Imaginative Writing…
how to write a narrative (short
story)
• express understanding of “the importance of
being fair”…
0 Show clear understanding of :
1. ideas,
2. attitudes,
3. beliefs
About “being fair” , by “representing”
1. Social ideas, attitudes and beliefs
2. Cultural ideas attitudes and beliefs
3. Historical / location ideas attitudes and beliefs
of individuals – groups – communities – places and events
“representing”
Social ideas, attitudes and beliefs
Cultural ideas attitudes and beliefs
Historical / location ideas attitudes and beliefs
of individuals – groups – communities – places and events
0 DON’T describe ideas about being fair
0 DON’T write a recount about being fair
0 DON’T use essay-style analytical language / words
0 DO “show” the ideas about being fair (dialogue / language style /
metaphors / similes / personification… )
0 DO “show” the character’s and their respective attitudes to
being fair
0 DO USE LANGUAGE – STRUCTURES – FORMS which show being
fair
Topics for the story
Select ONE of the quotations as the opening for a piece of
imaginative writing that explores the challenges of being fair
‘I am outside the door.’
OR
‘We want to believe this is how it was . . .’
OR
‘I felt expelled and exiled . . .’
Short story?
0 Have a clear theme. What is the story about? That doesn't mean what is the
plot line? It means… what is the underlying message or statement behind the words.
Get this right and your story will have more importance in the minds of your readers.
0 A good short story covers a very short time span. It may be one
single event that becomes a “life-changing” moment in the life of the character
0 Don't have too many characters. Have only enough characters to show
the theme. Two contrasting characters will do the trick.
0 Make every word count. There is no room for wordy explanations in a short
story. If each word is not working towards putting across the theme, delete it.
0 Focus… on developing your theme – your main character – and resolving a conflict /
issue / problem
Show vivid imagery in short stories…
0 Use specific, concrete details / names:
An example from Upon a Mystic Tide:
“Sitting in her old, red rocker, Miss Hattie turned on the large,
antique radio behind her. Big band era music drifted through the
kitchen, and she softly hummed along with it. Her head bowed, she
studied the embroidery in her lap. She was sewing the Seascape
Inn logo onto a new batch of crisp, white napkins.”
In this example, the specific and concrete details are: the red
rocker, the large, antique radio, embroidering napkins, the big
band music and humming.
Show vivid imagery in short stories…
0 More specific and concrete details…
0 Don't write tree. Write oak.
0 Don't write emotion. Write fear or sorrow, guilt or shame.
0 Don't write dog. Write Doberman, or Yorkie.
0 Don't write chair. Write rocker.
0 Write cinematically. Write vivid images that create
pictures in the reader's mind just like the scenes you
see in a film
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Area of Study Paper 1 – Section II: Imaginative Writing