approved periodical list. Professional periodicals, used only by staff, are
automatically approved. Periodicals to be used with students that do not appear
on the approved list may be purchased by completing the Selection Criteria for
Media Center Materials form. The completed form should be forwarded to
Media Technical Services with the periodical order.
Each school is informed of the cost of its periodicals in the fall of the following
school year. The amount is deducted from the library media center materials
account at that time.
All correspondence pertaining to missing issues, poor service, etc., should be
directed to the jobber, not to Media Technical Services.
94
Ordering Process & Procedures (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Newspapers:
Newspapers to be used in the school library media center should be carefully
chosen publications for general circulation. Examples include:
* Local newspapers – Columbia Flier, Howard County Times
* Large city newspapers – The New York Times (Sunday edition), The Baltimore
Sun, The Washington Post
* National newspapers – Christian Science Monitor, USA Today, Wall Street
Journal
* Special interest newspapers when they deal with school curriculum and are
appropriate for the age, interests, and maturity level of the students –
Baltimore's Child
Payment for newspapers may be handled through the library media supply
account or other appropriate accounts.
U. S. Government Publications:
Government documents are available for purchase from the U. S. Government
Printing Office (http://bookstore.gpo.gov). Materials may be ordered through
IFAS. Payment must accompany the order. In IFAS, enter "Check enclosed" in
the Print After field.
Vertical File Materials:
Pamphlets, documents and magazine articles are primary types of materials
found in vertical files. They often provide library media center users brief
information on timely topics. Any materials needed to build an adequate file
may be ordered at the discretion of the library media specialist and should be
judged by the same criteria as other materials placed in the library media
collection. The materials may be purchased either through the library materials
account (3220100) or through the supply account (3292200). Vertical file materials
will not be processed by Media Technical Services and will not be included in
collection number totals.
95
Ordering Audiovisual Materials &
Instructional Software:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Audiovisual Materials:
Audiovisual materials (AV) must meet the same selection criteria as books.
Materials should be selected:
1. from favorable reviews in approved sources (see appendix);
2. from the Public Access Catalog (PAC) for HCPSS, age-appropriate level;
3. from favorable evaluations by three faculty members using the “Selection
Criteria for Media Center Materials” form (see appendix);
4. from HCPSS curriculum guides and resource guides;
5. from bibliographies in HCPSS approved textbooks.
Audiovisual materials may be purchased from the library media center materials
account (3220100). Follow the directions found in Other Orders above to complete
IFAS orders for AV materials.
When ordering a series of AV materials, please send Media Technical Services
(MTS) a copy of the catalog page or a list of titles in the series so that MTS
personnel can determine that all items in a set/series have been delivered.
In Policy #8040, section II.2.b.iii states that “R” and “NC-17” rated videos, and
non-rated feature videos produced after 1990 may not be shown to classes in
Howard County Public Schools. Even though section II.2.B.iv of the policy
permits the showing of “brief, appropriate excerpts from videos excluded by this
policy to address an important instructional purpose,” only videos that may be
shown in their entirety should be added to the school library media collection.
Instructional Software:
All software to be used with students in the Howard County Public School
System must meet COMAR regulations. Before ordering any software, check the
HCPSS listing of approved software (http://www.hcpss.org/purchasing) to
determine if the software has already been approved.
96
Ordering Audiovisual Materials &
Instructional Software (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Instructional Software (cont’d):
If the software is approved for the level of the intended users, it may be
purchased following the usual purchasing procedures. If the software is not
listed, complete and submit an "Instructional Software Request for
Approval Form." (see appendix) Other than software that has been purchased at
the county level (e.g., Microsoft Office, virus protection software, etc.), each
school is responsible for purchasing the appropriate licenses for any computer
programs being used in the school.
Software Approval Process (SAP):
Purpose: All software and web-based programs intended for use in the Howard
County Public School System must be approved prior to purchase. This is to
ensure that the software meets curriculum needs, is compatible with computer
systems in the schools, and has been reviewed for accessibility as required by
COMAR regulations (http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/508/508home.html).
Procedure: Initiation and submission of the software request
* Check the HCPSS listing of approved software to determine if the software has
already been approved or not approved. If the software is not listed, please
complete an Approval Request Form; the link for the form can be found on the
Software Approval page of the HCPSS Purchasing webpage:
http://www2.hcpss.org/purchasing/ApprovedSoftware/AprvdSoftwr.html.
* Provide as much detail about the software/program as possible.
* Forward the Approval Request Form to the Principal/Administrator of your
school/location for an authorizing signature.
* Save a copy of the completed Approval Request Form.
* Send the signed Approval Request Form to the Office of Media and Educational
Technology (OMET) at the ARL B-48. If you have a copy of the software, please
send it with the Approval Request Form.
The software will be reviewed by representatives from the offices of curriculum,
technology, and special education for approval. You will be notified of the status
at the completion of the approval process and results will be posted on the
website. All efforts will be made to complete the review process in less than six
weeks.
Call the SAP Test Lab Specialist with questions at x7178 or email Holly Windsor
at ([email protected]).
97
Ordering Audiovisual Materials &
Instructional Software (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Direct Payment Request:
“Effective July 1, 2008, the use of Direct Payment (DPs) shall be limited to
emergency orders and for those vendors not accepting VISA (HCPSS P-Card)
credit payments.” [HCPSS Purchasing Office] Purchases for the library media
collection from the library materials account (3220100) must be made using IFAS
(i.e., neither Direct Payment nor the HCPSS P-card may be used for this account).
To purchase books and audiovisual materials from the library media supplies
account (3292200), a library media specialist may use IFAS or an HCPSS card.
There is no guarantee that a library media specialist will be reimbursed via Direct
Payment for school purchases of books or AV materials made from their personal
funds.
Ordering Audiovisual Equipment and Computers:
Audiovisual equipment and computers may be ordered from the Replacement
Equipment Account or other school-based accounts. Consult with the building
principal about using these accounts. Select new equipment from the current AV
Equipment Catalog that is available online at http://www.hcpss.org/purchasing.
This website is routinely updated to reflect product and price changes.
NOTE: It is the policy of the Howard County Public School System to solicit competitive price
quotations for audiovisual equipment. Any requisition to purchase audiovisual equipment
other than that listed in the current AV Equipment Catalog is to be accompanied by a
written justification to support the purchase of such equipment. Letters of justification
must come from the school principal. Send letters of justification (it may be emailed) to the
Technology Service Center.
This approval process is required to review the serviceability of the equipment
requested. Requisitions to purchase audiovisual equipment not in the current AV
Equipment Catalog that are not accompanied by a written justification will be
returned to the originator for such justification.
When ordered equipment arrives, open the package to determine that the correct
contents have been shipped. Verify that the equipment operates properly. In
IFAS, complete the receive items process so that Accounts Payable can pay the
vendor.
IMPORTANT: It is imperative that accurate records be maintained to verify order placements and
receipt of equipment. If for any reason equipment does not arrive in the school within 90
days of the order date, contact the vendor.
98
Additional Ordering Information:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Library Media Supply Account (3292200):
There is an annual allocation for library media and audiovisual supplies (library
media lesson supplies, posters, lamps not provided by the Office of Technology,
computer printer supplies, etc.). Purchases from this account are to be made for
library media center materials by the library media specialist, with the approval of
the school principal. Orders may be placed using IFAS or with a Direct Payment
Request form.
Funds for this account will be allocated as equitably as possible at the beginning of
each fiscal year, usually on a “per pupil” basis. The actual amount in this account
may be found in IFAS reports. Any questions concerning this account should be
directed to the Accounting Officer.
Library and media supplies should be ordered, if possible, from the company
awarded the Baltimore Regional Council of Governments bid contract, which
provides substantial discounts or from the current HCPSS recommended
vendor(s). If specific items are not available from those sources, they may be
ordered from other supply companies.
It is possible to obtain a credit card that can be used with this account. Details on
how to do this are available from the school system Accounting Officer.
Other Accounts:
Other monies, such as the profit from book fairs, donations from the PTA, and
money from lost materials, should be maintained in a separate, school-based
checking account to be spent on library media center purchases. Individual
schools will have their own school activity account procedures for utilizing the
account. These details should be discussed with the principal's secretary or with
the school's bookkeeper. Library media personnel should keep a record of
expenditures against this account.
Furniture:
Check with the Coordinator of Media and Educational Technology if it is felt that
there is a need for new and/or replacement furniture. If it is determined that new
or replacement furniture is needed for the library media center, the library media
specialist should consult with the building principal who manages the funds for
furniture.
99
Receiving & Processing:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Print and Audiovisual Materials:
After materials have been selected, evaluated, and ordered for the library media
center collection, they must be processed in order to be added to the collection. The
policies and procedures for receiving and processing materials are noted below.
All materials ordered through the office of Media Technical Services will be
cataloged and processed by them before being sent to the schools. All will be
cataloged using the Dewey Decimal System and Sears List of Subject Headings.
The processing should not be altered in any way. Particularly do not change the
Dewey number or add numbers or letters. Questions regarding cataloging should
be referred to Media Technical Services.
Bar code numbers, cards, pockets, and book jacket covers will be provided for all
materials. Materials should be put into circulation as soon as possible. A sample
set of instructions for receiving materials can be found on the next page. Packing
slips accompany materials sent from Media Technical Services.
100
Receiving & Processing (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Steps to Follow when Receiving Materials:
1. Unpack and count the items in each carton. Check the count against the
packing slip. If books come directly from Baker & Taylor books, PermaBound books or Scholastic Library Publishing, do NOT open the boxes until
you hear from Media Technical Services via email that the titles have been
merged.
2. If there is a discrepancy, re-count the items; resolve the discrepancy or note the
problem on the packing slip.
3. Complete the "Received and Checked by" and "Date received" portions of each
packing slip.
4. Send one copy of each packing slip to Media Technical Services.
5. *Copy the bar code number in a second location on the item, where it can be
easily found.
6. Stamp each item, including guides, envelopes, worksheets, card pocket, and
box, with the library media center stamp.
7. If the item is computer software, file the back-up copy of the disk (if there is
one) in a back-up file.
8. *Record the new items on a record sheet of additions and withdrawals.
9. Tape bar code labels with heavy-duty book tape or label protectors.
10. Remove the shelf list card from the pocket.
11. File the shelf list cards.
12. Check to be sure that the circulation system reads every bar code.
13. If an item is not in the circulation system, follow the instructions found in
"Problems with Materials".
*Optional
101
Receiving & Processing (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Adding Items to Existing Titles:
It is important to understand the difference between titles and items. Each title in
the Public Access Catalog (PAC) is unique in that it has its own ISBN number.
Media Technical Services can only add titles. A title in the PAC may have
numerous items. An item is an individual entry under a title, i.e., each item with a
different barcode. For example, Call of the Wild is a title. The various copies of that
book with the same ISBN are the items.
Items can no longer be entered on-the-fly except for periodicals and audiovisual
equipment. When periodicals or AV equipment need to be added, contact Judith
Jurgenson in Media Technical Services (via CLC or 410-313-7036) who will assist
with the process.
Vertical File Materials:
Vertical files are usually kept in folders in file drawers and are organized by
subject, using Sears List of Subject Headings as an organizing guide. The height of
vertical files should be appropriate for the height of the students. Materials in the
file need not be inventoried, but should be weeded periodically as necessary. (See
the section on Vertical File Materials under “Ordering Procedures - Media
Technical Services” for further information.) Having a vertical file is optional.
Periodicals:
A record should be kept of periodicals as they arrive. The library media specialist
may create this record or periodical record forms can be ordered from a library
supply company. This record can be used to indicate the regularity of
subscriptions. The school name should be stamped on each magazine, and the
latest editions may be paced in display binders. If periodicals are to be circulated,
they may be entered on-the-fly into the circulation database. (See instructions
above.) Single item barcodes for on-the-fly circulation should be purchased from
The Library Corporation.
102
Receiving & Processing (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Unprocessed Materials – eProcessing:
Library media materials that need to be processed may be added to a school’s
collection via eProcessing. eProcessing is an electronic method for requesting
processing of materials. The cataloger deals with eProcessing request promptly,
and this method does not require that materials be sent to Media Technical
Services. To determine if an item qualifies for eProcessing, follow these steps.
1. On the Item/Title Info tab in the Circulation module of Library.Solution, enter ISBN
of the item to be added.
2. If the matching title and ISBN appear in the Title Information section of the record,
eProcessing (see below) may be requested.
3. If a matching title and ISBN are not found, send the item to Media Technical Services
for processing (see “Unprocessed Materials – Sending Material to Media Technical
Services”). Include a Media Technical Services Processing Request form and any
other necessary documentation (e.g. Selection Criteria for Media Materials form;
Direct Payment Requisition form).
To use the eProcessing Request form, follow these steps:
*
*
*
*
Log into the Collaborative Learning Community (CLC).
Open the Media-Services conference.
Select MTS eProcessing Request.
Complete the form; when finished, close the form. NOTE: When requesting
processing for multiple copies of a title with the same ISBN, up to three (3)
barcodes may be entered on a single eProcessing Request form.
* The form is automatically forwarded to Judith Jurgenson at Media Technical Services
who will expedite the processing of the request.
Unprocessed Materials – Sending Materials to Media Technical Services:
Processing may also be obtained by sending the items to Media Technical Services.
Stamp the material with the library media center name and place them in an
appropriate package or box. Complete a Media Technical Services Processing
Request form (see appendix). Only one processing request form is needed for all
like requests. For example, several books that need the same type of processing
require only one form. Enclose any necessary documents (e.g., Selection Criteria
for Media Materials form; Media Technical Services Processing Request form;
Direct Payment Requisition form). If sending half a dozen or fewer items, they
may be sent in the blue Pony film bag. For larger quantities of materials, complete
a Warehouse Pick-Up/Delivery Request form (see appendix) and send it to the
warehouse.
103
Receiving & Processing (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Processing Requests:
When submitting items for requested processing, only one Media Technical
Services Processing Request form is needed for all like requests. For example,
several books that need the same type of processing require only one form.
Problems with Materials:
Occasionally problems are discovered upon receipt or during the use of materials.
If this happens, follow these steps:
1. If an item arrives from Media Technical Services without a barcode, check the
circulation module of the Library.Solution for the item. If the exact match is
found for the author, title and ISBN complete an eProcessing Request form.
2. If an item that has been cataloged arrives without a shelf list card, check the
item’s packaging. If the shelf list card still cannot be found, complete an
eProcessing Request form.
3. If a barcode is lost, damaged, or removed from an item, complete an
eProcessing Request form. Include the problem barcode number that needs
to be removed from the database. If you have replaced the barcode, please
provide the new number. If Media Technical Services is to provide a new
barcode, please check the appropriate box on the form.
4. If there are items that are determined to be inappropriate for the collection
(example - subject matter, vocabulary, too high for the level of users, etc.),
remove them as follows:
a. Pull the shelf list card.
b. Withdraw the item from the library media collection via the Holdings
Editor in Library.Solution.
c. Send the item, the shelf list card, and a completed Media Technical
Services Processing Request form to Media Technical Services
5. If there are items that need classification changes (example - Main to
Reference, Fiction to Everybody, etc.):
a. Complete an eProcessing Request form with a note as to the requested
changes.
104
Receiving & Processing (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
SAMPLE PROCESSING REQUEST FORM:
Media Technical Services Processing Request
School Name.............................................................
Date...........................................................................
Complete this section or attach MARC record:
ISBN..........................................................................
Control #(001 field MARC record)...........................
Title...........................................................................
Author.......................................................................
Bar code number.......................................................
Call number...............................................................
Price...........................................................................
Check the appropriate box(es):
........Provide bar code label.
........Print shelf list card.
........Print labels.
........Add item to the database.
........ Inappropriate for grade level
Please reassign.
Reevaluate call number(s)
........... Two or more copies have different call numbers.
........... Call number may be inappropriate.
Other (Describe) ......................................................
..................................................................................
105
106
107
108
Utilization of Library Media
Materials & Services:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
The library media center is a learning center within the school where a full
range of materials, equipment, and services are available to both students and
staff. Every effort should be made to ensure accessibility and full use of the
facilities and services of the library media center, and provisions should be
made for groups of all sizes.
Just as the library media center facility should be available and accessible, so
should the time and professional knowledge of the library media specialist.
Since there will always be a steady flow of students to and from the library
media center, the most flexible of schedules possible should be maintained.
The library media specialist will work with individuals and small groups
when they are in the center for purposeful activities. Time spent with large
groups should be a result of mutual planning between teachers and the library
media specialist. Consideration should be given to the library media specialist
who is teaching. As stated in the Master Agreement Between the Board of
Education of Howard County and the Howard County Education Association,
Article XIX, “Working Hours and Work Load,” “Media specialists who are
teaching a class shall not be required to provide normal media services during
said teaching time.”
Instructional skills necessary to use the library media center’s materials and
equipment should be a part of each student’s educational program. This body
of knowledge regarding the use of media and library materials is essential to
student progress in all areas of instruction. The library media curriculum is
therefore the joint instructional responsibility of the library media specialist
and teachers.
There are five general categories of objectives which comprise the library
media skills curriculum: locating, retrieving, and handling materials; selecting
and evaluating information; organizing, managing, and comprehending
information; using information effectively and creatively; and appreciating
media. Essential curriculum documents contain complete listings of specific
library, media, and technology skills.
109
Utilization of Library Media
Materials & Services (cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Media Production:
The production of original media in the school has two primary purposes: the
production of support materials that are unavailable commercially; and the
production of media as a learning activity for students.
The production of support materials may range from simple transparency
production to the production of elaborate videotapes or computer-generated
materials. The key to deciding whether or not to produce original support
materials should be the commercial availability of appropriate media, since it
is almost always cheaper and less time-consuming to purchase commercial
media than to produce them.
Media production activities are a valuable part of each student’s instructional
program. The activities encourage competence in communicating in a variety
of formats. Objectives for student media production skills are listed in the
Media Essential Curriculum.
Book Fairs:
Book fairs are an optional activity that may be planned by the library media
specialist alone or jointly with the PTA and may be a source of income to be
used in acquiring materials or instructional equipment for the library media
center. Materials and equipment purchased with these funds must be selected
according to normal acquisition procedures. Profits may be added to the
Library Media Center Materials Account or to other school-based library
media accounts. To add money to this account, send a check payable to
Howard County Public Schools to the Manager of Media Technical Services.
This money sent for deposit to the account must be spent by the deadline
established by the HCPSS Director of Finances.
All books sold at book fairs held during the school day must be approved
titles, selected according to the evaluation and selection procedures
established by the Board of Education (see Selection of Instructional Materials
Policy #8040).
Book fairs must conform to the policy, procedures, and regulations that
govern school fund raising (HCPSS Administrative Policy on Fund Raising
#4020 in the policy manual).
110
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
The library media specialist, library media paraeducator/secretary, and
technology teachers, are the building coordinators for audiovisual equipment and
computers, and, therefore, have the responsibility for equipment maintenance,
repair, and circulation. These individuals must inventory or supervise the
inventory of all audiovisual equipment, including sound systems, language labs,
auditorium systems, computers, networks, and closed-circuit television systems.
NOTE: Scoreboards, Office PAs, and alarms are not the responsibility of the library media
personnel or technology teachers since these items are repaired and maintained by Building
Services (410-313-7084). Networks and Technology Support Services (410-313-7004) coordinates all
matters relating to the repair of instructional audiovisual equipment.
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Circulation and Distribution:
Equipment distribution may vary from school to school, depending on individual
school needs. It may be convenient to sign out frequently used pieces of
equipment for long-term loans to teams or departments in the school. Less
frequently used pieces of equipment may be signed out to individual teachers or
students on a daily basis. Library media personnel and technology teachers are to
maintain accurate equipment circulation records at all times.
Equipment housed in departments, team areas, and classrooms during the school
year must be available for inventory, maintenance, and repair. Requests for
repairs are to be made only by the school’s library media personnel, technology
teachers and CTE Instructional Team Leaders (ITLs).
Additional Equipment and Computers:
When a new piece of equipment is purchased, it should immediately be entered
on the school’s Central Inventory Database. Donations should be referred
through the Technology Service Center (x7004). Each piece of equipment should
be labeled with the school name.
111
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Loans to Teachers:
Teachers are permitted to borrow some types of instructional equipment.
Teachers may not borrow instructional desktop or mobile lab computers for use
outside school. All equipment borrowed by teachers must be checked out and
returned through library media personnel.
Teachers who borrow any equipment from the school must complete the
Equipment Loan Form (see appendix) and file it with the library media personnel
prior to taking the equipment from the building. Teachers are responsible for the
equipment on loan to them until it is officially returned to the library media
personnel.
Storage:
Equipment is to be stored in a secure location when not in use.
Use of Personal Equipment on School Networks:
Educators may not connect personal computers and similar technology to school
networks.
112
113
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Audiovisual Equipment & Computers Maintenance and Repair:
Repairs may be required occasionally to restore worn or damaged equipment to
operating condition, provided the item is still in demand, or not obsolete, and the
estimated cost of repair is reasonable in relation to the replacement cost. To have
an item repaired, follow the procedures below:
1. Prepare a Computer/Audiovisual Equipment Repair Ticket. Complete all
items on the left side of the ticket.
2. Attach the repair ticket to the equipment. (The white copy of the repair ticket
will be dated and initialed by the AV Technician, then left with the library
media personnel until the equipment is repaired.)
3. Place the equipment in an area where maintenance can be performed.
* Equipment that is not tagged or placed in a common area for maintenance
will not be repaired.
* Equipment not on inventory will not be repaired.
* Nonapproved equipment will not be repaired.
4. All repair requests for AV and Computer repair should be addressed
through the school system’s Networks and Technology Support Services
website: http://service.hcpss.net. Each school has a unique login and
password.
NOTE: HCPSS has only 99 concurrent connections for the Service Database; please log out
promptly after entering service requests.
5. Emergency requests for lamps, computer repairs, and video repair can be
called in to the Networks and Technology Support Services at x7004.
NOTE: It is not always possible to send a repair person immediately to meet a request because
all of the technicians may already be attending to emergencies. An attempt will be
made to have equipment repaired as quickly as possible.
6. The library media personnel, technology teachers, front office staff, or CTE
ITL (responsible for entering all computer repair requests for BCMS,
Technology Education, and Family & Consumer Science) should place
requests for computer repairs. When making requests either on-line or via
the phone (in emergencies), please have the following information ready:
* Equipment type
* Model
* Serial number or Service Tag number (Dell computers)
* Description of the problem
114
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Annual Maintenance:
Planned maintenance will take place every summer when possible. Equipment
needing repair should be tagged in the usual manner before the end of the school
year and left in the usual maintenance location.
LCD Projector Maintenance:
Because of the replacement agreement for LCD projectors, do not write on or etch
Epson LCD projectors; easily removable labels may be used.
Remind staff members to periodically clean the projector filter (located below the
projector lens) simply by removing the piece and blowing off any dirt or dust.
Set the lamp brightness on low by clicking on the menu button, selecting settings,
selecting brightness control, and setting the control on low. The image will be
slightly dimmer, but it should not affect the students’ ability to view the image
clearly.
Library media personnel/technology teachers should not climb ladders due to
safety concerns. When the bulbs in ceiling mounted LCD projectors need to be
replaced or when the filter needs to be cleaned, the school custodian should climb
the ladder and bring the projector down for the library media
specialist/technology teacher. Questions about this can be directed to the
Manager of Custodial Services.
115
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
LCD Projector Repair/Replacement:
Epson LCD Projectors – purchased 2005 or later
NOTE: All Epson LCD Projectors purchased from Nicholas Pipino & Associates since August 1,
2005 have a three year exchange service warranty and a three year bulb replacement warranty.
If the lamp ceases to function within the first 3 years/3000 hours:
* Enter a service request into the TSC database (LCD projector will appear as a
separate item).
NOTE: The number of lamp hours can be found in the projector’s “Info” menu.
If the LCD projector is projecting in orange and green tones, check to see:
* If the VGA cable is loose, has a bent pin, or is broken inside. Check the
connection and/or switch out the cable, OR
* If someone may have changed the Color Settings. Check the menu (look for
something along the lines of "Color Settings" depending on your model) and
see if someone accidentally changed it to "YCbCr" instead of "RGB.
If the LCD projector is projecting in purple:
* Go into the menu. Find the computer input setting. Be sure that the input
setting is set to auto. If this does not correct the problem, submit a service
request into the TSC database.
For other non-functioning issues:
* Enter a service request into the TSC database (LCD projector will appear as a
separate item).
* The Technology Service Center Assistant Manager will transmit service
requests to the vendor.
* The vendor will visit school sites to evaluate the LCD projectors.
* The vendor will repair the LCD projectors onsite, if possible.
116
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
LCD Projector Repair/Replacement (cont’d):
If the LCD projector cannot be repaired onsite:
* LMS/TT should keep all cables and cases for LCD projectors.
* The LMS/TT should prepare and submit (to the Warehouse) a Warehouse
Pick-up/Delivery Request form.
* The LCD projector will be delivered to the HCPSS Technology Center.
* HCPSS Technology Center personnel will remove the Fixed Asset Tag (FAT)
or AV Inventory Tag and make a notation in the CID about the status of the
LCD projector.
* HCPSS Technology Center will send the projectors to the designated
repair/replacement facility.
When the replacement projector arrives:
* HCPSS Technology Center personnel will:
- Affix a new AV Inventory Tag and record it in the CID.
- Change the serial # in the CID.
- Add any other changes to the CID, as needed (model, etc.).
- The LCD projector will be taken to the school by an AV technician or via a
Warehouse Pickup/Delivery Request.
LCD Projectors Other Than Epson
Enter a service request into the TSC database (LCD projector will appear as a
separate item).
117
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Scrapped Equipment:
Items worn beyond reasonable repair, but which continue to demand use should
be replaced, providing funds are available. Generally, if equipment has outlived
at least one-half of its expected life, and if the cost of repair is at least one-half the
cost of a new piece of equipment, then it would be advisable to consider
replacement rather than repair of the equipment. Networks and Technology
Support Services AV technicians will assist in determining whether an item
should be repaired or replaced.
When it has been determined that a piece of audiovisual equipment cannot be
repaired, the technology specialist from the Technology Service Center will initial
the scrap approval section of the Computer/Audiovisual Equipment Order. The
marked form will be sent to the school.
118
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Funds for Replacement Equipment:
In addition to school-based funds (e.g., book fair profits), a limited amount of
funds for replacing audiovisual equipment is allocated to schools on a rotating
basis. Schools receiving funds will be notified by the Coordinator of Media and
Educational Technology each fall. Administrators, library media specialists, and
teachers should then work together to identify audiovisual equipment needs
based on HPCSS Audiovisual Equipment Standards (see Appendix) and should
create a list of equipment to purchase. Instructions for ordering will accompany
the notification. Additional information on ordering audiovisual equipment and
computers can be found in the “Ordering Procedures” section of this handbook.
Please note: Equipment not listed the Central Inventory Database (CID) does not
qualify for replacement.
Stolen Equipment:
Stolen equipment may be replaced provided there is evidence of forcible entry.
1. Notify the school administrator in charge of Buildings and Grounds.
2. Report the break-in to the police. All equipment serial numbers are to be
registered with the police at that time.
3. Procure a police file number from the investigating officer.
4. Complete a Report of Property Destruction, Theft, and Fire Damage (available
through the Safety, Environment, and Risk Management Office 410-3136824).
5. Send a copy of the Report of Property Destruction, Theft, and Fire Damage to
the Safety, Environment, and Risk Management Office. If the theft involves
repair of property, the school should notify Building Services for repairs to
building.
6. Contact the Safety, Environment, and Risk Management Office to determine if
replacement funds are available.
119
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Pilfered Equipment:
Pilfered equipment refers to equipment that is missing, but not as a result of a
break-in. When equipment is listed as missing at the end of the school year, it is
acceptable to wait until September to report the missing equipment to the police.
Often, equipment will turn up at the beginning of the new school year. The
purpose of replacing pilfered equipment is to replace those missing items which
may not turn up in September, not to replace 40 or 50 items at one time which
have been lost through poor management and/or lack of inventory control over a
period of more than one school year.
Upon knowledge that the equipment is missing and finding no reason to believe
that school staff or students have borrowed the equipment, the following is to be
done:
1. Report the missing equipment to the police. All equipment serial numbers
are to be registered with the police at the time.
2. Procure a police file number from the investigating officer.
3. Complete a Report of Property Destruction, Theft, and Fire Damage.
4. Send a copy of the Report of Property Destruction, Theft, and Fire Damage to
the Safety, Environment, and Risk Management Office.
5. Contact the Safety, Environment, and Risk Management Office to determine if
replacement funds are available.
Missing Instructional AV Equipment and Computers:
The procedure for replacing stolen or pilfered equipment is to be followed. All
missing equipment will be carried on the inventory for two (2) years. Missing
equipment will be noted in the “Remarks” column of the Central Inventory
Database.
Equipment Vandalized or Lost by Students:
Students will be responsible for equipment vandalized or lost while in their
possession. Lost equipment is considered pilfered equipment.
120
Audiovisual Equipment & Computer Procedures
(cont’d):
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Removal of AV Equipment and Computers:
When it has been determined that equipment can no longer be used by your
school, follow the procedures listed below to have the equipment removed from
the building.
Audiovisual Equipment:
* Create a list of the equipment that is to be removed. Include equipment type and the
AV Inventory Tag (AVIT) number (if one is attached). If there is no AVIT, include
the serial number.
* Obtain approval for the removal of the equipment from your principal.
* Place the equipment in a central location.
* Send a copy of the equipment list to both your electronic technician and your
computer technician.
* A confirmation e-mail will be sent to you telling which equipment will be picked up
by the appropriate technician and which equipment will be picked up by the
Warehouse.
* Complete a Warehouse Pick-Up/Delivery Request listing each piece of equipment
that is to be picked up by the Warehouse. Attach a copy of the e-mail to the request.
* The Warehouse will schedule pick-up.
* Indicate on your inventory which items have been removed from the building.
Computer Equipment:
* Complete a Warehouse Pick-Up/Delivery Request listing each piece of equipment
and the Fixed Asset Tag number (if one is attached.) See appendix for example of
form.
Example: Computer eMac #12345
* Obtain approval for the removal of the equipment from your principal.
* Place the equipment in a central location.
* Place a work order with your Networks and Technology Support Services technician
letting him/her know that you have a specified number of pieces of equipment to be
checked for pick-up.
* Keep the Warehouse Pick-up/Delivery Request available for the technician. He/she
will indicate which items on the list are ready to be sent to the Warehouse. The total
number of items to be sent will be written on the form and signed by the technician.
* All computer equipment being withdrawn must be tagged with an orange dot
sticker. This indicates that the computer has been approved for removal. Orange dot
stickers can be obtained from the Networks and Technology Support Services.
* Send the signed Warehouse Pick-up/Delivery Request to the Warehouse.
* The Warehouse will schedule pick-up.
121
* Indicate on your Central Inventory Database which items have been removed from
the building.
Teacher Request Procedure
Should a teacher request an item that the library does not own, the following
procedures should be followed:
1.
Teacher should obtain a copy of the “Materials Request” form from the
media specialist, complete it, and return it to the media specialist.
2.
The media specialist will review the item request using the Howard
County Selection of Instructional Materials Policy #8040 and the approved
list of bibliographic sources, etc.
3.
If the requested item meets the standards of the selection policy, has
been professionally reviewed, AND there are adequate funds available,
the media specialist will notify the teacher that his/her request has been
approved. The media specialist will purchase the item and alert the
teacher when it has arrived and been processed.
4.
If the requested item meets the standards of the selection policy, has
been professionally reviewed, but there are not adequate funds to
purchase it at the time of the request, the media specialist will notify the
teacher that the item will be purchased as soon as funds do become
available. The media specialist will follow-up with the teacher when the
item is actually ordered.
5.
If the requested item has not been professionally reviewed, the media
specialist will notify the teacher and remind him/her that the item may
be purchased upon favorable evaluation by three professionals, using
the established Selection Criteria for Media Center Materials form. The
media specialist will facilitate this process if the teacher desires to
pursue it.
122
Materials Request Form:
Teacher’s Name: ________________________________
Type of Material (circle one):
book
textbook
periodical
transparency
Date: __________
video
software
audio recording
other: ________________________________
Title of Material: ______________________________________________________
Author, Editor, Producer: ______________________________________________
Publisher: _______________________________ Copyright Date: ____________
Cost (if known): ____________
Where did you find this item? __________________________________________
Grade level(s) for which the material is proposed: _________________________
Subject: _______________________________
Unit of study to which this item pertains: ________________________________
Teacher’s Signature: __________________________________________________
For Media Use:
Item meets selection criteria?
_____ Yes
_____ No
If yes, where has it been reviewed? _____________________________________
Purchase Decision: ___________________________________________________
Date of Teacher Notification of Decision: ________________________________
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Circulation Procedures:
Loan Periods & Renewals:
Students: Students may check out up to four items at a time for a
duration of three weeks. A maximum of one audiovisual item may be
checked out at a time. Items may be renewed once unless a hold is
placed on an item.
Staff: Staff may check out materials in a similar manner, although the
number of items and check-out period may vary. Staff are encouraged
to return materials promptly upon finishing with them so other library
users may access them to fulfill information needs.
Overdue or Missing Items:
Overdue notices will be sent to students through Homeroom teachers.
Media staff and homeroom teachers alike are encouraged to uphold
students’ rights to confidentiality. At the end of the school year, if
overdue items have not been returned, media staff will mail a letter
home requesting that either the item(s) be returned or a check made out
to EMMS be sent to replace the missing library items. The prices listed
should be the same as the media specialist originally paid for the
missing items. Media staff should keep replacement/payment
information on file. If missing items are eventually found, money
should be returned to the person who paid for them.
Damaged Items:
Library materials that have been damaged beyond repair will be paid for
by the person responsible for the damage. Media staff will mail a letter
home informing the addressee of the damage and requesting a check
made out to EMMS be sent to replace the damaged library item(s). The
prices listed should be the same as the media specialist originally paid
for the damaged item. Media staff should keep replacement/payment
information on file.
Reference Materials:
Reference materials cannot be checked out of the media center. Library
patrons are encouraged to utilize the online databases to which EMMS
subscribes. Databases can be remotely accessed using password
information available in the library media center.
124
Circulation Procedures:
Magazines/Periodicals:
Current issues of magazines and periodicals cannot be checked out from
the media center. Patrons are welcome to read current issues in the
media center. Upon the arrival of new issues, old magazines and
periodicals will be added to the circulating collection.
All circulating magazines and periodicals must be placed inside a
laminated manila envelope upon checkout. This is to maintain
durability. Users will be encouraged to keep magazines and periodicals
in the laminated envelopes when they are not being used.
Audio/Visual Items:
EMMS has a wide collection of DVDs, VHS cassette tapes, CD-rom
software, and audiobooks. These items are available for checkout by
both students and staff. Students may check out only one A/V item at a
time; staff checkout is unlimited.
Equipment:
Staff are permitted to sign out the following equipment:
 LCD Projector (2 available)
 computer speakers
 CD/Cassette players & Recorders
 laptop mobile lab with printer & airport (2 available - 15 laptops each)
 TV cart with VCR or DVD player (1 of each available)
 digital still camera (1 available)
 digital video camera (2 available)
 tripod (1 available)
 microphone (1 available)
 headphones
 VCR channels (10 available for reservation)
Equipment must be signed out daily in the Media Center Scheduling
Binder. Equipment should be reserved two days prior to the date it is
needed.
125
Interlibrary Loan Procedure:
Interlibrary Loan (ILL) among the HCPSS school library media
specialists is permitted, with loans being made from the library media
specialist at the loaning school to the library media specialist at the
borrowing school. An ILL request might be denied if the owning
school’s staff or students are using or have immediate plans to use the
material in question. If an item borrowed through ILL is lost or
damaged, the borrowing school should replace the material.
When using email to request materials from other library media centers,
please do the following:
• Before sending out an email requesting materials, check the PAC to see
which schools own the item you are looking for. Send out only one
email at a time, to these schools, until you get the material you need.
This will save other library media specialists from checking for the
materials when you already have the item(s) that you need.
• When sending out the email request, use ILL in the subject. Include the
author, title, and call number of the item you are requesting in your
message. Always sign your request with your name and school.
• Library media specialists should be the one to contact other schools to
make an interlibrary loan request. Teachers should not be contacting
other schools, although they may go to the school to pick up the
materials, if necessary.
126
Scheduling of the Media Center &
Computer Lab:
Teachers will use the Media Center Scheduling Binder located on top of the
circulation desk to schedule time in the media center and computer lab.
This is also where staff will sign out mobile laptop labs and other
audiovisual equipment. Before visiting the media center or computer lab,
teachers should notify the media specialist of the purpose of their visit
(book selection, research, multimedia projects, etc.). Teachers are
encouraged to seek assistance from the media specialist on all projects-collaboration procedures and planning forms are located in the back of this
binder!
Below are some important media scheduling reminders:
• The media specialist’s schedule will always be posted on the whiteboard
near the circulation desk.
• Teachers are asked to use pencil in the scheduling binder.
• Please sign up for media center/computer lab time and for A/V
equipment at least two school days in advance.
• The pages in the scheduling binder are color-coded (blue for blue days
and white for white days).
• Use the front of each page to reserve Media Center time and the back of
each page to reserve the computer lab.
• Please do not sign up when other teachers have already reserved time.
• If you know you will not be able to make your scheduled media center or
computer lab time, please call the media center at ext. 238 as early as
possible so other teachers may take advantage of the newly-open time
slots.
• Use the bottom of the scheduling page to reserve VCR channels.
• Use the top portion of the scheduling page to sign out A/V equipment.
127
128
A/V Equipment Sign-Out:
Today’s Date: ___________
Media Center Scheduling
Today’s Date: ___________
129
Computer Lab Scheduling
Open Access, Library Hours, Student Passes, &
Behavior Expectations:
Open Access to Library Materials:
The Ellicott Mills Media Center welcomes all members of the school community
to take advantage of the diverse collection of print and electronic
resources we have available. Fulfilling the information needs of our
patrons in a timely and unbiased manner is a top priority here. We strive
to offer flexible and equitable access for all, and thus, we employ the
following policies to accommodate the needs of a wide range of library
users.
Hours of Operations:
The EMMS Media Center will open before school every morning at 7:45 am.
The Media Center will remain open after school until 3:45. During these
times, students may borrow materials, browse, do research, or complete
homework.
Classroom Passes:
During school hours, students may visit the media center if they have signed
library pass from their classroom teacher. The pass will include the date,
assignment/purpose for the visit, time the student leaves the classroom,
and the teacher’s signature. The Media Specialist may not be available for
assistance during unscheduled visits, particularly if teaching a lesson.
Teachers are encouraged to call the media center at ext. 238 if a student will need
assistance.
Lunch Policy:
Students may visit the Media Center during lunch if passes are available in the
cafeteria for that given day. Lunch passes will be limited to 20 students
on a given day.
Student Behavior Expectations for the Media Center & Computer Lab:
1)
Respect your peers, your teachers, your facility, and yourself!
2)
Act responsibly--remember the computer and Internet usage policy.
3)
Please do not bring food, drinks,or gum into the Media Center.
130
Adult Volunteers & Student Assistants:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Adult Volunteers:
It has been customary to use adults who volunteer their services to help in the
library media center. This close working relationship with parents and other
adults is useful to free the library media specialist for professional duties. There
should be some orientations to the jobs that parent volunteers are expected to
perform. Adult volunteers may:
* Assist with the circulation of materials
* Prepare overdue notices
* Shelve books and other materials
* Mend books and other printed materials
* Check in periodicals
* Make backups of computer disks
* Read shelves
* Assist in taking inventory
* Type orders, bibliographies, etc.
* Prepare displays
* Read to students.
Student Library Media Assistants:
School library media centers often utilize the service of student assistants. The
key to successful participation is a group of alert, responsible, enthusiastic
student assistants who have been carefully selected by the library media
specialist, who understand their duties and responsibilities, and whose service
to the school is given proper recognition.
131
Media Specialist Substitutes:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
Substitutes:
As a regular member of the faculty, the school library media specialist is entitled
to a substitute in the case of absence. This includes high schools where there are
two professional staff members. The Master Agreement Between the Board of
Education of Howard County and the Howard County Education Association,
Article XIX, “Working Hours and Work Load,” specifies that “Substitutes shall
be provided for all classroom teachers (including media personnel and
specialists) who attend professional conferences and activities, including
inservice meetings held and approved teacher visitations to other schools.”
Because the library media program has many routines, which are different from
those for regular classrooms, it is recommended that the library media specialist
consult with the local school administration about suitable substitutes for the
library media center. Information is provided to principals concerning approved
substitute teachers’ areas of specialty. It is desirable to request a substitute who
has a background in library media services and/or a familiarity with the
particular school and library media center routine. The following information
should be in a file left for the substitute:
* A daily/weekly schedule of library media center classes
* Class lists
* Lesson plans appropriate to the level of each group
* Duty schedule
* Plans for non-class time (e.g., shelving books, typing, etc.)
* List of student library media assistants and adult volunteers, and their
schedule
* A copy of the library media center’s rules
* Other items as specified by the individual school (e.g., school discipline
code, hall passes, etc.)
* Name and location of someone in the building who may be able to answer
questions or provide assistance
* Any other notes which may be helpful.
The library media center should not be closed due to the absence of the library
media specialist.
132
Yearly Goals & Long-Range Plans:
The media specialist is expected to write realistic goals at the beginning of each
school year. The following article provides some useful suggestions for this
somewhat daunting process.
“Things to Consider When Writing Goals and Objectives”
By Martha Alewine
(To download a copy of her article, visit
martha.alewine.googlepages.com/ThingstoConsiderWhenWritingGoalsandO.doc)
As you are writing your goal(s) keep upper-most in your mind how the goal(s) relate to
improving student achievement. National research has consistently documented the
positive effect of the library media specialist and the school library on student
achievement:
- the relationship between the active instructional role of the library media
specialist and student achievement;
- student access to the resources and services of the media center and school
librarian at all times during the instructional day; and
- student access to an up-to-date collection aligned with the school’s
curriculum.
Remember the acronym S.M.A.R.T. when writing your goals:
S – specific, significant (Answers the questions Who? and What? Who will
be involved with me in achieving this goal? What do I want to do or
accomplish?)
M – measurable, meaningful, methodical (Answers the question How?
What strategies, activities, and resources needed to implement or
secure in order to meet the goals? Your objectives should spell out the
“how” for achieving your goals. )
A – appropriate, action-oriented, achievable, attainable (Answers the
question Why? What are your specific reasons for setting this goal?)
R - relevant, realistic, results-oriented, rewarding, reviewed (Also answers
the question Why?)
T – timely, time-bound, trackable (Answers the question When?)
The SMART goal should be a specific, clear, and concise statement of what you want to do,
achieve, or make happen. If your goal is obtuse, vague, or generally unclear, you will lose
focus of what you want to achieve and, consequently, will not meet your goal. Is your goal
significant? Will achieving this goal make a difference in your professional life? In your
library media program? In your students’ academic achievement?
133
Yearly Goals & Long-Range Plans (cont’d):
Achievement of the SMART goal can be demonstrated through measurement, those facts
and figures that backup your anecdotal data. Remember the saying, “What gets measured
gets done.” This aptly applies to your goal(s). Developing benchmarks for goal attainment
helps track your progress and facilitates showing that progress toward achieving your
goal(s). The problem is how to develop those benchmarks. What methods will you use in
working toward your goal that you can measure? Keep in mind what drives your
administrator: data-driven decision-making.
The SMART goal is meaningful for you. This goes back to the fact that your goal should be
significant and relevant for you. If you do not have a vested interest in your goal, your
interest in, and motivation for, achieving your goal will wane over the course of the
evaluation year.
The SMART goal is achievable. Library media specialists’ goals can be long-term (e.g., three
years, five years) but there is an expectation that within the time span that the goal(s) will
be met. Long-term goals emphasize the need for specificity and benchmarks for
measurement. A library media specialist may also set short-term (one school year) goals
but these carry the same requirement for specificity and benchmarks.
Principals and some other evaluators have a tendency to write goals for their staff or those
educators they must evaluate. Often times these goals are not meaningful, significant,
measurable, or relevant to the person’s job. When you have your initial meeting with your
principal (or his/her designee for evaluations), be prepared to present goals that are
relevant and realistic for your job situation.
Writing clear, concise, meaningful goals and relevant objectives is not easy; you must
think at length about your library program and what you want to accomplish that would
strengthen your program and positively effect student learning and achievement. We have
examined the form of your goals (declarative statement that begins with an action verb and
includes definite outcomes achieved within a certain time span). We must now look at
content. To help you think about content, look at the SOCS matrix below:
Strengths
Opportunities
Challenges
Successes
134
Yearly Goals & Long-Range Plans (cont’d):
Think about your total library media program and complete the chart above. What you
include for Opportunities and Challenges may provide some insight for what you set as a
goal or goals. These two areas help you address what might be referred to as shortcomings or deficiencies in your total library media program. Do you see areas where you
could list some things that you would like to achieve, avoid, or eliminate to improve your
library program and, ultimately, improve student achievement?
On the other hand, you might decide to concentrate on your strengths and successes.
Consider what has worked well in the past that you could expand and thereby improve or
enhance your total library media program. Do you see areas that you would like to
preserve or expand that would improve your library media program and, ultimately,
improve student achievement?
B ibli o gra ph y
Creating
S .M.A .R. T . Goals . A v a ila b le o nl ine a t ht t p :/ /ww w .topa c hi e v e men t .c o m / smar t .h t ml .
Acc e ss ed o n Mar c h 2 1 , 2008.
G o al S e tt ing G uide: SMAR T G oal Settin g . A vaila b le onl ine a t ht tp :/ /w w w.go a l-set t in g gu id e .c o m / smar t -goa ls.ht m l. Acc e ss e d on Mar ch 21, 2008.
G o als Grid, The : A T ool fo r Clarifying G oals a nd Obje ctives. A va ilabl e o n line at
htt p :// hom e .att .net /~ ni c ko ls/ goa ls_gr id. htm . A ccess ed Oct o ber 25 , 2001.
Impor tan ce of Obj e ctives, The . A v a ila b le o nl ine a t
htt p :// ub lib .b uffal o .e d u / libra r ie s /projec ts /tl r / import a nce .ht m l. A cce s se d O ctober 2 5 ,
2001.
SM A RT G o als: H ow to Se t a nd A chieve Th e m . A va ila ble o nl in e at
htt p :/ / w ww. t ime t ho u gh t s.co m /goa lsett in g / s m a rt -goal s. htm.
Acc e ss ed Mar c h 2 1 , 2008.
S O CS Mat r ix . (2005) S c hoo l Li b rar y M e di a Se r vic e s. Co lu m bia , S C : S C Depar tmen t of
Ed ucati o n . A v a ilabl e o nl ine a t ht t p :/ /mar t ha.al e win e .go o glep a ge s .c o m .
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Howard County Annual Report:
Date:
School:
Library Media Specialist(s):
I.
Highlights of the Library Media Program (a minimum of three
instructional highlights for the past year). Include examples of
collaboratively planned lessons and units that integrate information
literacy and the Big6 into instruction.
II.
Review of how the library media center provided technology (computer
and/or video) instruction and support for students and staff
* Is the Library Media Specialist the technology coordinator in the
school?
* How has your school utilized the following online resources (please
respond to all that apply to your school): World Book Online,
CultureGrams, SIRS Discoverer Deluxe, SIRS Knowledge Source, SIRS
Decades, Science Resource Center, Gale Student Resource Center Jr., Gale
Student Resource Center Gold, Turnitn, NoodleBib, American Government,
and Gale Opposing Viewpoints.
III.
Involvement of the Library Media Specialist with the School
Improvement Team
IV.
Examples of how the Library Media Program has been promoted to the
administration, staff, and community. Attach supporting
documentation (newsletters, flyers, etc.) if appropriate.
* Describe activities that have been done as part of the A+ Partnership
with the Howard County Library.
V.
Which State Standard(s) did you focus on during this year? What did
you do to move toward the implementation of this standard?
Which State Standard(s) will you focus on during next year? What
activities have you planned to move toward the implementation of this
standard?
VI.
Number of items withdrawn from the library media collection from
April 1, 200_ – March 31, 200_
VII.
Number of book fairs held in your school and who managed each
VIII.
Ways that the Office of Media and Educational Technology can
assist you
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Program & Personnel Evaluation:
Adapted from the Howard County Public School System
Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
The system for observing and evaluating personnel allows for standard
observations, as well as portfolio and peer coaching options. Professional
personnel evaluation procedures are negotiated annually by the Howard County
Education Association. These evaluation procedures appear in the Master
Agreement Between the Board of Education of Howard County and the Howard
County Education Association.
Evaluation
At the beginning of each year, the library media specialist and the principal will
complete a Professional Development and Evaluation Objectives Form. The
principal will use the information on this form, in conjunction with portfolio
development, peer coaching plans, and/or formal and informal observations
throughout the year, to make the annual evaluation of the library media specialist.
The Howard County Public Schools Teacher Evaluation Form will normally be
used for this evaluation.
Observation:
Formal observations by the Coordinator of Media and Educational Technology, as
well as by school administrators, may or may not be part of the evaluation process,
depending on the evaluation method selected by principals and library media
specialists at the local school level.
If formal observations are used, the individual making a formal observation may
choose to observe instruction only or to observe the many aspects of the library
media specialist’s performance in administering the library program. Direct
instruction is usually observed using the Howard County Public School System
Traditional Observation Form.
Review Process for School Library Media Programs in Maryland:
The Maryland State Board of Education has authorized the Maryland State
Department of Education to implement a procedure for conducting periodic
reviews of local education agency school library media programs. The Standards
for School Library Media Programs in Maryland, on which the reviews are based,
can be downloaded at
http://www.howard.k12.md.us/met/media/handbook/appendix/appendix.htm
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Central Office Staff:
Howard County Public School System Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
143
Central Office Staff (cont’d):
Howard County Public School System Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
144
145
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Professional Organizations:
Howard County Public School System Handbook for Library Media Specialists & Administrators
American Library Association (ALA)
50 E. Huron Street
Chicago, IL 60611
www.ala.org
American Association of School Librarians (ALA-AASL)
50 E. Huron Street
Chicago, IL 60611
www.ala.org/aasl/
Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT)
1025 Vermont Avenue, NW, Suite 820
Washington, DC 20005
www.aect.org
Center for Children and Technology
Educational Development Center, Inc.
96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014
Educational Media Association of Howard County (EMAHC)
c/o Office of Educational Technologies/Media
The Howard County Public School System
ERIC Clearinghouse on Information Resources and Technology
Syracuse University
School of Information Studies
4-194 Center for Science and Technology
Syracuse, NY 13233-4100
Howard County Education Association (HCEA)
(includes membership in the Maryland State Teachers Association and the National Education Association)
Contact: School HCEA building representative
Maryland Education Media Organization (MEMO)
P.O. Box 21127
Baltimore, MD 21228
www.tcps.k12.md.us/memo
Maryland Library Association (MLA)
400 Cathedral Street, 3rd Floor
Baltimore, MD 21201
U.S. National Commission on Library and Information Science
1110 Vermont Avenue, NW
Suite 820
Washington, DC 2005
www.nclis.gov
Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education
5112 Berwyn Road
College Park, MD 20740
www.triangle-coalition.org
Maryland Instructional Computer Coordinators Association (MICCA)
www.miccaonline.org
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