Australian Curriculum: Languages
Draft Shape of the Australian Curriculum: Languages
Consultation 31 January to 7 April 2011
Phases of curriculum development
20102010-2012
2008-2011
Development
of the
Australian
Curriculum for
English,
Mathematics,
Science and
History
Development
of the
Australian
Curriculum for
Geography,
Languages
and The Arts
Development
of the
Australian
Curriculum for
the remaining
areas
identified in
the Melbourne
Declaration on
Educational
Goals for
Young
Australians
Timeline for Languages
TBA
2012
National
From Aug consultation
Aug
2009 –
Sept
2010
Initial
advice
paper
31 Jan
2011 –
7 April
2011
Consultation on
draft
Shape
paper
July
2011
Publication of
Shape
paper
2011
Curriculum
outline,
scope &
sequences,
content
descriptions
and
achievement
standards
Online
publication
Development of draft Shape paper
Lead writer:
Assoc. Prof. Angela Scarino
Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics
Australian Languages contributor:
Dr Jakelin Troy
Assistant Professor, University of Canberra
Languages Advisory Panel and an Expert Group
for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Languages
NSW: Curriculum context
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80 courses in 35 languages
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The most studied languages are Chinese
(Mandarin), French, German, Indonesian,
Italian, Japanese and Spanish

Languages syllabuses are derived from
curriculum frameworks: K-10 and Stage 6
NSW: Curriculum context (2)

Board of Studies syllabus frameworks
Languages K-10
Aboriginal languages K-10
Stage 6 Beginners
Continuers
Extension
Heritage
Background speakers
About the draft Shape paper …
Introduction: history, challenge and an opportunity
Languages as a learning area in the
Australian Curriculum
 Essential features of languages as a learning
area
 Rationale
 Distinctiveness of languages in the
curriculum

Key concepts and understandings
in learning languages
Language
 Culture
 Relationship between language and
culture
 Understanding language learning as an
intercultural process
 Understanding language learning and
literacy development

Key concepts and
understandings (2)

Understanding the learning of Australian
languages
The learners, pathways and time on
task
The learners
 Pathways
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second language learners
home user language learners
first language learners
Time on task
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300-400 hours K-6
130-160 hours 7-8
Further 130-160 hours 9-10
Further 200-240 hours 11-12
Curriculum design for languages
Aims

Communicating in the target language

Understanding language, culture and their relationship,
and thereby developing an intercultural capability in
communication

Self awareness: understanding self as communicator
Curriculum design for languages (2)
Organisation of learning in languages: strands
Communicating: using language for communicative
purposes
Understanding: analysing language as a resource for
making meaning
Reciprocating: interpreting self in relation to others as
language users
Curriculum design for languages (3)
The nature of knowledge, skills and understanding in the learning of
languages
Knowledge of the language
Skills (knowing how)
Understanding (knowing that and knowing why)
Curriculum design for Languages (4)
General capabilities and languages
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Literacy
Information and communication technology skills
Critical and creative thinking
Ethical behaviour
Personal and social competence
Intercultural understanding
Curriculum design for languages (5)
Cross curriculum priorities

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories
and cultures

Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia

Sustainability
Curriculum design for languages (6)
Key considerations

Key considerations for developing the
Australian Curriculum: Languages
Curriculum design for languages (7)
Key considerations
Staging of development
 Three specific curricula for Chinese and Italian
(second language learners, home user language
learners, first language learners)

Specific curricula for subsequent languages to be
developed only for learners in the Australian context
(e.g. French for second language learners only)
Curriculum design for languages (8)
Key considerations

Relationship between hours of study and
achievement standards for second
language learners, home user language
learners and first language learners.
Curriculum design for languages (9)
Key considerations

The development of an Australian
Languages Framework
Curriculum design for languages (10)
Key considerations

The proposed staging of development for
specific languages
What aspects of the draft Shape paper are likely to attract attention?
Content organisation and terminology
Broad implications for states and territories:
 different content and content organisers
 use different curriculum terms, or similar terms in different ways
 different exit points and credentialling for senior students
 different indicative/mandatory hours of study for languages,
particularly K-10
 different context for Australian (Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander) languages, including the range and nature of languages
and learner groups
 different priorities for the staged development of specific
languages
What aspects of the draft Shape paper are likely to attract attention?
Implications for New South Wales
What are the broad implications of the draft Shape of the Australian
Curriculum: Languages for NSW?
 The inclusion of Languages as a key learning area in primary
curriculum, with 300-400 indicative hours of study
 Teacher supply for curriculum guarantee
 The need for flexible delivery, e.g. online learning to ensure
accessibility for learners
 The diversity of learner pathways in K-10: second language
learners, home user language learners, first language learners and
implications for teaching, learning and assessment.
What aspects of the draft Shape paper are likely to attract attention?
Implications for New South Wales
What are the broad implications of the draft Shape of the Australian
Curriculum: Languages for NSW?
 The staged process of development of language specific curricula
and the rationale for prioritisation of languages
 The appropriateness of the proposed development of a Framework
for Australian (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) languages for
the NSW context.
How does the Shape paper
address…
A curriculum for the future – how well does the
draft Shape paper take account of contemporary
and future practices in Languages learning?
2010-2012 Development
and consultation
TBA Publication
TBA Implementation
Anticipating new strategies,
Global trends, theories,
technologies?
What is the Curriculum and Learning Innovation
Centre doing in relation to consultation for the
draft Shape paper?
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Analysis of draft Shape paper – key considerations
PPT with mapping and key considerations
Web updates, network communications and Yammer groups
Cross-directorate briefings, responses and reference groups
Regional video conferences for teachers K-12
Online forums and surveys
Meetings with the Primary Principals Association and Secondary
Principals Council
School Education Director meetings
Meetings with other key stakeholders, including foreign government
consulates and education agencies
Collation of feedback and final response
What can Languages teachers do?
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Regularly check the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and
Reporting Authority website for news and register for their enewsletter:
http://www.acara.edu.au/home_page.html
Regularly check the Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre’s
website,
http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/secondary/lan
guages/index.htm
Provide feedback through consultation processes to the Australian
Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, Board of Studies,
NSW Department of Education and Training.
Contacts
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Julie Flynn
Group Leader Languages, HSIE and Health PE
Ph: 02 9886 7644 Fax: 02 9886 7160
[email protected]
Nina Conomos
Senior Curriculum Support Officer, Languages K-12
Ph: 02 9886 7511 Fax: 02 9886 7160
[email protected]
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