LEARNING COLLABORATIVE
CONVENING
Central Region
October 28, 2013
AGENDA
• INTRODUCTIONS
• OVERVIEW OF ISSUES
• FACILITATED DISCUSSION TO :
• DISCUSS CURRENT STATUS OF LOCAL IMPLEMENTATION
• IDENTIFY HIGH PRIORITY AREAS OF REGIONAL CONCERN AND
BEGIN BRAINSTORMING
• IDENTIFY ISSUES FOR STATEWIDE SUPPORT AND RESOLUTION
• IDENTIFY TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE NEEDS
• NEXT STEPS FOR REGIONAL COLLABORATION
GOALS FOR TODAY
•
•
•
•
•
•
Establish a cohesive regional group
Learn current status of regional implementation
Identify top 5 priority areas
Identify issues for statewide support and resolution
Identify training and TA needs
Establish timeline, schedule, format(s) for regional meetings
and communication
Hospitalizations for Mental Health Issues, by Age Group: 2007 - 2011
(Age Group: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Number of hospitalizations for mental health issues among children and youth ages 5-19, by age group.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, Special Tabulation by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (Feb. 2013).
California Dept. of Finance, 2000-2010 Estimates of Population by Race/Ethnicity with Age and Gender Detail; and State and County Population
Projections by Race/Ethnicity and 5-year Age Groups, 2010-2060 (by year). Accessed at http://www.dof.ca.gov (Feb. 2013).
Hospitalizations for Mental Health Issues, by Age Group: 2007 - 2011
(Age Group: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Number of hospitalizations for mental health issues per 1,000 children and youth ages 5-19, by age group.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, Special Tabulation by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (Feb. 2013).
California Dept. of Finance, 2000-2010 Estimates of Population by Race/Ethnicity with Age and Gender Detail; and State and County Population
Projections by Race/Ethnicity and 5-year Age Groups, 2010-2060 (by year). Accessed at http://www.dof.ca.gov (Feb. 2013).
Hospitalizations for Mental Health Issues, by Age Group: 2007 - 2011
(Age Group: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Number of hospitalizations for mental health issues among children and youth ages 5-19, by age group.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, Special Tabulation by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (Feb. 2013).
California Dept. of Finance, 2000-2010 Estimates of Population by Race/Ethnicity with Age and Gender Detail; and State and County Population
Projections by Race/Ethnicity and 5-year Age Groups, 2010-2060 (by year). Accessed at http://www.dof.ca.gov (Feb. 2013).
Hospitalizations for Mental Health Issues, by Age Group: 2007 - 2011
(Age Group: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Number of hospitalizations for mental health issues per 1,000 children and youth ages 5-19, by age group.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, Special Tabulation by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (Feb. 2013).
California Dept. of Finance, 2000-2010 Estimates of Population by Race/Ethnicity with Age and Gender Detail; and State and County Population
Projections by Race/Ethnicity and 5-year Age Groups, 2010-2060 (by year). Accessed at http://www.dof.ca.gov (Feb. 2013).
Hospitalizations for Mental Health Issues, by Age Group: 2007 - 2011
(Age Group: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Number of hospitalizations for mental health issues among children and youth ages 5-19, by age group.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, Special Tabulation by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (Feb. 2013).
California Dept. of Finance, 2000-2010 Estimates of Population by Race/Ethnicity with Age and Gender Detail; and State and County Population
Projections by Race/Ethnicity and 5-year Age Groups, 2010-2060 (by year). Accessed at http://www.dof.ca.gov (Feb. 2013).
Hospitalizations for Mental Health Issues, by Age Group: 2007 - 2011
(Age Group: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Number of hospitalizations for mental health issues per 1,000 children and youth ages 5-19, by age group.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, Special Tabulation by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (Feb. 2013).
California Dept. of Finance, 2000-2010 Estimates of Population by Race/Ethnicity with Age and Gender Detail; and State and County Population
Projections by Race/Ethnicity and 5-year Age Groups, 2010-2060 (by year). Accessed at http://www.dof.ca.gov (Feb. 2013).
Hospitalizations for Mental Health Issues, by Age Group: 2007 - 2011
(Age Group: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Number of hospitalizations for mental health issues among children and youth ages 5-19, by age group.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, Special Tabulation by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (Feb. 2013).
California Dept. of Finance, 2000-2010 Estimates of Population by Race/Ethnicity with Age and Gender Detail; and State and County Population
Projections by Race/Ethnicity and 5-year Age Groups, 2010-2060 (by year). Accessed at http://www.dof.ca.gov (Feb. 2013).
Hospitalizations for Mental Health Issues, by Age Group: 2007 - 2011
(Age Group: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Number of hospitalizations for mental health issues per 1,000 children and youth ages 5-19, by age group.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, Special Tabulation by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (Feb. 2013).
California Dept. of Finance, 2000-2010 Estimates of Population by Race/Ethnicity with Age and Gender Detail; and State and County Population
Projections by Race/Ethnicity and 5-year Age Groups, 2010-2060 (by year). Accessed at http://www.dof.ca.gov (Feb. 2013).
Hospitalizations for Mental Health Issues, by Age Group: 2007 - 2011
(Age Group: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Number of hospitalizations for mental health issues among children and youth ages 5-19, by age group.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, Special Tabulation by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (Feb. 2013).
California Dept. of Finance, 2000-2010 Estimates of Population by Race/Ethnicity with Age and Gender Detail; and State and County Population
Projections by Race/Ethnicity and 5-year Age Groups, 2010-2060 (by year). Accessed at http://www.dof.ca.gov (Feb. 2013).
Hospitalizations for Mental Health Issues, by Age Group: 2007 - 2011
(Age Group: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Number of hospitalizations for mental health issues per 1,000 children and youth ages 5-19, by age group.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, Special Tabulation by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (Feb. 2013).
California Dept. of Finance, 2000-2010 Estimates of Population by Race/Ethnicity with Age and Gender Detail; and State and County Population
Projections by Race/Ethnicity and 5-year Age Groups, 2010-2060 (by year). Accessed at http://www.dof.ca.gov (Feb. 2013).
Depression-Related Feelings, by Grade Level: 2008-2010
(Grade Level: All; Answer: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Percentage of students in grades 7, 9, and 11, and non-traditional students, reporting whether in the past 12 months, they had felt so
sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or more that they stopped doing some usual activities. The grade levels included in school
district-level data depend on the grades offered in each school district; for example, high school districts do not include 7th grade data. "Nontraditional" students are those enrolled in Community Day Schools or Continuation Education.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, California Department of Education, California Healthy Kids Survey (WestEd).
http://www.wested.org/chks
Depression-Related Feelings, by Grade Level: 2008-2010
(Grade Level: All; Answer: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Percentage of students in grades 7, 9, and 11, and non-traditional students, reporting whether in the past 12 months, they had felt so
sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or more that they stopped doing some usual activities. The grade levels included in school
district-level data depend on the grades offered in each school district; for example, high school districts do not include 7th grade data. "Nontraditional" students are those enrolled in Community Day Schools or Continuation Education.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, California Department of Education, California Healthy Kids Survey (WestEd).
http://www.wested.org/chks
Depression-Related Feelings, by Grade Level: 2008-2010
(Grade Level: All; Answer: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Percentage of students in grades 7, 9, and 11, and non-traditional students, reporting whether in the past 12 months, they had felt so
sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or more that they stopped doing some usual activities. The grade levels included in school
district-level data depend on the grades offered in each school district; for example, high school districts do not include 7th grade data. "Nontraditional" students are those enrolled in Community Day Schools or Continuation Education.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, California Department of Education, California Healthy Kids Survey (WestEd).
http://www.wested.org/chks
Depression-Related Feelings, by Grade Level: 2008-2010
(Grade Level: All; Answer: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Percentage of students in grades 7, 9, and 11, and non-traditional students, reporting whether in the past 12 months, they had felt
so sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or more that they stopped doing some usual activities. The grade levels included in school
district-level data depend on the grades offered in each school district; for example, high school districts do not include 7th grade data. "Nontraditional" students are those enrolled in Community Day Schools or Continuation Education.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, California Department of Education, California Healthy Kids Survey (WestEd).
http://www.wested.org/chks
Depression-Related Feelings, by Grade Level: 2008-2010
(Grade Level: All; Answer: All)
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Percentage of students in grades 7, 9, and 11, and non-traditional students, reporting whether in the past 12 months, they had felt so
sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or more that they stopped doing some usual activities. The grade levels included in school
district-level data depend on the grades offered in each school district; for example, high school districts do not include 7th grade data. "Nontraditional" students are those enrolled in Community Day Schools or Continuation Education.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, California Department of Education, California Healthy Kids Survey (WestEd).
http://www.wested.org/chks
Child Population: 2009 - 2013
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Definition: Estimated population under age 18.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, California Dept. of Finance, Race/Ethnic Population with Age and Sex Detail, 1990-1999, 2000-2010, 20102060 (May 2013); U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Estimates, Vintage 2012 (June 2013).
Number of Children in Foster Care: 2008 - 2012
Note: Double-click this table to adjust the table formatting.
Region
Number
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2,584
2,482
2,356
2,025
1,822
San Luis Obispo
County
371
307
322
338
365
Santa Barbara County
579
607
549
565
531
89
95
95
98
106
Fresno County
Tuolumne County
Definition: Number of children under age 21 in foster care as of July 1 of each year.
Data Source: As cited on kidsdata.org, Needell, B., et al. (Apr. 2013). Child Welfare Services Reports forCalifornia, U.C. Berkeley Center for Social
Services Research; U.S. data come from Child Trends analysis of Adoption & Foster CareAnalysis & Reporting System data by the National
DataArchive on Child Abuse & Neglect, as cited on KIDS COUNT (Apr. 2013).
Katie A. Readiness Assessment
Summary for Central Region
Learning Collaborative
AGENCY LEADERSHIP
This section relates to leadership’s experience implementing family-centered services in a collaborative setting.
CW and MH leadership have an articulated strategy for collaborating across systems to ensure family centered practices have system-wide support.
Need
Developing
Strength
1
2
SLO
3
SB
T
F
CW and MH leadership create and support opportunities for collaborative projects between agencies.
SB
T
SLO
F
CW and MH leaders have a shared vision of family -centered care.
SLO
SB
F
T
CW and MH leaders share responsibility and accountability for implementing timely services.
Timely is defined according to local practices.
Forums exist for information sharing and cross -system problem solving that include families and other
community partners.
T
SB
SLO
F
SLO
SB
T
F
Families and other community members have a meaningful role in oversight of services and quality
improvement activities.
Interagency and Community Committees are in place to ensure policies and practices are consistent with
family-centered principles of care.
SB
T
F
SLO
SB
T
CW and MH leaders regularly discuss issues affecting access to services.
SLO
F
SLO
SB
F
T
CW and MH leaders regularly discuss issues affecting quality of services.
SLO
SB
T
F
Subtotal
Agency Leadership Score
10
36
70 OR 17.5 avg.
24
SYSTEMS AND INTERAGENCY COLLABORATION
This section addresses how collaborative approaches (such as teaming) are used when serving children and families.
(See pg.12 - 16 of the Core Practice Model (CPM) Guide)
Collaboration is supported through formal agreements, such as memorandums of understanding, joint
training plans, or interagency strategic plans that articulate strategies and mechanisms for meeting the
needs of children and families.
Need
Developin
g
Strength
1
2
3
SLO
SB
T
F
Agencies have a shared approach to addressing issues related to consent and confidentiality.
SLO
SB
T
SB
SLO
F
T
F
Agencies provide opportunities for joint training to staff and families.
Agencies have an established process for reviewing, changing, and implementing policies and
procedures that support family-centered practices.
F
SB
SLO
T
Agencies have structures and processes in place that support collaboration with other organizations
that are interested in children’s issues such as, primary care, schools, libraries, local parks and
recreation, or others.
SB
T
SLO
F
Agencies have co-located office space or staff.
Agencies have information systems that support sharing of child welfare and mental health data.
T
SLO
SB
F
T
SB
SLO
F
Processes are in place to share and receive feedback at the practice, program, and system levels in order
to solve problems and enhance success.
T
SB
SLO
F
Subtotal
Systems and Interagency Collaboration Score
13
30
55 OR 13.75 avg.
12
SYSTEMS CAPACITY
This section speaks to the collective strength of administrative structures, workforce capacity, staff skills & abilities, an d operating
resources (See pages 20 – 23of the CPM Guide)
Need
Developing
Strength
1
2
2
Children and youth in the CW system are screened for possible mental health needs.
T
F
SB
SLO
Children and youth in the CW system who are referred to mental health receive a timely full mental health assessment.
Timely is
defined according to local practices.
F
SB
SLO
T
Policies in place support an effective referral process and linkage to services in multiple systems.
F
SB
SLO
T
There are effective processes and sufficient supports in place to recruit, hire, and train personnel.
SB
SLO
F
T
Factors may include timeliness to hire, expertise of human resources staff, written training materials
Staff receive ongoing training, and are mentored and coached by experienced managers to ensure staff maintain high quality sk ills and
abilities.
T
SB
F
SLO
Agencies utilize partnerships with other public agencies and community -based organizations to ensure that children and families can
access a variety of services and supports in multiple settings.
SB
T
SLO
F
Agencies engage the local community through activities that may include partnering with community -based organizations and hostin g
public meetings or community forums.
SLO
SB
T
F
There is a sufficient child welfare workforce in place.
SLO
F
T
SB
There is an adequate network of qualified mental health service providers available.
SLO
T
SB
F
Administrative processes and organizational infrastructure are sufficient to meet business and procurement needs.
T
SB
F
SLO
Subtotal
Systems Capacity Score
12
50
71 OR 17.75 avg.
9
SERVICE ARRAY
This section addresses if available services are culturally responsive and include trauma informed care, evidence based practices,
promising practices, innovative practices, and culturally specific healing practices and traditions.
(See pg. 16 – 18 of the CPM Guide)
Need
Developing
Strength
1
2
3
Children and families are assessed for immediate safety, stabilization, and crisis support needs.
SB
T
SLO
F
Services are tailored to meet specific, individual needs and build on individual strengths.
SB
T
SLO
F
Services are community-based, delivered in the least restrictive environment, and in the child and family’s own
language.
Available services support transitions to the community, independence, and the adult system of care.
SB
SLO
F
T
SLO
T
SB
F
Available services include the use of evidence -based practices.
T
SB
SLO
F
Families have access to services that focus on prevention and early intervention.
Services are sufficient to meet the mental health needs of the community.
Where service gaps exist, alternative strategies, such as cultural healing practices or other non -traditional services
and supports, are explored.
F
T
SB
SLO
SB
SLO
F
T
T
SLO
SB
F
Services for children and families include trauma informed care.
T
SB
SLO
F
Subtotal
Service Array Score
6
42
75 OR 18.75 avg.
27
CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS
This section addresses agency ability to work effectively in cross-cultural settings.
Need
Developing
Strength
1
2
3
F
T
SB
SLO
The cultural identity of children and families is valued, and reflected in service planning and delivery.
Diversity and language among agency staff reflects that of the community.
F
SB
T
SLO
Staff are respectful of cultural differences in customs and beliefs.
T
F
SLO
SB
Training is provided to staff regarding diversity and culturally competent practices.
Published materials such as informational brochures and forms are translated into languages that
reflect the diversity of the local community.
Children and families have access to services delivered in their own language.
F
T
SB
SLO
F
T
SB
SLO
F
SB
T
SLO
Service plans are translated into the family’s native language and discussed to ensure understanding.
Agencies partner with culturally based community groups to ensure programs and services are
culturally appropriate to meet the community’s needs.
F
T
SB
SLO
F
SLO
T
30
36
SB
Subtotal
Cultural Responsiveness Score
5
71 OR 17.75 avg.
OUTCOMES AND EVALUATION
This section focuses on the strength of current data collection practices and how outcomes data is used to
inform programs and practice.
Agencies have a defined process that includes participation of families, direct service providers, agency
staff, and other key stakeholders to define, select, and measure quality indicators at the program,
service, and community levels.
Need
Developing
Strength
1
T
2
3
F
SLO
SB
Evaluation plans define specific goals and objectives, as well as m easurable performance indicators.
T
SB
F
T
Evaluation plan describes how data informs quality improvement processes.
SB
Data collection occurs for measures of administrative, fiscal, program, service, and individual child and
family outcomes.
Data collection relates to process indicators, functional outcomes for children and families, satisfaction
surveys from children and families, and fiscal measures.
Subtotal
Outcomes and Evaluations Score
SLO
SLO
F
T
SB
F
SLO
F
SB
6
T
SLO
22
37 OR 9.25 avg.
9
FISCAL RESOURCES
This section is focused on how fiscal policies, practices, and expertise support family -centered services.
Need
Developing
Strength
1
2
3
Agencies have a basic understanding of what needs to be funded and what the approximate cost
will be.
F
SLO
T
SB
Fiscal agreements that include commitment of funds are in place to support the needs of children,
youth, and families.
T
F
SB
SLO
Agencies track expenses for the cost of mental health services for children and youth in the CW
system.
F
SLO
SB
T
Agencies utilize multiple funding streams to support the mental health needs of children and youth
in the CW system.
F
SB
T
SLO
Staff receives training on the time study process.
Cross-systems training include fiscal strategies and funding requirements.
F
T
SB
SLO
F
SB
T
SLO
Policies and procedures describe strategies to blend funds from federal, state, and local sources to
maximize ability to meet the needs of children and families.
T
F
SLO
SB
Interagency teams and collaborative projects include fiscal expertise.
F
T
SB
SLO
Subtotal
Fiscal Resources Score
4
38
69 OR 17.25 avg.
27
KEY FOR ABOVE RATINGS IN CHARTS:
Need:
Item is not present at all in one or both organizations
Developing: Item is planned or is currently present in a low or modest level in both
organizations
Strength:
Item currently has a strong presence throughout both organizations
DELIVERY PLAN THEMES
1.
Use of Children’s System of Care
2.
Utilize Wraparound
3.
Use 24/7 crisis response team for children and their families
4.
Use county work groups to work out issues related to roll out of implementation plan
5.
Use MTFC and ITFC
GAPS IDENTIFIED
1.
Need for ongoing MH evaluations
2.
Co- location of MH and Child Welfare staff
3.
Issues around group homes including availability and capacity issues
4.
Out of county placements
5.
Services in all geographical areas within the county
POTENTIAL TRAINING AREAS
1.
Cross system training on policies/procedures, data sharing, involvement on family through
continuum of planning, service, and evaluation.
2.
Formal training for staff, current/former foster youth and families, care providers, contract
provider agencies serving children at risk, cultural brokers, child advocates and other community
stakeholders using vision, values, and practice model.
3.
Trauma informed care
4.
Screening tool
5.
Training of staff on working more closely with family members in strength based mode.
6.
Training on how to connect families with community supports.
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