Grado
Pre-evaluación para el 3er trimestre
Lectura de texto informativo
Important Information
A.
This booklet is divided into two parts…
1.
Teacher’s Resources
a.
Page 1 – 15
2.
Students Assessment
b.
Page’s 16 – 33
This booklet is intended for pre-assessing reading informational standards RI4, 8
and 9 at the beginning of the third quarter as well as Research Targets 2,3 and 4
as applicable. Do NOT allow students to read the passages before the
assessment.
Students who do not read independently should be given the assessment as a
listening comprehension test. Do NOT read the passage to the students until it is
time for the assessment.
Printing Instructions…
Be sure you have printed a teacher’s Edition!
Please print the teachers directions (pages 1 – 15). Read the
directions before giving the assessment.
Print pages 16 – 33 for each student.
This would print each student page as an 8 ½ X 11 page…
or login to the Print Shop and order pre-assessments and/or CFAs.
NEW CCSS Lexile Band (range)
Grade
Band
Current
Lexile Band
CCSS
Lexile Band*
K–1
N/A
N/A
2–3
450L–725L
420L–820L
4–5
645L–845L
740L–1010L
6–8
860L–1010L
925L–1185L
9-10
960L–1115L
1050L–1335L
11–CCR
1070L–1220L
1185L–1385L
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
2
Types of Readers
Independent Readers:
Students read selections
independently without reading
assistance.
Non-Independent Readers:
(Please indicate on record sheet if
student is Not an Independent Reader)
Read the selection and questions
aloud to the student in English or
Spanish.
Students complete the selected
response answers by shading in the
bubble.
Kindergarten
Kindergarten teachers should follow
the kindergarten teacher directions as
“Listening Comprehension.”
Read the selected response answers
to the student.
Students complete the constructed
response answers by writing a
response for each question.
Read the constructed response
answers to the student. You may
write the answer the student says
unless he/she is able to do so.
Selected and Constructed Response Questions
Note: The constructed response questions do NOT assess writing proficiency and
should not be scored as such.
Selected Response - Quarters 1 - 4
Students answer 10 Selected
Response Questions about the
passages.
Constructed Response - Quarters 1 and 2
Students answer 2 Short Response
Constructed Response Questions about
the passages.
Constructed Response - Quarters 3 and 4
Students answer 2 Research Constructed
Response Questions about the passages.
Scoring Options
Class Check-Lists (Reading Learning Progressions form)
Write and Revise
There is a learning progression “Class Check-List” for each
standard assessed. This is to be used by the teacher for
recording or monitoring progress if desired (optional).
Write and Revise are added to the pre-assessments and
CFAs in quarters 2, 3 and 4. They are not “officially”
scored on any form, but will be scored on SBAC.
DOK Guide 
Path to DOK - 2
Path to DOK - 1
Grade 3 Sample
Path to DOK 2
Informational Text
Learning Progressions
End Goal
DOK 1 - Ka
DOK 1 - Kc
Locate specific
text features
(i.e., key words,
sidebars,
hyperlinks) from
a text read and
discussed in
class.
Define (understand and
use) Standard Academic
Language: key words,
sidebars, hyperlinks,
relevant, efficiently,
topic and text
features/tools.
DOK 1 - Cf
Answers
questions
about the
purpose of
different text
features and
search tools.
DOK 2 - Ch
Concept
Development
Understands
that search or
text features
(tools) can
provide
information
about a text or
topic.
DOK 2 - Cl
DOK 2 - APn
Standard
Locate
information using
key words,
sidebars or
hyperlinks (and
other search
tools/text
features) relevant
to a topic.
Obtain and
Interpret
information using
key words,
sidebars or
hyperlinks relevant
to a topic.
RI3.5 Use text features
and search tools (e.g.,
key words, sidebars,
hyperlinks) to locate
information relevant to
a given topic efficiently.
Student Name
Student Self-Scoring
Class Summary Assessment Sheet
This is a spreadsheet to record each quarter’s preassessment and CFA. Selected Responses (SRs) are given
a score of “0” or “1.” Constructed Response (CRs) in
quarters 1 and 2 are given a score on a rubric continuum
of “0 – 3,” and in quarters 3 and 4 a research score on a
rubric continuum of “0-2."
Students have a self-scoring sheet to color happy faces
green if their answers are correct or red if they are not.
Student Reflection
The last page in the student assessment book is a
reflection page. Students can reflect about each question
they missed and why. Teacher prompts may help
student’s reflect (such as: What was the question asking,
can you rephrase it?).
Scoring forms are available at:
http://sresource.homestead.com/index.html
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
3
Write and Revise
The Common Core standards are integrative in nature. Student
proficiency develops and is assessed on a continuum.
The HSD, Common Formative Assessment (CFA) for quarter three
includes three write and revise assessed categories to prepare
our students for this transition in conjunction with our primary
focus of Reading Informational Text.
Quarter 3
1. Students “Read to Write” integrating basic writing and
language revision skills.
Write and Revised Assessed Categories for Quarter Three
a.
Writing: Write and Revise (revision of short text)
b.
Language: Language and Vocabulary Use (accurate use of
words and phrases)
c.
Language: Edit and Clarify (accurate use of grammar,
mechanics and syntax)
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
4
Note-Taking
Teachers....
Feel free to use the note-taking forms if you wish or use what you’ve
been using in your classrooms and have had success with.
If you use the provided note-taking form, your students need to have had
practice with the form before the assessment.
Each student will need a note-taking form for each passage. The form is located
in the teacher’s instructional section.
All underlined words on the note-taking form are grade-level standard specific
academic language.
Important information about note-taking:
During a Performance Task, students who take notes as they re-read a passage for
specific details that promote research skills (main idea/topic, key details,
conclusion) will later be able to find answers to questions more efficiently.
Reading the questions first and then the looking in the text for the answer is a
good practice, however not all answers to higher level or inferred questions have
explicit answers within a text.
1.
Read the text through to get the “gist” without the distraction of finding
answers or note-taking.
2.
Re-read the text. Take notes using a note-taking form.
3.
Read and answer the questions. Students may find some answers to
highlight if they are not inferred or explicit although many research
questions are of a higher level.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
Planning to Write a Full Composition
Informational Full-Composition Performance Task Prompt
What ideas and details in the
passages explain why humpback whales are special?
OPTIONAL! (By 4th quarter students will be asked to write a full composition. For now, you can do a
whole group guided practice, modeled demonstration or skip the experience all together)
Teachers....
Your students are preparing to write a full composition. Part 1 of a performance
task is part of that preparation (read paired passages, take notes and answer SR
and CR questions).
During Part 2 of a performance task students are allowed to look at their notes
and SR and CR questions to gather information to plan a full informational writing
piece using the performance task prompt (above).
If you would like your students to have the experience of “planning” a full
informational composition after completing Part 1 (this assessment) here are
a few ideas:
1.
Find a graphic organizer you’ve used before to plan a writing piece.
2.
Give explicit-direct instruction of the grade-level process allowing students
to use their paired passages, notes and SR and CR responses.
3.
Be sure students know the criteria before they begin (what you are
expecting them to do).
4.
Share exemplary models of completed graphic organizers. Review the
criteria.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
Important Please Read Before Starting Assessment
Quarter Three Preparing for Performance Tasks
The quarter three pre-assessment prepares students for performance tasks. There are many
combinations of claims, targets and standards that can be used within a performance task.1
Performance tasks have two parts (Part 1 and Part 2). In quarter three students will complete the tasks
highlighted below.
Performance Tasks Have Two Parts
The underlined sections are those scored on SBAC.
Part 1
•
•
•
Part 2
Read two paired passages.
Take notes while reading (note-taking).
Answer SR and CR research questions about sources
•
Plan your essay (brainstorming pre-writing).
•
•
Write, Revise and Edit W.5
Writing a Full Composition or Speech
IMPORTANT – NEW
Please make copies of the note-taking form for each student
in your class if you choose to use it.
1. Note-Taking: Students take notes as they read passages to gather information about their sources. Students are
allowed to use their notes to later write a full composition (essay). Note-taking strategies should be taught as
structured lessons throughout the school year in grades K – 6. A note-taking form is provided for your
students to use for this assessment or you may use whatever formats you’ve had past
success with. Please have students practice using the note-taking page in this document before the actual
assessment if you choose to use it.
2. Research: In Part 1 of a performance task students answer constructed response questions written to measure a
student’s ability to use research skills. These CR questions are scored using the SBAC Research Rubrics rather than the
short response rubric used in quarters 1 and 2. The SBAC Research Rubrics assesses research skills students need in
order to complete a performance task.
3. Planning: In Part 2 of a performance task students plan their essay. They are allowed to use their notes. This is the
brainstorming or pre-writing activity. Students can plan their writing using a graphic organizer.
Note: During the actual SBAC assessment (grades 3 – 6) you may not be allowed to give students a pre-made
note taking form or graphic organizer. Students may have to develop their own as they read.
Student Directions: Your students have directions in their student assessment booklet. They are a
shortened version of what the directions will actually look like on the SBAC assessment. Please remind
them to read the directions.
1Performance tasks (PT) measure complex assessment targets and demonstrate students' ability to think and reason. Performance tasks produce fully
developed writing or speeches. PTs connect to real life applications (such as writing an essay or a speech or producing a specific product).
http://www.smarterbalanced.org/sample-items-and-performance-tasks/.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
7
Research Note-Taking In the Classroom
The note-taking forms are scaffolded in grades K – 6 following the recommended
SBAC research targets and embedded standards.
http://www.smarterbalanced.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/ELA-Literacy-Content-Specifications.pdf
Research Informational Text Standards:
(RI.3: Standard 3 is included as resource in the development of research and writing as it
supports connecting information between and within texts).
RI.9: Final Task Goal: Students are able to compare and contrast – find similarities
and differences within or between texts for a specific purpose.
The note-taking forms in this assessment support the above goal and the following
assessed research targets:

Research Target 2
Locate, Select, Interpret and Integrate Information

Research Target 3
Gather/ Distinguish Relevance of Information

Research Target 4
Cite evidence to support opinions or ideas
Writing Research Standards:
Writing Standard 7: Shows and builds knowledge about a topic
Writing Standard 8: Analyzes information for a purpose
Writing Standard 9: Supporting with evidence and reason
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
S
R E-
Grade 2
read
SOMETHING
NEW
E
EXPLAIN
MORE
A
AGAIN
and
AGAIN
R
RELEVANT
OR NOT?
C
CONCLUDE
H
HAVE
EVIDENCE
Write one new key idea (special focus) you learned about the main topic.
Instruct students to choose a paragraph or
section or you may choose for them (if this is
classroom practice).
Ask, “Does the paragraph or section state
something new about the main topic (remind
them of the main topic)? “This is a key idea
about the topic.
In grade two students are introduced to
“special focus” in lieu of key idea.
Introduce the term in class parallel with
key idea. Explain to students, “A special
focus explains why a key idea is so special.
If the key idea in a paragraph is that
whales can sing, it could be a special focus
because it is so unique.”
Ask students to write the new key idea in one
brief sentence.
1
What is the special focus of the key idea?
Use key details from the paragraph or section.
What is the special focus of the key idea?
Use key details from the paragraph or section.
Ask students to look for key details that explain more
about the new special focus of the key idea.
Remember students
will need to have a
note-taking form for
each passage.
Key details give evidence to support a key idea.
Instruct them to write 1 -2 key details in each box.
Example if the main topic is about dogs, then if...
“The dog likes to play,” (is the key Idea),
Some key details might be:
• the dog likes to play fetch.
• the dog likes to play with the ball.
2
What is so special about the fact that dogs like to play?
Perhaps because they make fun pets.
Write one sentence that tells the most about the special focus of the key idea and the key details.
Students write only one sentence
that tell the most about the new
key idea and key details.
Summarizing is a big part of writing
conclusions. It is an extremely
important strategy for students to
learn in order to use research skills
effectively.
Differentiation:
Students who need more pages – print as needed. In grade
two you can scaffold students to start with one paragraph or
section and move to more throughout the year. Students
who would benefit from enrichment can continue on with
more sections or paragraphs.
3
Students who need more direct instruction – teach each part
in mini lessons. These concepts can be taught separately:
• Main Topic
• Key Ideas
• Key Details
• Summarizing
ELL Students may need each part taught using language
(sentence) frames emphasizing transitional words.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
9
Grado 2
R ELee
S
ALGO NUEVO
E
EXPLICAR MÁS
A
UNA Y
OTRA VEZ
R
C
¿RELEVANTE
O NO?
CONCLUSION
H
TIENE
EVIDENCIA
Nombre________________ Pasaje____________ Idea principal____________
Escribe una idea clave nueva (enfoque especial) que aprendiste sobre el tema principal.
¿Cuál es el enfoque especial de la idea clave?
Usa detalles claves del párrafo o sección.
¿Cuál es el enfoque especial de la idea clave?
Usa detalles claves del párrafo o sección.
Escribe una oración que mayormente trate sobre el enfoque especial de las ideas
claves y detalles claves.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
10
Quarter Three Pre-Assessment Reading Informational Text Learning Progressions with
Adjustment Points (in purple).
End Goal
DOK Guide
DOK 1 - Ka

Path to DOK
1,2
Informational
Text
Learning
Progressions
Path to DOK - 2
Path to DOK - 1
Grade 2
Locate
specific
words and
phrases in
an
informatio
nal text
read and
discussed
in class.
DOK 1 - Kc
Use and
understand
Standard
Academic
Language:
determine,
words,
phrases and
topic.
DOK 1 - APg
DOK 2 -Ch
DOK 2 - APn
Use
accurate
words and
phrases to
explain
who, what,
where,
when or
how about
an
informatio
nal topic..
2.4b
L.2.4c Use
Determine a known
the meaning root word
of the new
as a clue to
word
the
formed
meaning of
when a
an
known
unknown
prefix is
word with
added to a
the same
known word root (e.g.,
(e.g.,
addition,
happy/unha additional)
ppy,
.
tell/retell).
Path to DOK - 2
Concept
Developm
ent:
Understan
ds that
specific
words and
phrases
have
meaning
that is
relevant to
the text
they are in.
Use context
to identify
and
determine
the meaning
of words
and phrases.
L.2.4a Use
sentencelevel context
as a clue to
the meaning
of a word or
phrase.
Standard
Identify…
L.2.4d
compound
word
meanings
based on
individual
words
within.
RI.2.4
Determine the
meaning of
words and
phrases in a text
relevant to a
grade 2 topic or
subject area.
L.2.5b
distinguish
shades or
meaning
among
Path to DOK - 3
closely
related verbs
DOK Guide 
DOK 1 - Ka
Recall reasons
about a topic
the author
makes in a
text read and
discussed in
class.
Grade 2
DOK Guide

DOK 1 - Kc
DOK 1 - Cf
Define and
Can answer
understand
questions
Standard
about
Academic
specific
Language:
points in a
reasons,
text read
support,
and
specific points, discussed in
author, text
class.
Path to DOK - 1
DOK 2 DOK 2 - Ch
Ck
Concept
Identifies
Development: specific
Understands
points
that there are the
reasons
author
authors make makes
specific points
text.
DOK 2 Cl
Locate
reasons
to
support
points
the
author
makes.
Path to DOK - 2
DOK 2 APs
Distingui
sh
between
reasons
that do
and do
not
support
specific
points.
End Goal
DOK 3 - AN-z
DOK 3 - Cu
DOK 3 - EVC
Standard
Answers a
Cites
RI.2.8 Describe
question that evidence to how reasons
requires
explain
support specific
students to
logically an points the author
connect
author’s
makes in a text.
reasons to
reason for
supporting
making a
points in a
specific
new text.
point.
Path to DOK - 3
DOK - 4
End Goal
DOK 1 - Ka
Recall
basic
facts in
two texts
Path DOK 4 on the
same
Informationa
topic
l Text
read and
Learning
discussed
Progressions in class.
Student NAME
Select
appropriate
words or
phrases
connected to a
specific topic
read and
discussed in
class.
L.2.4e Use
glossaries and
beginning
dictionaries…
DOK 1 - Cf
Path to DOK - 1
Grade 2
Path to DOK 3
Informational
Text
Learning
Progressions
DOK 1 - Ce
DOK 1 - Kc
Define and
understand
Standard
Academic
Language:
compare and
contrast,
points,
important
and topic
DOK 1 - Ce DOK 1 - Cf
Select
appropria
te
domainspecific
words
when
discussin
g the
topic.
Answer
questions
about the
most
importan
t points
in a text
read and
discussed
in class.
DOK 2 - Ch
Concept
Developme
nt:
Student
understand
s that some
points are
more
important
than others
and can
give an
example.
DOK 2 - Ck DOK 2 - Cl
Identifies
the most
importan
t points
in two
texts on
the same
topic.
Locates
key
details as
evidence
of which
informati
on is
importan
t in two
texts on
the same
topic
(new
text).
DOK 2 ANp
Categoriz
es or lists
importan
t points
from two
texts on
the same
topic
using a
graphic
organizer
(teacher
has
provided
categorie
s).
DOK 2 - ANs
Using a list
of
categorized
important
points in
two texts
on the
same topic,
can discuss
similarities
and
differences
between
the two
texts.
DOK 3 ANy
DOK 3 Cu
Standard
Complet
es a
Venn
diagram
to
compar
e and
contrast
importa
nt
points in
two
texts on
the
same
topic.
RI.2.9
Compare and
contrast the
most
important
points
presented by
two texts on
the same topic
(answers
constructed
response CFA
questions at
this level).
DOK 4 - SYU
To move to a
DOK-4
students
analyze points
in two texts in
order to write
a new
generalization,
observation or
conclusion
about the
topic.
1
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
11
 SBAC Reading Assessment
Three Assessed Research Targets (Constructed Response Rubrics)
Constructed Response Research Rubrics
Target 2
Locate, Select, Interpret and Integrate Information.
2
The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to locate, select, interpret and
integrate information within and among sources of information.
1
The response gives limited evidence of the ability to locate, select, interpret and
integrate information within and among sources of information.
0
A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to locate, select,
interpret and integrate information within and among sources of information.
Constructed Response Research Rubrics
Target 3
evidence of the ability to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information such
as fact from opinion
2
The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to distinguish relevant from
irrelevant information such as fact from opinion.
1
The response gives limited evidence of the ability to distinguish relevant from
irrelevant information such as fact from opinion.
0
A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to distinguish
relevant from irrelevant information such as fact from opinion.
Constructed Response Research Rubrics
Target 4
ability to cite evidence to support opinions and ideas
2
The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to cite evidence to support
opinions or ideas.
1
The response gives limited evidence of the ability to cite evidence to support opinions
or ideas.
0
The response gives no evidence of the ability to cite evidence to support opinions or
ideas.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
12
3er Trimestre Pre-evaluación Respuestas construidas investigativas: Guía de respuestas
Respuestas Construidas
11.
RI.2.8, Objetivo de Investigación 2
Escribe una lista de puntos importantes para mostrar cómo los patines han
cambiado a lo largo de los años. Usa ejemplos de ambos artículos.
Rúbricas de Investigación de Respuesta Construida Objetivo 2
Localiza, selecciona, interpreta e integra información
Maestra(o) /Rúbrica “Respuesta de Lenguaje”
La respuesta: da pruebas suficientes de la capacidad de buscar y seleccionar información sobre el tema
sugerido. Evidencia suficiente para buscar y seleccionar información, sería encontrar ejemplos
específicos de puntos importantes que apoyen cómo los patines de ruedas han mejorado. Si la
información no apoya cómo los patines han mejorado, el estudiante no reconoció que el cambio a
lo largo de muchos años fue uno para mejorar los patines de ruedas. Las instrucciones no piden
que se explique cómo los patines han mejorado porque la información integrada les debe ayudar a
llegar a esta conjetura por sí solos.
La respuesta: da pruebas suficientes de la capacidad para interpretar e integrar información sobre el
tema sugerido. Las instrucciones requieren usar ejemplos (3-5 son suficientes) de ambos pasajes.
Esto es integración de información. Interpretar información sería llegar a una conclusión (los
patines mejoraron).
Ejemplo del “Lenguaje ” de Respuesta del Estudiante
El estudiante integra 5 ejemplos claros y detalles de cómo los patines de ruedas han cambiado. El estudiante
interpreta que los patines han mejorado.
Los patines de ruedas han cambiado. Los primeros patines de ruedas sólo tenían dos ruedas de metal
2
1
0
pequeñas. Los próximos patines que se inventaron tenían tres ruedas. Eran muy difíciles de usar porque
no podían girar. Entonces James Plimpton inventó patines con cuatro ruedas que podían girar. Esto hizo
a los patines fáciles y divertidos de usar. William Brown hizo ruedas para patines que los hicieron aún
mejores y más rápidos. Hoy en día a la gente le gusta usar patines en línea. Ahora a la gente le gusta
patinar porque los inventores hicieron patines mejores y más fáciles de usar.
El estudiante da un ejemplo limitado de cómo los patines han cambiado, pero con pocos detalles. El estudiante no
establece que los patines han mejorado.
Los patines de ruedas son ahora más fáciles de usar porque ahora son mejores. Ellos son mejores
porque los inventores los hicieron mejores. Un inventor también hizo un patín que podía girar mejor.
El estudiante no da suficiente información relevante para responder a las instrucciones.
Me gusta patinar, pero me caigo. Algunas personas hacen patines. Ellos son llamados inventores.
Hacia RI.2.8 y Objetivo de la Investigación 2
Objetivo de la Investigación 2:
Localizar, seleccionar, interpretar e integrar la información.
RI2.8
Describe cómo las razones apoyan los puntos específicos que el
autor hace en un texto.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
13
3er Trimestre Pre-evaluación Respuestas construidas investigativas: Guía de respuestas
Respuestas Construidas
12.
RI.2.9, Objetivo de Investigación 3
¿En qué son iguales La historia de los patines de ruedas y El
padre del patinaje sobre ruedas? ¿En qué son diferentes? Usa
ejemplos de ambos artículos para completar el diagrama.
Rúbricas de Investigación de Respuesta Construida Objetivo 3
Evidencia de la capacidad para distinguir entre información relevante e irrelevante,
tal como hechos y opiniones
Maestra(o) /Rúbrica “Respuesta de Lenguaje”
La respuesta: da pruebas suficientes de la capacidad para distinguir entre la información relevante e
irrelevante sobre el tema sugerido. A los estudiantes se les presenta un diagrama Venn para listar las
similitudes, diferencias y detalles compartidos entre los dos pasajes. La información en todas las categorías
debe ser relevante a la pregunta (hechos que muestren las tres categorías específicamente) y no información
extraña. La información relevante para mostrar que los pasajes son los mismos debe incluir información
sobre James Plimpton, encontrada en ambos pasajes (hizo el primer patín de cuatro ruedas, el primer patín
que podía girar, sus patines eran fáciles de usar). Sobre la información que es diferente, en La historia de los
patines de ruedas podrían incluir los nombres de los inventores, fechas y cómo cada patín era mejor que el
anterior. Sobre la información que es diferente en El padre del patinaje sobre ruedas, se debería incluir
información sobre la vida de James que no se mencionó en La historia de los patines de ruedas (hay muchos
detalles listados).
Ejemplo del “Lenguaje ” de Respuesta del Estudiante
2
El estudiante presenta suficientes detalles relevantes (4-5 hechos) de ambos pasajes, con diferencias y
detalles compartidos (“detalles iguales” [2-3 hechos]) entre ambos pasajes.
1
El estudiante presenta detalles relevantes limitados (2-3 hechos) de ambos pasajes , con diferencias y
detalles compartidos (“detalles iguales” [1 hecho]) entre ambos pasajes.
0
El estudiante no presenta evidencia de que distingue entre información relevante e irrelevante del tema.
Datos de
El padre del patinaje sobre
ruedas
•James Plimpton vivía en una
granja
•El trabajó en tiendas de
máquinas.
•El se enfermó.
•El patinó sobre hielo para
mejorar su salud.
•El abrió la primera pista de
patinaje.
•El escribió un libro de cómo
enseñar a la gente a patinar.
Datos compartidos entre
ambos pasajes.
•James hizo el primer patín de
cuatro ruedas.
•Sus patines fueron los primeros
en poder girar.
•Sus patines eran fáciles de usar.
Hacia RI.2.9 y Objetivo de la Investigación 3
Objetivo 3
Prueba su capacidad para distinguir entre la relación relevante
y la irrelevante, tal como hechos y opiniones.
RI2.9
Compara y contrasta los puntos más importantes que se
presentan en dos textos sobre el mismo tema.
Datos de
La historia de los patines de ruedas.
•John Merlin hizo el primer patín en 1760.
•El primer patín tenía dos 2 ruedas.
•Mr. Petibled hizo un patín con 3 ruedas .
 Era difícil de usar.
•James Plimpton hizo un nuevo patín en
1863.
 Fue un patín muy bien recibido ( a la
gente le gustó).
 Fue usado por más de 100 años.
•William Brown puso las ruedas en ejes.
•Scott Olson inventó el patín en línea.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
14
Pre-Evaluación del 3er Trimestre
Guía de Respuestas de selección múltiple
Pregunta 1 ¿Qué significa la palabra inventor según se usa en La historia de los patines de
ruedas? Puedes usar un diccionario.
Pregunta 2 James sabía que el podía re-inventar un mejor patín de ruedas. ¿Qué muy
probablemente significa el prefijo re?
Pregunta 3 James Plimpton abrió la primera pista de patinaje sobre ruedas. ¿Qué palabra o
frase en la oración ayuda más al lectores a entender qué es una pista?
D
C
D
Pregunta 4 ¿Qué tipo de patines le gusta más a la gente hoy en día?
B
Pregunta 5 ¿En qué son diferentes los patines de James Plimpton y Sr. Petibled?
A
Pregunta 6 ¿Cómo el lector sabe que los patines de James Plimpton fueron muy bien
aceptados?
B
Pregunta 7 ¿Por qué James Plimpton quería inventar un nuevo tipo de patín de ruedas?
A
Pregunta 8 ¿Qué querían hacer todos los inventores?
C
Pregunta 9 ¿Qué lista muestra mejor cómo las ruedas en los patines de ruedas han cambiado
a lo largo de muchos años?
Pregunta 10 Selecciona la oración que tiene los mismos datos en ambos artículos.
B
D
Pregunta 11
Respuesta Construida
RI.2.8
Pregunta 12
Respuesta Construida
RI.2.9
Escribe y Revisa
Pregunta 13 ¿Qué oración no pertenece al párrafo?
C
Pregunta 14 ¿Qué palabra podría ser usada para remplazar la palabra abrió?
B
Pregunta 15 ¿Qué despedida tiene la coma en el lugar correcto?
A
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
15
Grad0
Pre-evaluación
3er trimestre
Lectura de texto informativo
Nombre___________________
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
16
Instrucciones para el estudiante:
Parte 1
Tu tarea:
Vas a leer dos pasajes sobre patines de ruedas.
1. Lee los dos artículos.
2. Relee los dos artículos. Toma notas mientras relees.
3. Contesta las preguntas.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
17
Grade Equivalence: 2.9
Lexile 500
La historia de los patines de ruedas
Artículo 1
Párrafo 1
Los primeros patines fueron hechos en 1760.
Fueron inventados por John Merlin.
Cada patín tenía dos ruedas muy pequeñas.
Figura 1: Los patines de John Merlin.
Párrafo 2
En 1819 se hizo la primera patente para un diseño de patín de ruedas.
Una patente se otorga a un inventor para que nadie pueda robar su
idea. Está escrita en papel. La patente le fue dada al Sr. Petibled. Sus
patines tenían tres ruedas. Las ruedas estaban hechas de madera o
metal, pero los patines que hizo eran difíciles de usar. Los patines no
podían girar.
Figura 2 El patín del Sr. Petibled.
Párrafo 3
James Plimpton fue un inventor también. Él también obtuvo una
patente para un nuevo diseño de patín de ruedas. En 1863 él hizo el
primer patín que tenía cuatro ruedas. Dos ruedas estaban en la parte
delantera y dos ruedas estaban en la parte de atrás. Sus patines eran
fáciles de usar. Por primera vez los patinadores podían hacer giros. A la
gente le gustó tanto sus patines que los utilizaron durante más de ¡100
años!
Figura 3 El patín de Plimpton.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
18
Historia de los patines de ruedas
Párrafo 4
En 1876 las ruedas de los patines se pusieron aún mejor. William
Brown puso las ruedas delanteras en un eje. Él puso las ruedas
traseras en otro eje. Las ruedas no estaban fijas como antes. Esto
hizo que los patines de ruedas fueran más rápidos y fáciles de usar.
Párrafo 5
En 1979 se inventó un nuevo tipo de patín. El inventor fue Scott
Olson. Los nuevos patines fueron llamados patines en línea. Al
principio, los patines estaban hechos con botas duras. Hoy están
hechos con botas suaves. A las personas les gusta más los patines en
línea que cualquier otro patín.
Figura 4 Patines en línea actuales.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
19
Grade Equivalence: 2.4
Lexile: 580
El padre del patinaje sobre ruedas
Artículo 2
Párrafo 1
James Plimpton nació en 1828. Él creció en una pequeña granja. Quería saber cómo
funcionaban las máquinas de la granja. Le encantaba ayudar a su padre a arreglar las
máquinas cuando se dañaban. James aprendió mucho acerca de las máquinas.
Cuando se hizo mayor, James trabajó en muchas tiendas de máquinas. Él aprendió
aún más sobre qué hace funcionar las máquinas. Cuando creció él tenía su propia
tienda.
Párrafo 2
Trabajó muy duro en su taller hasta que se enfermó. Su médico le dijo que saliera al
aire libre y patinara sobre hielo. En el invierno, James fue a patinar sobre hielo, pero
en el verano no había lugar para patinar sobre hielo. Él quería patinar en el verano
también. Sin embargo, los patines de ruedas para patinar en tierra eran difíciles de
usar. Ellos no se deslizaban como los patines de hielo lo hacían sobre el hielo.
Párrafo 3
Sabía que podía reinventar un mejor patín de ruedas. En 1863 James inventó el
primer patín de ruedas con cuatro ruedas. Los patines fueron también los primeros
que podían girar hacia la izquierda o a la derecha. Sus patines eran seguros y fáciles
de usar.
Párrafo 4
A James le gustaron mucho los nuevos patines. Él quería que todos los disfrutaran. El
abrió una tienda de patines. ¡El hacía 2,000 pares de patines de ruedas cada semana!
El abrió la primera pista de patinaje sobre ruedas. Él escribió un libro acerca de cómo
patinar. James hizo mucho para ayudar a la gente a que vieran que este era un
deporte divertido. James Plimpton es llamado el Padre del Patinaje sobre ruedas.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
20
Name ______________
1. ¿Qué significa la palabra inventor según se usa en La
historia de los patines de ruedas? Puedes usar un
diccionario.
A. A un inventor le gusta ver cómo funcionan las máquinas.
B. Un inventor es alguien que ayuda a otras personas.
C. Un inventor es un hombre.
D. Un inventor es alguien que crea algo nuevo.
Hacia RI.2.4
DOK 1 - Ce
Selecciona palabras o frases
adecuadas relacionadas a un
tema específico.
1
2. James sabía que el podía re-inventar un mejor patín de
ruedas. ¿Qué probablemente significa el prefijo re?
A.
hacer
B.
armar
C.
hacerlo otra vez
D.
empezar
Hacia RI.2.4
DOK 1 - APg
2.4b Determina el significado
de una nueva palabra
formada cuando se añade un
prefijo conocido a una palabra
conocida (ejemplo:feliz-infeliz
happy/unhappy)...
2
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
21
3. Lee la oración.
James Plimpton abrió la primera pista de
patinaje sobre ruedas.
¿Qué palabra o frase en la oración ayuda más al
lectores a entender qué es una pista?
A. James Plimpton
B. la primera
C. abrió
D. patinaje sobre ruedas
Hacia RI.2.4
DOK 2 – APn
Usa el contexto para
identificar y determinar el
significado de palabras o
frases.
L.2.4a Usan el contexto de
la oración (a su nivel) para
entender el significado de
una palabra o frase.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
3
22
4. ¿Qué tipo de patines le gusta más a la gente hoy
en día?
A.
los patines de James Plimpton
B.
patines en línea
C.
patines con dos ruedas
D.
los patines de Mr. Petibled’s
Hacia RI.2.8
DOK 1 - Cf
Puede contestar preguntas sobre
puntos específicos de un texto leído y
discutido en clase.
4
5. ¿En qué son diferentes los patines de James Plimpton
y Sr. Petibled?
A. Los patines de James Plimpton tenían cuatro ruedas y podían
girar, pero los patines del Sr. Petibled tenían tres ruedas y
eran difíciles de usar.
B. Los patines de James Plimpton tenían tres ruedas y podían
girar, pero los patines del Sr. Petibled eran difíciles de usar.
C. Los patines de James Plimpton y del Sr. Petibled eran
difíciles de usar, pero ambos tenían ruedas de madera, metal
o marfil.
D. Los patines de James Plimpton tenían dos ruedas y no
podían girar, pero los patines del Sr. Petibled eran fáciles de
usar.
Hacia RI.2.8 DOK 2 – Cl
Localizar razones para apoyar
puntos que el autor establece.
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
5
23
6. ¿Cómo el lector sabe que los patines de James
Plimpton fueron muy bien aceptados?
A. Sus patines eran seguros y fáciles de usar.
B. La gente los usó por más de 100 años.
C. Sus patines podían girar a la izquierda o a la derecha.
D. Sus patines eran mejores que los patines del Sr. Petibled.
Hacia RI.2. 8 DOK 3 – Cu
Contesta una pregunta que
requiere que el estudiante
conecte las razones puntos de
apoyo en un texto nuevo.
6
7. ¿Por qué James Plimpton quería inventar un nuevo
tipo de patín de ruedas?
A. Los patines de ruedas eran difícil de usar y no podían girar.
B. El quería patinar en tierra en el verano.
C. James Plimpton era un inventor.
D. El quería inventar un nuevo tipo de patín de ruedas.
Hacia RI.2. 9
DOK 1 - Cf
Puede contestar preguntas
sobre puntos específicos de
un texto leído y discutido en
clase.
7
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
24
8. ¿Qué querían hacer todos los inventores?
A. Los inventores querían patines con ruedas de metal.
B. Los inventores querían patines más rápidos.
C. Los inventores querían hacer mejores patines.
D. Los inventores querían tener patines con cuatro ruedas.
Hacia RI.2.9
DOK 2 - Ck
Identifica los puntos más
importantes en dos textos del
mismo tema.
8
9. ¿Qué lista muestra mejor cómo las ruedas en los
patines de ruedas han cambiado a lo largo de
muchos años?
1. Los patines son inventados en
1828.
2. Los patines son difíciles de
usar.
3. Los patines pueden girar a la
izquierda o a la derecha.
4. Los patines pueden ir más
rápido.
A
1. Los patines tienen dos ruedas de
metal pequeñas.
2. Los patines tienen tres ruedas
hechas de madera, metal o marfil.
3. Los patines tienen cuatro ruedas
que podían girar a la izquierda y a la
derecha.
4. Los patines tienen ruedas al frente y
atrás con sus propios ejes.
B
Hacia RI.2.9
DOK 3 - EVC
Categoriza o lista puntos
importantes de dos textos de
un mismo tema usando un
organizador gráfico. (el
maestro ha provisto las
categorías).
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
9
25
10. Lee cuidadosamente los datos sobre James Plimpton.
Datos sobre James Plimpton
El Padre del patinaje sobre ruedas
La historia de los patines de ruedas
Sus patines podían
girar a la izquierda o
a la derecha.
El hacía 2000 pares
de patines cada
semana.
El es llamado el Padre
del patinaje sobre
ruedas.
?
Sus patines fueron
muy bien
aceptados.
Sus patines tenían
dos ruedas al frente
y dos atrás.
El inventó los
patines en el 1863.
Selecciona la oración que tiene los mismos datos en
ambos artículos.
A. James Plimpton ayudó a la gente a ver que el patinaje era un
deporte divertido y escribió un libro sobre cómo patinar.
B. Los patines de ruedas de James Plimpton fueron los primaros
con cuatro ruedas y podían patinar en un círculo.
C. James Plimpton fue a patinar en el invierno y en el verano.
D. Los patines de ruedas de James Plimpton eran seguros y fáciles
de usar y fueron los primeros con cuatro ruedas.
Hacia RI.2.9 DOK 3 - EVC
Completa un diagrama Venn
para comparar y contrastar
puntos importantes en dos
textos del mismo tema.
10
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
26
11. Escribe una lista de puntos importantes para mostrar
cómo los patines han cambiado a lo largo de los años.
Usa ejemplos de ambos artículos.
RI.2.8, Objetivo de la Investigación 2
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
27
12. ¿En qué son iguales La historia de los patines de
ruedas y El padre del patinaje sobre ruedas?
¿En qué son diferentes? Usa ejemplos de ambos
artículos para completar el diagrama.
RI.2.9, Objetivo de la Investigación 3
Datos iguales
Datos de El padre del patinaje sobre ruedas
Datos de La historia de los patines de ruedas
___________________________
___________________________
______________________
_
__________________________
______________________
_________________________
____________________
_________________________
____________________
__________________________
____________________
___________________________
______________________
__________________________
______________________
______________________
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
28
13. Lee el párrafo a continuación.
(Escribe y RevisaW.2)
Tu puedes patinar sobre ruedas de muchas maneras. Tu puedes
girar y patinar en círculos. Los patines de ruedas vienen en muchos
colores. Hasta puedes patinar bien rápido.
¿Qué oración no pertenece al párrafo?
A. Tu puedes patinar sobre ruedas de muchas maneras.
B. Tu puedes girar y patinar en círculos.
C. Los patines de ruedas vienen en muchos colores.
D. Hasta puedes patinar bien rápido.
14. El abrió una tienda de patines de ruedas. (Escribe y Revisa L.2.4.a)
¿Qué palabra podría ser usada para remplazar la palabra
abrió?
A. cerró
B. empezó
C. terminó
D. tenía
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
29
15. ¿Qué despedida tiene la coma en el lugar correcto?
(Escribe y Revisa L.2.2b)
A. Tu amigo, Sam
B. Tu, amigo Sam
C. Tu amigo Sam,
D. Tu, amigo, Sam
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
30
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
31
Nombre _________________
Colorea de verde la cara alegre si tu respuesta estuvo correcta o de rojo si tu respuesta estuvo
incorrecta.
Estándar
RI.2.4
Determine the meaning of
words and phrases in a text
relevant to a grade 2 topic or
subject area.
Estándar
RI3.8
Describe cómo las razones
apoyan los puntos
específicos que el autor
hace un texto.
Estándar
DOK 1 - Ce
Yo puedo explicar lo que
una palabra o frase
significa.
L.2.4d
A veces uso un
diccionario o glosario.
DOK 1 - APg
2.4b Yo puedo usar prefijos
para deducir el significado de
una palabra.
2
1
DOK 1 - CL
Yo puedo encontrar razones
para explicar puntos que he
leído.
DOK 3 – CU
Yo puedo conectar razones
con puntos de apoyo en un
texto nuevo.
DOK 3 – EVC
Yo puedo citar la mejor
evidencia para explicar la
razón de un autor para
establecer un punto en
específico.
5
4
DOK 1 - Cf
Yo puedo contestar
preguntas sobre los puntos
Compara y contrasta los
puntos más importantes que más importante en un texto.
Yo puedo identificar los
puntos más importantes en
dos textos sobre el mismo
tema.
7
3
6
DOK 2 - ANp
DOK 2 - Ck
RI3.9
se presentan en dos textos
sobre el mismo tema.
DOK 2 – APn
L.2.4a Yo puedo usar
claves de otras
palabras en una
oración para ayudarme
a saber qué significa
una palabra.
Yo puedo identificar listas
con los puntos más
importantes de dos textos
sobre el mismo tema.
9
8
DOK 3 - ANy
Yo puedo seleccionar la
información correcta
necesaria para
completar un diagrama
Venn con puntos
importantes de dos
textos sobre el mismo
tema.
10
Colorea tu puntaje azul
Escribe y Revisa
Las preguntas de escribe y
revisa son componentes de
preparación para las
respuestas construidas.
L.2.4a
W.2
Lee el párrafo.
¿Qué oración no
pertenece al
párrafo?
13
¿Qué palabra
podría ser
usada para
remplazar
abrió?
14
L.2.2b
¿Qué
despedida
tiene la coma
en el lugar
correcto?
15
0
1
2
3
Escribe una lista de puntos
importantes para mostrar cómo los
patines han cambiado a lo largo de
los años. Usa ejemplos de ambos
artículos.
11
0
1
2
3
¿En qué son iguales La
historia de los patines de
ruedas y El padre del patinaje
sobre ruedas? ¿En qué son
diferentes? Usa ejemplos de
ambos artículos para completar
el diagrama.
12
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
32
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Rev. Control: 01/01/2014 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
33
Descargar

sresource.homestead.com