Service Transformation
Seminar
Chair: David Walker, Editor, Public Magazine
David Mills, CRM Vice President, Oracle
Siobhan Coughlan, Principal Consultant, Transformation
Government, Improvement & Development Agency
Stefan Czerniawski, Deputy Director – Business Strategy,
Department of Work and Pensions
Martin Willis, Director, INLOGOV
1
<Insert Picture Here>
Delivering Great Customer Service
David Mills
Vice-President, UK, Ireland & Israel
Delivering Service in the Public Sector
“I have found that departments which provide services focus predominantly
not on the citizen, but on an aspect of the citizen called ‘the customer’ …
the end result is that the citizen ... is left to join up … a mass of help-lines,
call centres, front-line offices and websites."
Sir David Varney - Service Transformation Report 2006
“We need more innovative ways of conveying to public service
leaders that transformation is all about the customer”.
Sir Gus O’Donnell, January 2007
The Public Sector isn’t driven by profit.
Excellence in Service Delivery is your key motive for
existence.
Don’t look to learn from UK Industry, teach them how good
you are.
Public Service Exemplars
• Pensions Service
• Waiting time for state pension claim reduced from 60 days to
20 minutes
• More than 40% state pension cases dealt with in ‘one touch’
• New York 311
• Rationalised 40 call centres, 14 pages telephone numbers
• 24 hour day 365 days a year 170 languages to 8 million
citizens
• 20,000 calls a day 80% answered in 30 seconds
• Improved services, raised awareness & method of
engagement
• Resilience - August 2003 power outage 311 continued and
answered 115,000 calls
Quote
‘We have changed people’s lives. This is not just a
citizen’s hotline; it’s the most powerful management
tool ever developed for New York government. I
cannot imagine running the city without it’
M Bloomberg, Mayor, City of New York
Key Factors to Success
• Real customer insight should drive service design
• Challenge delivery models to reduce duplication and
non-value-adding customer contact
• Optimise channel management to make use of
cheaper channels
• Set the standards for best practice and ensure all
channels deliver on those standards
Key Factors to Real Transformation
• Requires fundamental changes to the ‘machinery of
government’
• Leadership – that can drive change
• Cultural shift – customer service mentality
• Shared knowledge pool
• Shared processes across administrative barriers
• Service Transformation is a journey that is ongoing
that requires a shift in the ‘public service mindset’
• Innovation with an element of ‘risk’
<Insert Picture Here>
You Won't Get a
Second Chance – Commerce
You Haven’t Got a
Choice – Public Service
Customers Demand More
Savvy and Connected
Useability
Flexibility
Reliability
Interactivity
Dynamic
Expanded Competition
<Insert Picture Here>
Looking Forward
Build the Right Team
Provide the Right Tools
SOA
BPEL
Key Factors to Real Transformation
• Requires fundamental changes to the ‘machinery of
government’
• Leadership – that can drive change
• Cultural shift – customer service mentality
• Shared knowledge pool
• Shared processes across administrative barriers
• Service Transformation is a journey that is ongoing
that requires a shift in the ‘public service mindset’
• Innovation with an element of ‘risk’
<Insert Picture Here>
Delivering Great Customer Service
David Mills
Vice-President, UK, Ireland & Israel
Service Transformation
Seminar
Chair: David Walker, Editor, Public Magazine
David Mills, CRM Vice President, Oracle
Siobhan Coughlan, Principal Consultant, Transformation
Government, Improvement & Development Agency
Stefan Czerniawski, Deputy Director – Business Strategy,
Department of Work and Pensions
Martin Willis, Director, INLOGOV
19
The Guardian
Public Service transformation – putting the
citizen at the centre
Siobhan Coughlan
19 February 2008
Transformational government
agenda
‘Technology alone does not transform
government, but government cannot transform
to meet modern citizens’ expectations without
it’….
‘The design of citizen-centric services to ensure
effectiveness of delivery to the customer,
achieve policy goals, and to release savings by
reducing duplication and streamlining processes’
Transformational Government Report 2005
21
The Local authority landscape
• 388 LAs in England
• Unitary, County and Districts LAs –
urban & rural
• 21,000 elected councillors
• Post Lyons - Locally determined
services for local customers
• 2007 CPA – 150 top tier LAs, only two 1
star LAs
• Varney Review – LAs as examples of
innovation and customer centric
service delivery
22
The role of local authorities
• Delivers 400 – 600 services locally
(different tiers)
• The front office for many central
government services, e.g. benefits,
education, licensing, etc
• Joins up services for the local community
– local partnership working, LSP, LAA,
etc
• Commissions services – third sector,
private sector, etc,
23
Customer experience of public
services
• Front line services organised
departmentally for specific service areas
• Multiple contact points on the high street
• Different office opening hours
• Different telephony & IT
• Different customer data & information
management systems
• Different training & development
opportunities for staff, (different
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The real customer experience……..
This is the Housing
Department,……
Name? Address?
and date of birth?
This is Adult Social
Services,…
Name? Address
and date of birth?
Social
Housing
This is the
Benefits,….
Name? Address
and date of birth?
Mrs Harris,
10 King Street,
None of your
business
Benefits
Services
Environment
services
Cartoon kindly provided by www.francartoons.com
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Locally delivered services
• Local services are changing & improving
however, expectations are rising, new ‘duty
to involve’
• Local services being delivered within a local
framework and existing partnerships, e.g.
LSP, LAA & MAA
• Local partners are increasingly working
together to meet complex needs of
customers (e.g. shared service
collaborations)
• CAA - new performance framework to
26
Drivers for Service Transformation
27
National Policy Context
Third Sector
Review
Local
Government
Act
Herdan Review
Lyon’s Review
Varney Review
Service
Transformation
Agreement
LGA
‘Closer to
people and
places’
CSR 07
28
Drivers for Service Transformation
• Local Government Act– LAA, MAA
• LGR and Two Tier Pathfinders – reorganisation of local
services
• Local Government new performance framework –198
PIs* and CAA
• Performance indicator NI 14 ‘Avoidable contact’
• CRS 07 – efficiency savings 3% p.a.
• Service Transformation Agreement – Varney Review
• Customer expectations!
29
The Local Government Act
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The Local Government Act
‘To meet this challenge, all councils must adopt
a strategic approach to service delivery. Our
proposal to strengthen the strategic
commissioning role for councils will ensure that
they start from an understanding of the needs
and preferences of users, adopt best practice in
service design, assess the full range of service
delivery options, and implement optimal
solutions that balance quality and value for
money.’
Chapter 7, ‘Efficiency - Transforming Local
Services’
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Local authorities as convenors ……
PCT
Regional
Government
Police
Central
Government
Local
Government
Private Sector
Third Sector
32
Key challenges
• Understanding shared customers using customer
insight, to re organise and deliver services
• Joining up related services, provided by different
organisations, around different customer groups
• Leveraging assets through sharing frontline and back
offices
• Managing and sharing data across the partners to
make it easier for the customer to carry out their
transaction
• Exploiting technology as an effective tool
• Removing duplication and wastage to drive out efficiency
savings through business process improvement
33
Front Office Shared Services
34
Joining up services - FOSS
Programme
• CLG, Cabinet Office, LGA and IDeA
research programme
• To identify and showcase local
government's achievements in
transforming local public services
• ‘Exemplar’ projects - redesign local
public services around the needs and
preferences of citizens
• Shared ‘front office’ partnership and
collaborative arrangements, e.g. one-stop
shops, contact centres, web portals and
mobile services.
35
FOSS Projects
Main report, 'delivering public sector transformation' and Executive
Briefing, ’new designs for public services - delivering better outcomes’
and 16 detailed case studies www.idea.gov.uk/foss
•
•
•
•
•
•
Dorset for You – a single web portal for the citizens of Dorset
Northumbria 101- single number for a range of non emergency services
Staffordshire Moorlands District Council: Councils Connect – series of
OSS including self service kiosks
London: ReportIT - a pan-London service to report street related problems
via the 'Your London' web site
South Yorkshire: [email protected] connects - access to services from a broad range
of agencies over the web, digital TV and mobile telephones
Kent Gateway - multi-agency service in Ashford that delivers public and
voluntary services in a retail environment
36
Key factors for success
• Clear Leadership – political & managerial
• Agreed shared vision across partners –
outcomes focused on customers
• Understanding the needs & engagement
of customers
• Engaging staff – particularly frontline staff
• Partnership working – governance
arrangements
• Exploiting technology & sharing
37
Local Government Delivery Council
38
LGDC - Background
• Post LGOL programme – a voice for local government
• Commissioning of the Varney Review – opportunity for
LG to highlight good practice as well as barriers
• Front Office Shared Services project – real innovation at
a local level
• Support and expertise for local government
representatives on the Delivery Council
39
Objectives
• By local government, for local government
• Principal interface between central and local
government and the local government family
• Provide strategic leadership to sector to fulfils its role in
driving local service transformation
• Be a collective voice for the sector to influence
national policy
• Mirror and co-ordinate with Cabinet Office’s Delivery
Council on the Transformational Government agenda
• Facilitating effective support to councils e.g. good
practice;
• Highlight opportunities & barriers to drive service
transformation
40
Cabinet
Office
LGA
IDeA
Delivery
Council
Contact
Council
CIO
Council
Improvement
Board
LGDC
CEX
Taskforce
RIEPs
Customer
Insight
Forum
41
Deliverables
• Work with key stakeholders LGA, CLG
& Cabinet Office to jointly develop the
vision & work programme across CRS07
• To coordinate activities of the principal
local government agencies around service
transformation
• To highlight and share emerging good
practice, raise problems, issues and
identify gaps in capacity
• To coordinate the links with other key
agencies around local government
transformation,
42
LGDC Representatives
• 13 Local authority representatives from all
regions, tiers, urban & rural LAs (links with
RIEPs & professional bodies)
• Chaired by Janet Callender, CEX
Tameside MBC and one of the local
government representatives on the
Delivery Council
• Local government stakeholders, LGA,
IDeA, CLG
• Central government departments, DWP,
DH
• Third Sector
43
Programme of activities
• National Projects - Public Sector Asset
Review, DWP ‘Tell us Once’, LGR & Two
Tier Pathfinders
• Best Practice & engagement – FOSS
conference May ’08, Beacons,
benchmarking, knowledge & CoPs,
national & regional networks and events
• Performance management – CAA, LG
PIs, Contact councils measures
• Tools & Enablers – data sharing, Gov
Connects, ESD Toolkit, Customer Insight
44
In summary
• Local government leading service
transformation of local public services
• Lots of innovation & good practice
However,
• Need to highlight & share learning more
systematically
• Need to maximise our investments i.e. use
the ‘tools’ already have
• Need to bring local partners together for
45
Service Transformation
Seminar
Chair: David Walker, Editor, Public Magazine
David Mills, CRM Vice President, Oracle
Siobhan Coughlan, Principal Consultant, Transformation
Government, Improvement & Development Agency
Stefan Czerniawski, Deputy Director – Business Strategy,
Department of Work and Pensions
Martin Willis, Director, INLOGOV
46
Beyond transformation
Stefan Czerniawski
48
Everything works well
(except a few things which don’t)
Nothing works well
(except a few things which do)
The Endian Wars
Personal
Responsive to needs
Local flexibility
Customer is a bundle of needs
Setting standards
Measure the interaction
Build with agility from the front
High volume
Compliant with rules
National standards
Customer is a set of entitlements
Controlling processes
Measure the transaction
Build with solidity from the back
Today, I don’t even bother
attempting to communicate directly
with most companies; who wants
to navigate phone-tree hell? If I
have a problem, I poke around on
the Web until I find an answer. If I
don’t, I’ll post a question on the
likeliest Web forum.
Scott Rosenberg
Service Transformation
Seminar
Chair: David Walker, Editor, Public Magazine
David Mills, CRM Vice President, Oracle
Siobhan Coughlan, Principal Consultant, Transformation
Government, Improvement & Development Agency
Stefan Czerniawski, Deputy Director – Business Strategy,
Department of Work and Pensions
Martin Willis, Director, INLOGOV
64
Leadership and
Transformational
Government
Martin Willis, Director
Inlogov (Institute of Local Government Studies)
Guardian/Oracle Seminar
19th February 2008
Seeing the Wood
and the Trees
Martin Willis, Director
Inlogov (Institute of Local Government Studies)
February 2008
Leadership is using your power to
make choices with the
consequence of improving or
maintaining the outcomes of
service delivery to individuals,
communities and citizens
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
Leading and Managing

“Managers are people who do things right
and leaders are people who do the right
thing. The difference may be summarized as
activities of vision and judgement –
effectiveness versus activities of mastering
the routine – efficiency”
[Bennis W & Nanus B (1985) Leaders. New York, Harper & Row p. 33]
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
Leading and Managing

Managing
– Transactional, performance, accountability,
command and control, strategy, planning,
authority, hierarchy, classical/scientific theory

Leading
– Transformational, vision, empowering, inspiring,
emotional intelligence, integrity, networking,
commitment, human relations theory

Two sides of the same coin?
– Task and Process?
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
Leadership Research
What
does research evidence
suggest to us about effective
leadership?
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
The Leaders Role in Quality and Safety
Improvement: Research Summary
Research Question: “What do leaders need
to do to support health care improvement?”
 Evidence to support the importance of
leadership but not conclusive
 Some evidence suggests that professional
leaders have as much, if not more, influence
that top or middle managers
 Evidence about which management actions
are effective is not strong

Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
The Leaders Role in Quality and Safety
Improvement: Research Summary

Combination of conditions are needed for
Q&SI changes, some of which managers can
influence: low resistance, high readiness,
existence of resources and need for change
 Subjective desire for change including a
sense of urgency and pain may be required
 Some studies suggest Q&SI more effective
where leaders skilfully adapt a particular
quality method or approach rather than
inflexibly follow a detailed prescription
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
The Leaders Role in Quality and Safety
Improvement: Research Summary

Specific leader actions which are effective
may vary according to the type of leader role,
the type of improvement, the organisation, its
environment and other factors
[Ovretveit J. (2005) The Leaders Role in Quality and Safety
Improvement: A Review of research and guidance. Faculty of
Medicine, Bergen University, Norway]
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
How can councils meet the challenges of
performance?

Skelcher C et al (2006) Learning from the
Experience of Recovery
– www.inlogov.bham.ac.uk/research/expofrecovery.htm

Three factors explain the ability of councils to
prevent performance decline and to recover
from poor performance
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham

Cognition
– Understanding the organisation’s current
performance
 Capability
– Holding a shared vision of how the council
will recover and improve and using this to
motivate others to take action
 Capacity
– Having the necessary political and
managerial skills to deliver the
improvement vision
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
Capability, Vision and Leadership
People Centred Outcomes
 Outcomes
– the benefits or consequences of a
service on the quality of the lives of
individuals, communities and citizens
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
Public Service Outcomes
Law, values,
policy and
research
evidence
Outcomes
Outputs
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
Processes
Inputs
How do I know if it is any good?

Defining an Outcome Indicator
– A measure of the benefits of a service on
the quality of the lives of individuals,
communities and citizens

Three Broad Outcome Indicators
– Safety
– Happiness
– Development
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
Broad Health Outcomes
Safety - Stay well
Happiness – Live well
Development – Get well
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
BROAD OUTCOMES FOR
CHILDREN
( Chief Secretary to the Treasury (2003) Every Child Matters Cm 5860 p.14)

Being healthy
– Enjoying good physical and mental health and living
a healthy lifestyle (safety and happiness)

Staying safe
– Being protected from harm and neglect (safety)

Enjoying and achieving
– Getting the most out of life and developing the skills
for adulthood (happiness and development)
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
 Making
a positive contribution
– Being involved with the community and
society and not engaging in anti-social or
offending behaviour (development and
safety)
 Economic
well-being
– Not being prevented by economic
disadvantage from achieving their full
potential in life (development)
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
BROAD SOCIAL WELL-BEING
OUTCOMES
[Murphey D (2005) The Social Well-Being of Vermonters http://www.ahs.state.vt.us
Murphey D (2006) Vermont Well-Being 2006 http://humanservices.vermont.gov]

% voting-age population voting in General
Election
 Rate of child abuse and neglect (ages 0-4)
 % Students (grades 9-12) who did not go to
school during past 30 days because they felt
unsafe
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
BROAD SOCIAL WELL-BEING
OUTCOMES
[Murphey D (2005) The Social Well-Being of Vermonters http://www.ahs.state.vt.us
Murphey D (2006) Vermont Well-Being 2006 http://humanservices.vermont.gov]
% Adults who are “binge drinkers”
 % Adults who are obese
 Deaths from lung cancer
 % Population in poverty
 % People with disabilities employed
 Property crimes per 100,000 population
 % Older people (65+) engaged in some
leisure-time physical activity

Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
Leadership and Public Service
Outcomes

“This inquiry saw too many examples of those
in senior positions attempting to justify their
work in terms of bureaucratic activity, rather
than outcomes for people”
[Department of Health (2003) The Victoria Climbié Inquiry. Summary
Report.p.6]
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham

“Whenever
I am feeling overwhelmed
by the problems I am facing, I take a
detour to a school to fill up my tank
with the energy and optimism that I
find in the classroom, I am inspired
by the glimpses of the journey of
learning that teachers are
undertaking with their pupils”
(Tim Brighouse)
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
SEEING THE WOOD
AND THE TREES

Systems Thinking
 “The discipline which unites the others and brings all
together in a pattern that can be understandable –
systems thinking is seeing the wood and the trees ”
[Ref: Senge P. in Pugh D and Hickson D (1996) Writers on Organizations
5th Edition. Penguin, Harmondsworth pp. 204-6]
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
Martin Willis
Director
Inlogov
[email protected]
0121 414 4961
Martin Willis, Inlogov, The University of Birmingham
Service Transformation
Seminar
Chair: David Walker, Editor, Public Magazine
David Mills, CRM Vice President, Oracle
Siobhan Coughlan, Principal Consultant, Transformation
Government, Improvement & Development Agency
Stefan Czerniawski, Deputy Director – Business Strategy,
Department of Work and Pensions
Martin Willis, Director, INLOGOV
88
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Ian Smith Institute for Customer Service