Dublin, 11/11/14
SOCIAL PEDAGOGY
developing authentic relationships
Unity through Relationship Conference
Gabriel Eichsteller
[email protected]
ThemPra Social Pedagogy
Community Interest Company
The Social Pedagogy Diamond
Eichsteller & Holthoff, 2009
In a Nutshell
Essentially Social Pedagogy is about
helping children unfold their potential
The Purpose of Social Pedagogy
creating learning situations …
values
purpose
motivation
confidence
… in the everyday
The Hundred Languages of the Child
The child
is made of one hundred.
The child has
a hundred languages
a hundred hands
a hundred thoughts
a hundred ways of thinking
of playing, of speaking.
A hundred always a hundred
ways of listening
of marveling, of loving
a hundred joys
for singing and understanding
a hundred worlds
to discover
a hundred worlds
to invent
a hundred worlds
to dream.
Loris Malaguzzi, founder of Reggio Emilia (translated by Lella Gandini)
Haltung
“The true measure of a man is how he treats someone
who can do him absolutely no good.”
Samuel Johnson, English essayist & poet
The 3 Ps
3 P model:
Professional self
Personal self
Private self
Basis:
Professional
Competence
Objectivity
Subjectivity
Emotional
Knowledge and
insights:
Theoretical
Knowledge e.g.
Laws & policies
Processed
experiences
Self -awareness
Own experiences
(more or less
proccesed)
Actions
characterized by:
Analysis
Methods
Evaluation
Have a sense of
situation
Empathy
Emotive
Chance
Approach to
collaboration:
Multi-disciplinary
Willingness and
eagerness to cooperate
Pursuing one’s own
agenda
Needs:
Others
Others /own
Own
Children as Equals
“Children don’t become human beings, they already are.
Children are not the people of tomorrow, but are people of today.”
Janusz Korczak, Polish pedagogue and writer
The Art of Helping
“If one is truly to succeed in leading a person to a specific place, one must first
and foremost take care to find him where he is and begin there.
This is the secret in the entire art of helping. Anyone who cannot do this is
himself under a delusion if he thinks he is able to help someone else.
In order truly to help someone else, I must understand more than he—but
certainly first and foremost understand what he understands. If I do not, then
my greater understanding does not help him at all.
If I still intend to assert my greater understanding, then it is because I am vain or
proud, and instead of benefiting him, I actually want to be admired by him.
But all true helping begins with a humbling:
The helper must first humble himself under the person he wants to help and
thereby understand that to help is not to dominate but to serve, that to help is
not to be the most dominating but the most patient, that to help is a
willingness to, for the time being, put up with being in the wrong and not
understanding what the other understands.”
Søren Kierkegaard, Danish social philosopher, in ”A straightforward message”
(1859)
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