These presentations are being made online
by permission of the writer of In Awe of
Thy Word. These presentations are only a
minute segment from the book. This is a
book that could truly open up a deeper
awareness of the King James Bible. You
will deepen your AWE of His word. This
book is available at 1-800-435-4535
Click your mouse to begin presentation
Translators of the King James Bible
Part II
Like all earlier English Bibles,
it was entitled, the Holy Bible!
(not the King James Version)
Men from Part I
The First Westminster Group
Genesis to II Kings
Dr. Lancelot Andrews
Dr. John Overall
Dr. Hadrian Saravia
Dr. Richard Clarke
Dr. John Laifield
Dr. Robert Tighe
Francis Burleigh
Geoffry King
Richard Thompson
Dr. William Bedwell
Like all earlier English Bibles,
it was entitled, the Holy Bible!
(not the King James Version)
Translators of the King James Bible
Part II
II. The Cambridge Company
These men translated Chronicles to the end of
Song of Solomon
Edward Lively
the
Called “one of the best linguists in the
world,” Lively was a Professor of Hebrew.
He wrote a Latin commentary on the five minor
prophets and authored a book on Bible chronology.
After the death of his wife, he
raised their eleven children alone
Much dependence was placed on his
surpassing skill in the oriental tongues.
He was actively employed in the preliminary
arrangements for the Translation, and appears to
have stood high in the confidence of the King.
But his death, which took place in May, 1605, is said to have considerably
retarded the commencement of the work. Some say that his death was
hastened by his too close attention to the necessary preliminaries.
II. The Cambridge Company
These men translated Chronicles to the end of
Song of Solomon
Dr. John Richardson
the
This “most excellent linguist” and
Professor of Divinity took part in public
debates using only the Latin language.
It is said of Richardson that he was the best as
"language is the armory of the human mind; and
at once contains the trophies of its past, and the
weapons of its future conquests.”
In those days, it was the custom, at seats of learning,
for the ablest men to hold public disputes, in the Latin
tongue, with a view to display their skill in the
weapons of logic, and "the dialectic fence.”
As the ancient knights delighted to display and exercise
their skill and strength in running at and breaking
spears with one another; so the great scholars used to
cope with each other in the arena of public argument,
and strive for literary "masteries."
II. The Cambridge Company
These men translated Chronicles to the end of
Song of Solomon
Dr. Lawrence Chaderton
the
This KJV translator was a convert from
“popery,” and as a consequence, was
disinherited by his family. The library
of Emmanuel College still preserves a
Hebrew Bomberg Old Testament (1518)
that shows his notes in the margin.
He was well conversant in Greek, Latin,
Spanish, French, and Italian, yet this Doctor
of Divinity was described as quite “modest.”
He was called an “excellent preacher,” - after preaching
once for over two hours said, “I will no longer trespass
on your patience.” The congregation called back to him
in unison: “For God’s sake, go on, go on!”
His household help were never permitted to cook or clean for him when church
was in progress. He said, “I desire as much to have my servants to know the LORD,
as myself.” He lived to the ripe age of 103, one biographer notes, a longevity
perhaps attributed to “a living affection for the poor” (Psalm 41:1, 2).
II. The Cambridge Company
These men translated Chronicles to the end of
Song of Solomon
Francis Dillingham
the
This “excellent linguist” debated entirely in
the Greek language. He wrote several books
on the Christian faith and about the “Romish
controversy”
He was noted as a subtle disputant, and was
author of various theological treatises.
He published a Manual of the Christian faith,
taken from the Fathers, and a variety of
treatises on different points belonging to the
Romish controversy.
He was known as the "Great Grecian" because
of his debating skills in the Greek language .
II. The Cambridge Company
These men translated Chronicles to the end of
Song of Solomon
the
Dr. Roger Andrews
Dr. Andrews, who had been Fellow in
Pembroke Hall, was Master of Jesus
College, Cambridge.
II. The Cambridge Company
These men translated Chronicles to the end of
Song of Solomon
the
Thomas Harrison
This KJV translator was a chief examiner of
those who sought to be professors of Hebrew
and Greek at Trinity College in Cambridge.
Historians see him as one of the poets engaged
in the translation.
II. The Cambridge Company
These men translated Chronicles to the end of
Song of Solomon
the
Dr. Robert Spaulding
Dr. Spaulding was Fellow of St. John's
College, Cambridge. He succeeded
Edward Lively, as Regius Professor of
Hebrew.
II. The Cambridge Company
These men translated Chronicles to the end of
Song of Solomon
the
Dr. Andrew Bing
In course of time he succeeded Geoffry King,
who was Dr. Spaulding's successor, in the
Regius Professorship of Hebrew.
III. The Oxford Company
These men translated from Isaiah to
end of the Old Testament.
the
Dr. John Harding
He was President of Magdalene
College and a professor of Hebrew!
III. The Oxford Company
These men translated from Isaiah to
end of the Old Testament.
Dr. John Rainolds
the
This child prodigy entered college at the age
of 13 and quickly became a lecturer in Greek
and later President of Corpus Christi College.
He was a convert from Romanism to Christianity
and successfully won public debates with Romanist.
In his great love for precious lost Catholic people, he
wrote a 600-page paper with Biblical facts. He showed
it to a “papist” confined to the Tower of London. He
took the extended tract to him and prayed with him,
“God give you both a soft heart and an understanding
mind that you may be able wisely to discern and gladly
to embrace the truth when you shall hear it.”
He became “a most
able and successful
preacher.”
“Unto us Christians, no land is strange, no ground
unholy ...and every faithful company, yea, every
faithful body, a temple to serve God in. The presence of
Christ among two or three, gathered together in his
name, maketh any place a church”
III. The Oxford Company
These men translated from Isaiah to
end of the Old Testament.
Dr. John Rainolds
the
“His memory was little less than
miraculous,” therefore he was called “a
living library, and a third university.”
He practiced a style of writing called
Euphuistic, “which was based on alliteration
and classic patterns of formal balance.”
He wrote a pamphlet entitled, “The Overthrow of
Stage Plays,” which chided theatrical dramatizations
because they tend to “inflame youth …
...with love, entice him to dalliance, to whoredom, to
incest, to injure their minds and bodies to uncomely,
dissolute, railing, boasting, knavish, foolish,
brainsick, drunken conceits, words, and gestures.”
On his death bed, he wrote his testimony of faith saying, “These are to testify to
all the world, that I die in the possession of that faith which I have taught all my
life, both in my preaching and in my writings, with an assured hope of my
salvation, only by the merits of Christ my Saviour”
III. The Oxford Company
These men translated from Isaiah to
end of the Old Testament.
Dr. Thomas Holland
the
As a student, it was said of him that he was so
"immersed in books," that this propensity
swallowed up almost every other.
The translation being finished, be spent most of his
time in meditation and prayer. Sickness and the
infirmities of age quickened into greater life his
desires for heaven. In the hour, of his departure he
exclaimed, "Come, Oh come, Lord Jesus, thou bright
and morning star! Come, Lord Jesus; I desire to be
dissolved and be with thee."
It is said of him, "that he had a wonderful knowledge
of all the learned languages, and of all arts and
sciences, both human and divine.
Whenever he took a journey, he first called together the Fellows of his College,
for his parting charge, which always ended thus, "I commend you to the love of
God, and to the hatred of all popery and superstition!"
III. The Oxford Company
These men translated from Isaiah to
end of the Old Testament.
Dr. Richard Kilby
the
He was the King’s Professor of Hebrew
and wrote a commentary on Exodus.
He begged his listeners to receive Christ as he did,
“Consider well what he hath done for you...when you
were by sin made like the devil, and must therefore have
been condemned to hell torments, God sent his only Son,
who taking unto him a body and soul, was a man and
suffered great wrong and shameful death, to secure your
pardon, and to buy you out of the devil’s bondage, that
ye might be renewed to the likeness of God... to the end
ye might be fit to keep company with all saints in the
joys of heaven...”
He was a well
known poet…
“With truth, repentance and right faith
Mine heart and soul fulfill,
That I may hate all wickedness,
And cleave fast to thy will”
III. The Oxford Company
These men translated from Isaiah to
end of the Old Testament.
Dr. Miles Smith
the
In addition to his expertise in Greek, Latin
and Hebrew, Smith was as familiar with
Chaldee, Syriac, and Arabic, as he was with
his native tongue.
He wrote the Preface to the KJV, entitled,
The Translators To the Reader.
He was discerning in doctrine, detesting the high
church formalism of Queen Elizabeth’s era.
His contemporaries called him a “very
walking library,” a gift that served him well
when he and Bilson served as the final
editors of the King James Bible.
III. The Oxford Company
These men translated from Isaiah to
end of the Old Testament.
the
Dr. Richard Brett
This expert in Chaldee, Arabic, Ethiopic and
Latin, as well as Greek and Hebrew, authored
several books written entirely in Latin.
History records, “He was a most vigilant pastor, a
diligent preacher of God’s word, a liberal
benefactor to the poor, a faithful friend, and a good
neighbor.”
III. The Oxford Company
These men translated from Isaiah to
end of the Old Testament.
the
Daniel Fairclough
He stood in such high estimation, that Sir
Thomas Edwards, ambassador to France, took
him to Paris as his chaplain, where he spent
two or three years in the ambassador's house.
Here he held many "tough disputes" with the
doctors of the Sorbonne, and other papists.
His opponents termed him "the keen and
cutting Featley," and found him a match in
their boasted logic; "For he a rope of sand could
twist, as tough as learned Sorbonnist."
IV. The Second Oxford Company
These men translated the four Gospels, the Acts of the
Apostles, and the Revelation of St John the Divine.
Dr Thomas Ravis
He died before his task was well begun,
on the 14th of December, 1609.
On account of his high offices, and his dying
before the translation was completed, it is not
probable that he took so active a part in that
business as some of his colleagues.
Though too much carried away by a zeal for
the forms of his Church, which was neither
according to knowledge nor charity,
IV. The Second Oxford Company
These men translated the four Gospels, the Acts of the
Apostles, and the Revelation of St John the Divine.
Dr George Abbot
His parents had suffered under the hand of
bloody Queen Mary. Such family zeal thrust
him to the position of Archbishop of
Canterbury and Primate of all England.
King James filled such posts with men like
Abbot and Miles, because like King James I, they
detested high church formalism.
He wrote a book entitled,
A Brief Description of the Whole World.
In it he described North America saying, “A huge
space of earth hath not hitherto by any Christian to
any purpose been discovered, but by those near the
sea coast it may be gathered that they all which do
there inhabit are men rude and uncivil, without the
knowledge of God.”
IV. The Second Oxford Company
These men translated the four Gospels, the Acts of the
Apostles, and the Revelation of St John the Divine.
Dr George Abbot
He described those living in its
“northwest” as “addicted to witchcraft and
adoration of devils, from which they could
not be persuaded to abstain even in the very
presence of our countrymen.”
He was overwhelmed with grief when a hunting
accident, through his error, caused the death of a
gamekeeper. He gave funds to support the man’s
widow and fasted monthly for her the rest of his
life.
He published lectures on the book of Jonah, and
numerous treatises, mostly relating to the
political and religious occurrences of the times.
IV. The Second Oxford Company
These men translated the four Gospels, the Acts of the
Apostles, and the Revelation of St John the Divine.
Dr Richard Eedes
In his younger days, he was given, like
some other fashionable clergymen, to
writing poetry and plays…
…but, in riper years, he became, as the
antiquarian of Oxford says, "a pious and grave
divine, an ornament to his profession, and
grace to the pulpit."
He published several discourses at different times.
Dr. Eedes died at Worcester, November 19th, 1604,
soon after his appointment to be one of the Bibletranslators, and before the work was well begun, so
that another was appointed in his place.
But let him not be deprived of his just commendation, as one who was counted
worthy of being joined with that ablest band of scholars and divines, which
was ever united in a single literary undertaking.
IV. The Second Oxford Company
These men translated the four Gospels, the Acts of the
Apostles, and the Revelation of St John the Divine.
Dr Giles Tomson
Dr. Tomson took a great deal of pains in his
part of translation of the Bible, which he did
not long survive.
He was consecrated Bishop of Gloucester,
June 9th, 1611; and a year after, June 14th,
1612, he died, at the age of fifty-nine, "to the
great grief of all who knew the piety and
learning of the man."
IV. The Second Oxford Company
These men translated the four Gospels, the Acts of the
Apostles, and the Revelation of St John the Divine.
Sir Henry Savile
His skills ranged from tutor to Queen
Elizabeth in Greek and Mathematics, to
translator of the Histories of Tacitus.
He traversed Europe gathering “rare” Greek
manuscripts of the Bible and ancient
manuscripts of the works of the great fourth
century Greek preacher, John Chrysostom
The latter he complied and published in an eightvolume set. The writings of Chrysostom allowed
the KJV translators to see first hand, the true text
of the earliest Greek New Testament.
IV. The Second Oxford Company
These men translated the four Gospels, the Acts of the
Apostles, and the Revelation of St John the Divine.
Dr John Peryn
The few items on his life still serve to
show that he was fit to take part, with his
learned and reverend brethren, in
preparing our English Bible for the press.
IV. The Second Oxford Company
These men translated the four Gospels, the Acts of the
Apostles, and the Revelation of St John the Divine.
Dr Ralph Ravens
This was the Vicar of Eyston Magna,
who was made Doctor of Divinity in
1595. He died in 1616.
It is thought that he did not act, for some
reason, under the King's commission; and that
Doctors Aglionby and Hutten were appointed
in place of him, and of Eedes, who died before
the work was begun.
IV. The Second Oxford Company
These men translated the four Gospels, the Acts of the
Apostles, and the Revelation of St John the Divine.
Dr John Harmar
This translator debated the ‘popish’ doctors
at the Sorbonne numerous times. He also
translated some of Chrysostom’s Greek
writings into Latin, as well as translating
Beza’s French sermons into English.
Of him too it may be said, "having had a
principal hand in the Translation," that he
was worthy to rank with those, who gave the
Scriptures in their existing English form, to
untold millions, past, present, and to come.
V. The Fifth Company of Translators at Westminster
These men translated all of the Epistles of the New Testament.
Dr William Barlow
A member of the New Testament
committee, Barlow chose as the motto
for his seal: “… sit down in the lowest
room…” showing the meekness of
yet another committee member. (from
Luke 14:10)
V. The Fifth Company of Translators at Westminster
These men translated all of the Epistles of the New Testament.
Dr John Spencer
He became a lecturer in Greek at the
early age of nineteen at Corpus Christi
College, Oxford.
Like King James, he “dreaded Puritanism
[Calvinism] quite as much as Popery” and
later became the King’s chaplain.
His wife was the great niece of Thomas
Cranmer, the archbishop of Canterbury who was
burned at the stake by bloody Queen Mary
His death took place on the third day of April,
1614, when he was fifty-five years of age.
Of his eminent scholarship there can be no question. He was a valuable
helper in the great work of preparing our common English version. We
have but one publication from his pen, and printed after his decease, of
which it is said that it is "full of eloquence, and striking thoughts."
V. The Fifth Company of Translators at Westminster
These men translated all of the Epistles of the New Testament.
Dr Roger Fenton
For many years, he was "the painful, pious,
learned, and beloved minister" of St.
Stephen's, Walbrook, London, to which he
was admitted in 1601
None was fitter to dive into the depths
of school divinity.
He was taken early from the University, and
had many troubles afterward; yet he grew, and
brought forth fruit.
Never a more learned hath Pembroke Hall brought forth…
V. The Fifth Company of Translators at Westminster
These men translated all of the Epistles of the New Testament.
Dr Ralph Hutchinson
Dr. Hutchinson, at the time of his
appointment, was President of St. John's
College, having entered that office in 1590.
This, which marks him as a learned
man, is all we can tell of him.
We can find nothing of his birth nor at
what place nor do we find a record of any
kind concerning his death.
V. The Fifth Company of Translators at Westminster
These men translated all of the Epistles of the New Testament.
William Dakins
The King in his letter to the Mayor and
Aldermen of London, calls him "an ancient
divine," not in allusion to his age, but his
character.
This appointment was given him as a remuneration
for his undertaking to do his part in the Bibletranslation. He was considered peculiarly fit to be
employed in this work, on account of "his skill in
the original languages."
V. The Fifth Company of Translators at Westminster
These men translated all of the Epistles of the New Testament.
Michael Rabbet
All we can tell of him is, that he was a
Bachelor in Divinity, and Rector of the
Church of St. Vedast, Foster Lane, London.
V. The Fifth Company of Translators at Westminster
These men translated all of the Epistles of the New Testament.
Thomas Sanderson
The bare name is all that is left to us
with any certainty.
Others
Leonard Hutton
When confronted with petty church
infighting, which even today, keeps
many Christian brothers and sisters at
bay, he said…
“How much better were it to turn these
forces that are spent upon, against the
common adversary who maketh this
strife of ours a fit occasion and
instrument to overthrow our common
faith” Galatians 5:15
Others
Thomas Bilson
This distinguished poet, Bishop, and
theologian, always defended the literal
sense of the Bible.
Although not a translator, he was called
“commander in chief in spiritual warfare,”
He was involved with the final editing on the Bible.
The notes that KJV translator John Bois made
concerning word options still pending at the close
of the project, give the impression that many final
decisions on wording were yet to be made when
Bilson and Smith received the text.
Bilson’s straight theology and poetic talent, along with Smith’s, Paine
feels, “brought to the final editing its real inspiration”
Others
Richard Bancroft
This Bishop of London was not a translator,
but is mentioned in the Translators’ Preface as
“chief overseer” of the production of the Bible.
Thomas Fuller, church historian in the 1800s,
said Bancroft “well hardened the hands of
his soul” from handling “nettles and briers”
(e.g. Ezek. 2:6).
When handed a libelous letter, Bancroft
responded, “Cast it to an hundred more
which lie here on a heap in my chamber”
“Dissenters, whether popish or puritan
[Calvinist]” piled his desk with complaints.
Others
Samuel Ward
Ward was remembered in poetry that called him
“skilled in tongues, so sinewy in style; Add to all
these that peaceful soul of thine, Meek & modest...”
He kept a personal diary during his college
days, which is still available today. In it he
shows that “knowledge” follows “virtue” and
must be followed by “temperance.”
In his diary, he chides himself:
May 23: My sleeping without remembering my last
thought, which should have been God.
June 14: My negligence… in hearing another
sermon sluggishly.
May 26: …dullness this day in hearing God’s word – the
sin of pride -By-thoughts at prayer time.
King James was
ugly, vulgar,
nervous & foulmouthed.
The translators
were worldly,
sensuous and
self-serving.
Now, compare all of what you
just read to the dark and vile
propaganda printed by Rupert
Murdoch’s Harper Collins
Publishers (owner of Zondervan),
the publisher of the NIV and
TNIV, in a book named God’s
Secretaries.
The Greek New Testament has
been concocted by illiterate halfstarved visionaries in some dark
corner of a Graeco-Syrian slum.
The latter translators of today
have made correct and more clear
the corrupt manuscripts that the
King James followed.
“It is an appalling fact
that the manner of speech
which approaches must
nearly to the language of
these Jaobean divines
(KJV translators) comes
from the mouths of
murderous
fundamentalists.”
He admits,
whether it is
true or not
matters less
than the
atmosphere.
He calls those
who disagree
with him
“extremists”
and “extreme
schismatics
from the outer
reaches of
Anabaptist
lunacy.”
…Stand thou still
a while, that I
may shew thee
the word of God.
The End
Descargar

Slide 1