Quarter Four
2014-15
CFA
Reading: Literature
Targets
Standards
DOK
3
Reasoning and Evidence
RL.3
1-2
6
Reasoning and Evidence
RL.6
2
5
Analysis Within and Across Texts
RL.9
4
Reading: Informational
Targets
Standards
DOK
10
Reasoning and Evidence
RI.3
1-2
11
Reasoning and Evidence
RI.6
3
12
Analysis Within and Across Texts
RI.9
4
Note: There may be more standards per target. Only standards assessed are listed.
Opinion Writing and Language
Targets
Standards
DOK
1a
Brief Opinion Write
W.1a,W.1b, W.1c, W.1d
3
1b
Write-Revise Opinion
W.1a,W.1b, W.1c, W.1d
2
2
Full Opinion Composition
W-1a, W-1b, W-1c, W-1d, W-4,
W-5, W-8
4
8
Language-Vocabulary Use
L.3a
1-2
9
Edit and Clarify
L.3.2e
1-2
Quarter Four English Language Arts Common Formative Assessments
2014-2015
Team Members and Writers
This assessment was developed working backwards by identifying the deep understanding of the two passages.
Key Ideas were identified to support constructed responses and key details were aligned with the selected
response questions. All questions support students’ background knowledge of a central insight or message.
Deborah Alvarado
Patty Gallardo
Sandra Maines
Jennifer Robbins
Aliceson Brandt
Dori George
Gina McClain
Kelly Rooke
Linda Benson
Heather Giard
Christina Orozco
Hailey Christenson
Sonja Grabel
Teresa Portinga
Tammy Cole
Dovina Greco
Judy Ramer
Translator: Zaida Rosa
Translator: Patricia Ramirez
Thank you to all of those who reviewed and edited and a special appreciation to Vicki
Daniels and her amazing editing skills and our “in-house” writer Ginger Jay.
Rev. Control: 04/20/2015 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
2
This is a CFA to measure the task of writing an opinion piece. Full compositions are always part of a
Performance Task. A complete performance task would have:
Part 1
• A Classroom Activity (30 Minutes)
Activity should include
1. New language and vocabulary students may encounter in passages (taught through a source that does not
pre-teach the actual passages). Vocabulary that may be new to students in the passages in this assessment
may include: alarm, tornado, earthquake, curling, “scaredy cat,” California, cousins, Florida, hurricanes,
Red Cross, Oklahoma, basement, recorded, debris, gas tank, survived, court house, hotel, lullaby, comfort,
disaster, explored, shy, nurse, one-room schoolhouse, college, soldiers, war department, colonel, battlefield,
President Lincoln, Europe, Washington, D.C., and achievement.
2. Classroom Activity: approximately 30 minutes Pass out paper and have each students make a T-
chart about the American Red Cross Then and Now. Have students share out and make a class Tchart. An 8 minute video about the creation of the American Red Cross
www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4sAIU1hQOk
A 1 minute song, The American Red Cross
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0b83hXXTmk&list=PLFA9FBB78EE772196
3. (35 minutes – Independent work)
• Passages or stimuli to Read
• 3 Research Questions
• There may be other constructed response questions.
Part 2
• A Full-Composition (70 Minutes)
Students should have access to spell-check resources but no grammar-check resources. Students can refer back to
their passages, notes and 3 research questions and any other constructed responses, as often they’d like. The notetaking forms in this pre-assessment were created for informational text. If you choose to use these, please have your
students take notes while reading the informational passages.
Directions
30 minutes
1. You may wish to have a 30 minute classroom activity. The purpose of a PT activity is to ensure that all students
are familiar with the concepts of the topic and know and understand key terms (vocabulary) that are at the
upper end of their grade level (words they would not normally know or are unfamiliar to their background or
culture).The classroom activity DOES NOT pre-teach any of the specific content that will be assessed!
35 minutes
2. Students read the passages independently. If you have students who can not read the passages you may read
them to those students but please make note of the accommodation. Remind students to take notes as they
read. During an actual SBAC assessment students are allowed to keep their notes as a reference.
3. Students answer the 3 research questions or other constructed response questions. Students should also refer
to their answers when writing their full opinion piece.
15 minute break
70 Minutes
4. Students write their full composition (opinion piece).
SCORING
An opinion Rubric is provided. Students receive three scores:
1.
2.
3.
Organization and Purpose
Evidence and Elaboration
Conventions
Rev. Control: 04/20/2015 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
3
Order at HSD Print Shop…
http://www.hsd.k12.or.us/Departments/PrintShop/
WebSubmissionForms.aspx
Directions
The HSD Elementary assessments are neither scripted nor timed assessments. They are a tool to inform
instructional decision making. It is not the intent of these assessments to have students “guess and check” answers
for the sake of finishing an assessment.
All students should “move toward” taking the assessments independently but many will need scaffolding strategies.
If students are not reading at grade level and can’t read the text, please read the stories to the students and ask the
questions. Allow students to read the parts of the text that they can. Please note the level of differentiation a
student needed.
About this Assessment
This assessment includes: Selected-Response, Constructed-Response, and a Performance Task.
Types of SBAC Constructed Response Rubrics in this Assessment
http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=774846
Reading
• 2 Point Short Response
• 2-3 Point Extended
Response
Writing
• 4 Point Full Composition Rubric (Performance
Task)
• 2-3 Point Brief Write (1-2 Paragraphs) Rubric
• 2-3 Point Write to Revise Rubrics as Needed
Research
• 2 Point Rubrics Measuring
Research Skill Use
Quarter 4 Performance Task
The underlined sections are those scored on SBAC.
Please take 2 days to complete performance tasks.
Part 1
•
•
•
•
Part 2
Classroom Activity if Desired/Needed
Read two paired passages.
Take notes while reading (note-taking).
Answer SR and CR research questions about sources
Components of Part 1
Note-Taking:
Students take notes as they read passages to gather information
about their sources. Students are allowed to use their notes to later
write a full composition (essay). Note-taking strategies should be
taught as structured lessons throughout the school year in grades
K – 6. A teacher’s note-taking form with directions and a notetaking form for your students to use for this assessment is
provided, or you may use whatever formats you’ve had past
success with. Please have students practice using the note-taking
page in this document before the actual assessment if you choose
to use it.
Research:
In Part 1 of a performance task students answer constructed
response questions written to measure a student’s ability to use
research skills needed to complete a performance task. These CR
questions are scored using the SBAC Research Rubrics rather than
reading response rubrics.
•
•
•
•
Class Activity
Plan your essay (brainstorming -pre-writing).
Write, Revise and Edit (W.5)
Writing a Full Composition or Speech
Components of Part 2
Planning
Students review notes and sources and plan their
composition.
Write, Revise and Edit
Students draft, write, revise and edit their writing.
Word processing tools should be available for spell
check (but no grammar check).
This protocol focuses on the key elements of writing
opinion pieces:
1. Statement of Purpose/Focus: Do you clearly state your
opinion? Do you stay on topic?
2. Organization: Do your ideas flow logically from the
introduction to conclusion? Do you use effective
transitions?
3. Elaboration of Evidence: Do you provide evidence from
sources about your opinions and elaborate with specific
information?
4. Language and Vocabulary: Do you express your ideas
effectively? Do you use precise language that is
appropriate for your audience and purpose?
5. Conventions: Do you use punctuation, capitalization and
spelling correctly?
There are NO Technology-enhanced Items/Tasks (TE) Note: It is highly recommended that students have experiences with the
following types of tasks from various on-line instructional practice sites, as they are not on the HSD Elementary Assessments:
reordering text, selecting and changing text, selecting text, and selecting from drop-down menu
Rev. Control: 04/20/2015 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
Grade 3
S
R Eread
E
SOMETHING
NEW
A
EXPLAIN
MORE
Key Idea
Write one new key idea about the main idea
AGAIN and
AGAIN
R
RELEVANT
OR NOT?
C
CONCLUDE
H
HAVE
EVIDENCE
Instruct students to re-read a paragraph or
section of the text they liked or you’ve chosen.
Ask, “Does the section or paragraph state
something new about the main idea?”
____________________________________________________________________________
This is a key idea about the main idea (be sure
students know what the main idea is).
____________________________________________________________________________
Have students write ONE brief sentence about
the new key idea .
Key Details
1
Explain more about the new key idea. Write two key details from the section or paragraph that
support the key idea.
Ask students to look for key details that explain more about
• Key Detail __________________________________________________________________
the new key idea.
Key details are reasons that support a key idea. Instruct
__________________________________________________________________________
Remember
students
students to write 2 brief key details that support the key
idea.
will need to have a
Example: If the main idea is about dogs and..
• Key Detail _________________________________________________________________
2
note-taking
form for
“The dog likes to play,” (is the key Idea),
each_________________________________________________________________________
passage.
Then some key details might be:
• the dog likes to play fetch.
• the dog likes to play with the ball.
Again and Again
What words or phrases does the author use again and again? Write them here. Think about why
the author
them or
again and again.
Have
students keeps
re-read using
the paragraph
section they wrote about and write words or
ideas they see Again and Again, in the box.
3
Explain, “When authors use the same words,
phrases or ideas Again and Again ask yourself
“why?”. It means something is important.”
Instruct students to look at the again and again words
or phrases, ask “Do you see some of the again and
again words or ideas in the key ideas or key details
sentences you wrote? Can the words help you write
one conclusion sentence that tell the most about the
key idea you chose?”
4
Summarizing is a big part of writing conclusions. It is
an extremely important strategy for students to learn
in order to use research skills effectively.
Write one conclusion
sentence that tells the most about the new key idea and key details.
Differentiation:
Students
who
need
more words
pages – print
as many
Use some of the again and
again
if you
can.as needed. Students who would benefit from enrichment can continue on
with more sections or paragraphs. Students who need more direct instruction – teach each part as a
____________________________________________________________________________
mini lesson. These concepts can be taught separately:
• Main Topic
• Key Idea
_____________________________________________________________________________
• Key Details
• Again and Again
• Conclusions - Summarizing
ELL Students may need each part taught using language (sentence) frames emphasizing transitional words.
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5
Grade 3
R Eread
S
E
SOMETHING NEW
EXPLAIN MORE
A
AGAIN and
AGAIN
R
RELEVANT OR
NOT?
C
CONCLUDE
H
HAVE
EVIDENCE
Name_________________ Passage_______________ Main Idea ____________
Key Idea
Write one new key idea about the main idea
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Key Details
Explain more about the new key idea. Write two key details from the paragraph or section that
support the new key idea.
• Key Detail
_________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
• Key Detail
_________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________
Again and Again
What words or phrases does the author use again and again? Write them here.
Think about why the author keeps using them again and again.
Write one conclusion sentence that tells the most about the new key idea and key details.
Use some of the again and again words if you can.
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Rev. Control: 04/20/2015 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
6
Listening
& reading
Productive
modalities*: Ways in
which students communicate
to others (e.g., speaking,
writing, and drawing).
Instruction and assessment of
productive modalities focus on
students’ communication of
their own understanding or
Speaking
&
Writing
interpretation.
Interactive modalities*: Collaborative
use of receptive and productive
modalities as “students engage in
conversations, provide and obtain
information, express feelings and
emotions, and exchange opinions”
(Phillips, 2008, p. 3).
Standard
An ELL
can…
Listening,
speaking,
reading,
and
writing
Productive
(S & W)
1
construct meaning from oral presentations and literary and
informational text through grade-appropriate listening, reading, and
viewing
8
determine the meaning of words and phrases in oral presentations
and literary and informational text
3
speak and write about grade-appropriate
complex literary and informational texts and
topics
4
construct grade-appropriate oral
and written claims and support
them with reasoning and evidence
7
adapt language choices to purpose, task, and
audience when speaking and writing
2
participate in grade-appropriate oral and written exchanges of
information, ideas, and analyses, responding to peer, audience, or
reader comments and questions
5
conduct research and evaluate and communicate findings to answer
questions or solve problems
6
analyze and critique the arguments of others orally and in writing
By the end of an English language proficiency level, an ELL in
2nd – 3rd Grade can . . .
1
4
10 - make accurate use of standard English to communicate in grade-appropriate
speech and writing
Receptive modalities*:
Ways in which students receive
communications from others (e.g.,
listening, reading, viewing). Instruction
and assessment of receptive modalities
focus on students’ communication of
their understanding of the meaning of
communications from others.
9 - create clear and coherent grade-appropriate speech and text
ELP 2nd – 3rd Grade Band Standards Organized by Modality
…construct grade…express an
appropriate oral
opinion about a
and written claims
familiar topic.
and support them
with reasoning
and evidence.
2
3
4
…express an
opinion
about a
familiar topic
or story.
…express an opinion
about a familiar
topic or story, giving
one or more reasons
for the opinion.
…express opinions
about a variety of
topics, introducing the
topic & giving several
reasons for the opinion.
5
…express opinions about a
variety of topics, introducing
the topic, giving several
reasons for the opinion, &
providing a concluding
statement.
This performance task is based on writing. As an option if you’d like to monitor growth for ELP as a second goal, teachers can choose to
assess ELP standard 4 because it aligns with this specific performance task. Your student’s full composition can be analyzed to identify
English language proficiency levels. It is evident that students will be navigating through the modalities to get to the end product.
However, it is important to keep in mind what the full opinion writing performance task is assessing and how deeply the student
understands class content and language. The ELP growth goal is to provide the “just-right scaffolds” for students to demonstrate their
understanding in order for them to move from one proficiency level to the next.
Oregon ELP Standards Aligned with Performance Task, 2014; Arcema Tovar
Opinion Writing CFA
Student and Class Scoring:
Scoring Key:
Total # Correct
1 = Emerging
0-4
2 = Developing
3 = Proficient
4 = Exemplary
5-7
8 - 10
School Year:
2014-15
Grade:
Teachers Name:
School:
11 - 12
Focus and
Organization
Student Name:
Score
Elaboration and
Conventions
Evidence
Score
Student
Total
Score
1.
2.
3.
4.
5
0
6
0
7
0
8
0
9
0
10
0
11
0
12
0
13
0
14
0
15
0
16
0
17
0
18
0
19
0
20
0
21
0
22
0
23
0
24
0
25
0
26
0
27
0
28
0
29
0
30
0
31
0
32
0
33
0
34
0
35
4 Total Students
0
To use the Excel Version of this Score sheet.
http://sresource.homestead.com/index.html
% Proficient
% Exemplary
25%
75%
25%
75%
25%
50%
50%
50%
ELP
Score
Grades 3 - 5: Generic 4-Point Opinion Writing Rubric
Score
Statement of Purpose/Focus and
Organization
Statement of
Purpose/Focus
The response is
fully sustained and
consistently and
purposefully
focused:
4
Exemplary
• opinion is clearly
stated, focused,
and strongly
maintained
• opinion is
communicated
clearly within the
context
The response is
adequately
sustained and
generally focused:
3
Proficient
2
Developing
1
Merging
0
• opinion is clear
and for the most
part maintained,
though some
loosely related
material may be
present
• context provided
for the claim is
adequate
The response is
somewhat
sustained with
some extraneous
material or a
minor drift in
focus:
• may be clearly
focused on the
opinion but is
insufficiently
sustained
• opinion on the
issue may be
unclear and
unfocused
The response may
be related to the
purpose but may
offer little or no
focus:
• may be very brief
• may have a major
drift
• opinion may be
confusing or
ambiguous
Organization
Development: Language and Elaboration of
Evidence
Elaboration of
Evidence
The response has a clear and
effective organizational
structure creating unity and
completeness:
The response provides
thorough and convincing
support/evidence for the
writer’s opinion that
• effective, consistent use of a
includes the effective use
variety of transitional strategies of sources, facts, and
• logical progression of ideas
details:
from beginning to end
• effective introduction and
conclusion for audience and
purpose
• use of evidence from
sources is smoothly
integrated,
comprehensive, and
relevant
• effective use of a variety
of elaborative techniques
The response has an
recognizable organizational
structure, though there may
be minor flaws and some ideas
may be loosely connected:
The response provides
adequate
support/evidence for the
writer’s opinion that
includes the use of
sources, facts, and details:
• adequate use of transitional
strategies with some variety
• adequate progression of ideas
from beginning to end
• adequate introduction and
conclusion
The response has an
inconsistent organizational
structure, and flaws are
evident:
• inconsistent use of transitional
strategies with little variety
• uneven progression of ideas
from beginning to end
• conclusion and introduction, if
present, are weak
The response has little or no
discernible organizational
structure:
• some evidence from
sources is integrated,
though citations may be
general or imprecise
• adequate use of some
elaborative techniques
The response provides
uneven, cursory
support/evidence for the
writer’s opinion that
includes partial or uneven
use of sources, facts, and
details:
• evidence from sources is
weakly integrated, and
citations, if present, are
uneven
• weak or uneven use of
elaborative techniques
The response provides
minimal support/evidence
for the writer’s opinion
• few or no transitional strategies that includes little or no
are evident
use of sources, facts, and
• frequent extraneous ideas may details:
intrude
Language and
Vocabulary
Conventions
The response clearly
and effectively
expresses ideas, using
precise language:
• use of academic and
domain-specific
vocabulary is clearly
appropriate for the
audience and
purpose
The response
demonstrates a strong
command of
conventions:
The response
adequately expresses
ideas, employing a mix
of precise with more
general language:
The response
demonstrates an
adequate command of
conventions:
• use of domain-specific
vocabulary is generally
appropriate for the
audience and purpose
• few, if any, errors in
usage and sentence
formation e
• effective and
consistent use of
punctuation,
capitalization, and
spelling
• some errors in usage
and sentence
formation are present,
but no systematic
pattern of errors is
displayed
• adequate use of
punctuation,
capitalization, and
spelling
The response
expresses ideas
unevenly, using
simplistic language:
The response
expresses ideas
unevenly, using
simplistic language:
• use of domain-specific
vocabulary that may at
times be inappropriate
for the audience and
purpose
• use of domain-specific
vocabulary that may at
times be inappropriate
for the audience and
purpose
The response
expression of ideas is
vague, lacks clarity, or
is confusing:
The response
demonstrates a lack of
command of
conventions:
• uses limited language
• errors are frequent
or domain-specific
and severe and
vocabulary
meaning is often
• use of evidence from
obscured
sources is minimal, absent, • may have little sense of
audience and purpose
in error, or irrelevant
A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to [fill in with key language from the intended target].
Working Drafts of ELA rubrics for assessing CCSS writing standards --- © (2010) Karin Hess, National Center for Assessment [[email protected]
Rev. Control: 04/20/2015 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
9
Quarter 4 CFA Research Constructed Response Answer Key
Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 3
Evidence of the ability to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information such as fact from opinion.
Question #7 RL.3.6 Prompt: Explain why the author probably wrote The Tornado Drill.
Teacher /Rubric “Language Response”
The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to distinguish relevant from irrelevant information such as fact
from opinion in explaining why the author probably wrote The Tornado Drill.
Sufficient student responses could include: (1) what to do in case of a tornado at school, (2) the steps to a tornado
drill, and (3) alarms mean different things in different areas of the country.
Student “Language” Response Example
The student states a reason the author wrote the article and then supports it with two sufficient, relevant,
informational examples.
2
The author wrote this story to explain what a student should do during a tornado drill. First they
should go into the hall with their class and sit next to each other. Then they should curl into a ball
and put their hands over their neck. This will protect them from anything that is falling. These
things will protect you if there is a tornado when you are at school. That is why the author wrote
this article.
The student infers the author’s purpose but it is not clearly stated.
1
0
Student response: This story is about Jonas and Molly who are scared of storms. They have to get
ready for a tornado.
The student does not give enough information.
Student response: Tornadoes are the scariest storms.
Standard RL.3.6
Distinguish their own point of view from that of
the narrator or those of the characters
Rev. Control: 04/20/2015 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
10
Quarter 4 CFA Constructed Response Answer Key
Standard RL.3.9
3 Point Reading Constructed Response Rubric
Question #8 (prompt) Explain the similarities and differences between tornado and
earthquake drills. Give examples from the story.
Directions for Scoring: Write an overview of what students could include in a proficient response with examples from the text. Be
very specific and “lengthy.”
Sufficient Evidence: Students are able to identify the similarities and differences between tornado and earthquake drills from
details and examples in the story.
Specific Identifications (supporting details): Students are able to identify key details or examples from the story differentiating
similarities and differences between tornado and earthquake drills. Students could include for similarities that (1) alarms can be
heard in both drills, (2) they are unexpected. Students could include for differences that (1) during a tornado drill students go in
the hall but during an earthquake drill students hide under their desks, (2) during a tornado drill students curl up in a ball and put
your hands over your neck but not during an earthquake drill, and (3) tornado drill protect you from being hit by objects but
earthquake drills protect you from shaking buildings.
Full Support (other details): Students are able to identify key details in the passage that support their response. This could be a
detailed explanation with text evidence of similarities and differences between tornado and earthquake drills (such as both are
scary, etc…).
The student states similarities and differences with sufficient, relevant examples. Student uses details from the text.
3
There are many things that are the same and different about earthquakes and tornadoes. They are the
same because for both you would hear an alarm. You would never know when they were going to
happen. I can imagine they are both very scary too! They are different because in an earthquake drill
you hide under your desk. This is probably to protect you from shaking buildings and falling ceilings. But
In a tornado drill you go into the hall, curl up into a ball, and put your hands over your neck. This protects
you from being hit by objects. That is how and earthquake drills are the same and different.
The student states some similarities and differences with relevant examples. Student uses details from the text.
2
They are the same because for both you would hear an alarm and both are scary. They are
different because in an earthquake drill you hide under your desk. In a tornado drill you go into
the hall but in an earthquake drill you hide under your desk.
1
The student gives limited examples but does not explain.
0
The student does not give enough information or it is irrelevant.
Both earthquakes and tornadoes are scary. They are a kind of storm.
There are things that are the same and different about earthquakes and tornadoes.
Standard RL.3.9
Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and
plots of stories written by the same author about
the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from
a series)
11
Rev. Control: 04/20/2015 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
Quarter 4 CFA Research Constructed Response Answer Key
Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 2
Locate, Select, Interpret and Integrate Information
Question #15 RI.3.6 Prompt: Explain why the author probably wrote “Red Cross Story: A
Tornado, A Boy, and a Frog.” Use details from the text to explain your answer.
Teacher /Rubric “Language Response”
The response: gives sufficient evidence of the ability to locate and select information about the prompt.
Students must locate and then select the information from Red Cross Story…
The response: gives sufficient evidence of the ability to interpret and integrate information about the
prompt. Students interpret information when they locate relevant support and integrate information when
They write a completed response. Student responses that indicate this ability could include: (1) reasons the
author was grateful to the Red Cross and (2) to tell others why the author will always give to the Red Cross.
The reasons are all acceptable if they are found in the text.
Student “Language” Response Example
The student states a reason the author wrote the article and then supports it with 2 sufficient relevant information
examples from the article, using many details and facts.
2
1
0
The author wrote this story to explain how grateful she was for the help of the Red Cross. The author’s
house was hit directly by an F5 tornado. The tornado ripped away the house and caused a lot of damage
like crushing cement and bricks, and ripping a gas tank loose. The family had nowhere to live and the Red
Cross helped them. They got food and clothing from the Red Cross. The little boy was very scared and he
got a stuffed toy that helped him and the rest of his family feel better. The Red Cross was so helpful that
the author will give to the organization to help others when she can.
The student infers the author’s purpose, but is not clearly stated. The student gives 1-2 examples, but with limited
details or facts.
The story was about how the Red Cross helps. The author tells you how the Red Cross helped her family.
The Red Cross gave the boy a toy frog and other stuff.
The student does not give enough relevant information to answer the prompt.
The Red Cross is helpful.
Standard RI.3.6
Distinguish their own point of view from
that of the author of a text.
Rev. Control: 04/20/2015 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond
12
Quarter 4 CFA Research Constructed Response
Constructed Response Research Rubrics Target 4
Ability to cite evidence to support opinions and ideas
Question #16 RI.3.9 Prompt: Explain what you learned about the American Red
Cross using examples and details from both texts, then summarize how both texts
are the same and different.
Teacher /Rubric “Language Response”
The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to cite evidence to support opinions or ideas about the
American Red Cross, drawing information from both texts. From Text 1 evidence to support ideas about the
American Red Cross could include: (1) the Red Cross was started in America after Clara Barton saw the Red Cross in
Europe, (2) the Red Cross helps people when there is a fire or flood, (3) in 1881 people sent money to the Red Cross
to help fight fires in Michigan and (4) it opened its first building in Washington D.C. in 1893. From Text 2 evidence to
support ideas about the American Red Cross could include: (1) the Red Cross provided food and clothing to a family
after a tornado destroyed their home, (2) it had a “store” set up for people to get things needed and (3) it helped
the author’s son find comfort from a stuffed toy called Mr. Frog. Students should have a summary statement
explaining how both texts are the same (they both share how the Red Cross helps people) and how they are
different ( one is about Clara Barton and one is about a family’s experience that needed help).
Student “Language” Response Example
Student gives sufficient examples and details and then summarizes how they are the same and different.
2
1
0
I learned from Text 1 that Clara Barton started the Red Cross after she saw it in Europe. The Red Cross
helps people when there is a disaster like floods and fires. The first time the Red Cross helped others was
in 1881 when a fire started in Michigan. The Red Cross opened its first building in 1893 in Washington D.C.
In Text 2 I learned that the American Red Cross helps people who have been hit by tornadoes and supplies
them with clothes, food and whatever they need, even toys for kids. The “Red Cross Story” is about how a
family was helped during an emergency, while “Clara Barton” was about how the American Red Cross
began. But both texts tell about how the American Red Cross helps people all over the country.
Student gives some examples and details and then summarizes how they are the same and different.
In the first text I learned that the American Red Cross began in American because of Clara Barton. She made sure the
Red Cross helped people when there was a big fire in Michigan. In the second text I learned that the Red Cross even
helps when there are tornadoes. Both texts are about the American Red Cross helping people. One is a story about a
family. The other one is about Clara Barton.
The student does not support the prompt.
The American Red Cross is in America.
Standard RL.3.9
Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and
plots of stories written by the same author about
the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from
a series)
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Note: “Brief Writes” should take no longer than 10 minutes. Brief writes are scored with a 2-3 point rubric. Full compositions
are scored with a 4 point rubric. The difference between this rubric and the constructed response reading rubrics, is that the
Brief Write Rubric is assessing writing proficiency in a specific area, while the reading rubrics are assessing comprehension.
Quarter 4 CFA Brief Write Constructed Response Answer Key
W.3.1c Target 6a
Write a Brief Text, W.3.1c, connect opinion to reason with linking words, Writing Target 6a
17. A student is writing an opinion speech for her class about the American
Red Cross. Read the draft of his opinion piece and complete the task that
follows.
Write a Brief Text, W.3.1c, connect opinion to reason with linking words, Writing Target 6a
Red Cross Facts
The American Red
Cross opened a building
in Washington, D.C. in
1893.
The Red Cross assists
in all and any disasters.
The Red Cross began in
Europe.
People have been
depending on the Red
Cross since 1881.
•
•
•
•
Why the Red Cross is Important to America
Paragraph 1
The American Red Cross founder was Clara Barton. She began
helping soldiers during the Civil War. Since then her legacy lives on.
Paragraph 2
There are facts about the American Red Cross that can help all of us
understanding its importance.
Paragraph 3
I’m thankful that we can always depend on the Red Cross!
Using information from the chart, and in your own words, add one or more
sentences to paragraph two that give more details to support and help
convince others of the student’s opinion.
Teacher /Rubric “Language Response”
Directions for Scoring: Write an overview of what students could include in a proficient response with examples from the text.
Be very specific and “lengthy.” Teacher Language and Scoring Notes:
The student response should support the opinion given, provide information from the texts and the chart Red Cross Facts, and
transition easily from paragraph to paragraph.
Student “Language” Response Example
2
1
0
Student response sufficiently supports the opinion, provides information and facts from the texts to extend paragraph
2 and transitions logically between paragraphs.
In 1881 Michigan had many forest fires and people sent money to the American Red Cross for the first time
to help fight the fires. Since then the Red Cross is always there for those needing help. When tornados or
hurricanes leave people without homes the Red Cross supplies food, clothing and even shelter.
Student response partially supports the opinion, provides partial or limited information and facts from the text to
extend paragraph 2 and partially transitions logically between paragraphs.
I think its important at least. We do need the Red Cross to help with food and other things we need unless
we have family that can help. That would also be great. Don’t you think?
Student response does not specifically support the opinion or provide information from the texts.
Once when there was a hurricane outside my town we all got ready. Some of us had sandbags by the
doors but mostly we nailed up the house and left town.
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W.3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.
W.3.1.a Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.
W.3.1.b Provide reasons that support the opinion.
W.3.1.c Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons.
W.3.1.d Provide a concluding statement or section.
Opinion Full Composition Performance Task Score “4” Example SBAC Rubric Grades 3 - 5
score
4
Exemplary
Student
score
explained
Statement of Purpose/Focus and
Organization
Statement of
Purpose/Focus
Organization
The response is fully
sustained and
consistently and
purposefully
focused:
The response has a clear
and effective
organizational structure
creating unity and
completeness:
• opinion is clearly
stated, focused,
and strongly
maintained
• opinion is
communicated
clearly within the
context
• effective, consistent use
of a variety of
transitional strategies
• logical progression of
ideas from beginning to
end
• effective introduction
and conclusion for
audience and purpose
The student
response is
sustained
throughout and
focused on the
prompt continually
supporting a
specifically stated
opinion.
The response has a clear
organizational structure
of examples and reasons
supporting an opinion.
The student uses
transitional language to
help the writing flow
from the introduction to
the conclusion.
Development: Language and Elaboration
of Evidence
Conventions
Elaboration of
Evidence
Language and
Vocabulary
The response provides
thorough and convincing
support/evidence for the
writer’s opinion that
includes the effective use
of sources, facts, and
details:
The response clearly and
effectively expresses
ideas, using precise
language:
• use of academic and
domain-specific
vocabulary is clearly
appropriate for the
audience and purpose
The response
demonstrates a strong
command of
conventions:
The student uses domain
and text- specific
vocabulary to make
specific points
( Red Cross, Clara Barton,
Civil War, disasters,
tornado, earthquake). The
writing is appropriate for
the audience ( a class).
The student has few, if
any, errors in usage and
sentence formation.
There are a variety of
sentence types.
Punctuation,
capitalization and
spelling is accurate.
• use of evidence from
sources is smoothly
integrated,
comprehensive, and
relevant
• effective use of a variety of
elaborative techniques
There is evidence within
each section of the
response that supports why
the writer wants to work for
the Red Cross. The
information is relevant to
the opinion. The student
uses elaboration techniques
– such as persuasion, with a
variety of description.
• few, if any, errors in
usage and sentence
formation e
• effective and consistent
use of punctuation,
capitalization, and
spelling
Example Performance Task
You have been asked to write an opinion piece about why you someday want to work for the American Red Cross for a class report.
There are many reasons why I would like to someday work for the Red Cross.
The writer states a definite opinion.
First, you help people that really need help. The Red Cross is always there to help when disasters happen. Just imagine what it
would be like without them. And, if you worked for the Red Cross you could be one of the first people to help others after a
tornado, a flood or any disaster.
The writer stays on topic throughout using transitional language First, Next, etc..
Secondly I want to work for the American Red Cross because it would be like being Clara Barton. She is kind of my hero. She started
the Red Cross. She loved to help others and nurse those who were ill, even soldiers during the Civil War. Those are things I love to
do too. There are many other examples too as to why I would love that job.
The writer expresses ideas, using precise language from the passages to elaborate ideas.
One example of how the American Red Cross once helped someone was in 1999. A tornado struck Oklahoma. It was very strong.
One family was hit hard and their entire house was ripped away. They had to climb their way out of the basement through lumber,
nails and glass. They had a two year old son who was so scared and quiet. The Red Cross helped the family and the little boy found
a stuffed frog from the Red Cross store that sang a lullaby.
So, when tornado or earthquake drills happen in schools it’s for a good reason. Practicing to be ready for disasters is part of Red
Cross’s job too. We all need to be ready!
The writer concludes the opinion piece.
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Grade 3 - Quarter 4 CFA Selected Response Answer Key
Question 1 Why did Jonas go into the hall? RL.3
A
Question 2 Why did Molly hide under her desk? RL.3
C
Question 3 In The Tornado Drill, how does the author help readers? RL.3.6
A
Question 4 Why did the author probably write The Tornado Drill? RL.3.6
B
Question 5 Why did Molly and Jonas react differently to the drill? RL.3.9
B
Question 6 According to The Tornado Drill, how is preparing for a tornado different than preparing
for a hurricane? RL.3.9
D
Question 7
Literary Constructed Response
RL.3.6
Question 8
Literary Constructed Response
RL.3.9
Question 9 What did Clara Barton do before she helped in the Civil War? RI.3.3
B
Question 10 Following the Civil War, what event caused Clara to start the American Red Cross?
RL.3.6
D
Question 11 How does the author of Red Cross Story, feel about the Red Cross? RI.3.6
C
Question 12 Why did the author probably write Red Cross Story? RI.3.6
B
Question 13 Which key detail can be found in both texts? RI.3.9
D
Question 14 What is the most significant difference between Red Cross Story and Clara Barton?
RI.3.9
A
Question 15
Informational Text Constructed Response
RL.3.6
Question 16
Informational Text Constructed Response
RL.3.9
Write and Revise
Question 17
Brief Opinion Write W.3.1c
Question 18 Which statements below could add appropriate supporting details in the blanks to
the opinion paragraph? W.3.1b
B
Question 19 The student wants to choose words that would be more convincing for his teacher.
Which words would be the best replacements for the underlined words? L 3.3.a
A
Question 20 Which sentence corrects the underlined grammar usage error? L.3.2e
D
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Quarter Four
2014-15
ELA CFAssessment
Student Copy
Student Name
_______________________
Student Directions: Read the Directions.
Part 1
Your assignment:
You will read texts about natural disasters and the Red Cross.
As you read, take notes on these sources.
Then you will answer several research questions about these sources.
These will help you plan to write an opinion piece
Steps you will be following:
In order to help you plan and write your report, you will do all of the following:
1. Read the texts about natural disasters.
2. Answer several questions about the sources.
3. Plan your opinion piece.
Directions for beginning:
You will now read the texts. Take notes because you may want to refer to your notes while you can to write your
opinion piece. You can refer to any of the sources as often as you like.
Questions
Answer the questions. Your answers to these questions will be scored. Also, they will help you think about the
sources you’ve read, which should help you plan your opinion piece.
Part 2
Performance Task
Your assignment: You have been asked to write an opinion piece about why you someday want to work for the
American Red Cross for a class report. Write your opinion piece. Support your reasons using evidence from
Tornado Drills, A Tornado, a Boy and a Frog, and Clara Barton, American Red Cross Founder.
You will:
1.
Plan your writing. You may use your notes and answers.
2.
Write – Revise and Edit your first draft (your teacher will give you paper).
3.
Write a final draft of your opinion essay.
How You Will Be Scored
Purpose
Do you clearly state your opinion? Do you stay on topic?
Organization
Do your ideas flow logically from the introduction to conclusion? Do you
use effective transitions?
Elaboration:
of evidence
Do you provide evidence from sources about your opinions and elaborate
with specific information?
Elaboration:
of language and
vocabulary
Conventions
Do you express your ideas effectively? Do you use precise language that
is appropriate for your audience and purpose?
Do you use punctuation, capitalization and spelling correctly?
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Grade Equivalent 4.1
Lexile Measure 750L
Mean Sentence Length 12.32
Mean Log Word Frequency 3.73
Word Count 345
The Tornado Drill
Ginger Jay
The alarm went off again. Jonas knew what to do this time. They all had to go out in the
hall, sit next to each other, and curl up into a ball. This was in case there was a tornado.
Jonas did not understand how in the world going into the hall and curling up into a ball
would help you if you got hit by a tornado.
Then his teacher had told him that they went into the hall to be away from windows
that might break during a tornado. Curling up was in case something fell on you. That’s
why they put their hands over their neck, to protect it in case something sharp fell.
Molly was a new girl in class. She sat next to Jonas. When the alarm went off, Molly hid
under her desk. Jonas had to tell her to get out from under her desk and follow the class
into the hall.
It turned out to be a drill, just like last time. After a few minutes, all the students went
back into their classroom and sat back down at their desks.
After school, Jonas teased Molly about hiding under her desk when the alarm went off.
“Scaredy cat!” he said. Molly laughed at him. “I wasn’t scared,” she said.
Molly explained that she had moved from California last week. In her old school when
the alarm went off it was an earthquake drill. During the earthquake drill you were told
to hide under your desk.
Jonas’ friend Sam, heard them. Sam told them that once when he was visiting cousins in
Florida, the weather man said a hurricane had formed nearby. So school was closed the
next day.
Jonas remembered that his cousins who lived up North had three days in a row with no
school because it wouldn’t stop snowing.
“I think earthquakes and tornadoes are the scariest storms, “ said Molly. “The weather
man can tell us if a hurricane or snowstorm will come. But, with earthquakes and
tornadoes, you never know.”
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1. Why did Jonas go into the hall?
A. In case there was a tornado.
B. There was an earthquake drill.
C. There was a hurricane nearby.
D. It wouldn’t stop snowing.
Standard RL.3.3
Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits,
motivations, or feelings) and explain how their
actions contribute to the sequence of events
2. Why did Molly hide under her desk?
A. She knew it was a tornado drill.
B. She was scared.
C. She thought it was an earthquake drill.
D. It wouldn’t stop snowing.
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3. In The Tornado Drill, how does the author help readers?
A.
The story explains what to do in case of a tornado.
B.
The author explained what happens in California.
C. The story explains why Molly moved.
D. The author compared and contrasted scary storms.
Standard RL.3.6
Distinguish their own point of view from that of
the narrator or those of the characters.
4. Why did the author probably write The Tornado Drill?
A. The author wanted to explain what would happen if
something fell on you.
B. The author wanted to describe what to do in case of a
tornado.
C. The author wanted to have an earthquake drill.
D. The author wanted to convince readers that storms
are scary.
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5. Why did Molly and Jonas react differently to the drill?
A. Molly did not want to go into the hallway with the other
students.
B. Molly was used to earthquake drills, while Jonas’s
school prepared students for tornadoes.
C. Jonas and Molly both felt that preparing for disasters
was important.
D. Molly was scared, but Jonas was not.
Standard RL.3.9
Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and
plots of stories written by the same author about
the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from
a series)
6. According to The Tornado Drill, how is preparing for a
tornado different than preparing for a hurricane?
A.
When the alarm goes off, there will always be a tornado.
B.
You need to be prepared for tornadoes and hurricanes.
C. There is no school during a tornado but there may be school
right before a hurricane strikes.
D. There isn’t much time to prepare for a tornado but there is
more time to prepare for a hurricane.
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7. Explain why the author probably wrote The Tornado Drill.
Standard RL.3.6
Distinguish their own point of view from that of
the narrator or those of the characters
7. Explain the similarities and differences between tornado and
earthquake drills. Give examples from the story.
Standard RL.3.9
Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and
plots of stories written by the same author about
the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from
a series)
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CLARA BARTON
AMERICAN RED CROSS FOUNDER
Grade Equivalent 4.1
Lexile Measure 520L
Mean Sentence Length 9.16
Mean Log Word Frequency 3.76
Word Count 632
When a disaster strikes, the Red Cross is there to help. A disaster could be a flood, fire or hurricane. The Red Cross
brings food, water and supplies to help the victims. To many people, the Red Cross is a light of hope. The American Red
Cross was started by a shy woman named Clara Barton.
Clara Barton was born on December 25, 1821. She was the youngest of five children. Her older sisters taught her
everything they knew. Clara was always asking questions. She loved to learn.
As a child, Clara was very shy. Her family worried about her. They wanted her to learn to talk to people and to stop
being afraid. At school Clara was too shy to talk to the other girls.
Clara liked to be home. She was close to her brother David. He taught her to ride a horse. Together they explored
caves. Then David fell and was hurt very badly. Clara surprised her family. She said she would take care of David. When
she took care of David she forgot to be afraid.
After David was well, Clara tried school again but now she made many friends. She had learned to not be shy. Her
friends and family called her “little nurse.” Clara loved to help hurt animals and people who were sick.
When Clara was seventeen she became a teacher. She taught in a one-room schoolhouse. She had forty students.
She loved to teach but after ten years of teaching Clara wanted to try something new. She went to college. She learned
new languages. She learned about history and science. After college Clara felt she could do more with her life. She
wanted a greater purpose. Her father told her, “Serve your country, honor God, and love mankind.” It wasn’t long
before Barton would find a way to serve.
In April 1860, the Civil War began in America. Clara wanted to help the hurt soldiers. She asked the War Department if
she could go to the soldiers and give them medicine and food. They did not want a woman to go to the battlefield. But
Clara kept asking anyway. Finally a colonel gave her six wagons loaded with food, medicine, blankets, water, and other
supplies. Clara Barton went to the battlefield!
The soldiers called her “Angel of the Battlefield.” She seemed like an angel as she passed out cups of cool water or
pieces of bread. She helped as many soldiers as she could.
She asked President Lincoln if she could help find missing soldiers. Many families wrote Clara to ask for her help. With
permission from President Lincoln, she was allowed to search for missing soldiers.
After the war Clara went to Europe to rest. In Europe she saw Red Cross workers. The Red Cross could help many more
people than she could by herself. Clara wished America had a Red Cross too.
She asked if she could start a Red Cross in the United States. She was happy when she was told yes. Clara was put in
charge of the new American Red Cross. She went from town to town and told others about the Red Cross. She told them
the Red Cross helped people when there were fires and floods. Everyone liked Clara. But they did not know if America
really needed a Red Cross.
Then in 1881 Michigan had many forest fires. People sent money to the Red Cross to help fight the fires. Each time a
new disaster struck, Clara and the American Red Cross were ready to help!
The American Red Cross opened a building in Washington, D.C. in 1893. From a shy little girl Clara Barton became a
teacher, a nurse, a finder of missing persons and founder of America’s Red Cross. She died on April 12, 1922. She was
ninety-one years old. The American Red Cross, her greatest achievement, lives on.
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Grade Equivalent 1.9
Lexile Measure 600L
Mean Sentence Length 9.73
Mean Log Word Frequency 3.67
Word Count 292
Red Cross Story
A Tornado, a boy and a frog
Posted Jul 9, 2012 by the Mother of a Two Year Old Boy
On May 3rd, 1999, an F5 tornado struck Oklahoma. This tornado was said to be the strongest
wind ever recorded. We were a direct hit. We went to our neighbor’s basement.
The tornado ripped away the house. Debris fell on us from the sky. We had to fight our way out
of a pit. There was lumber, nails, glass, crushed cement and bricks. A large gas tank had been
ripped loose. It was right over us. It leaked gas into the hole we were in.
We threw our 2 year old son over the edge. He waited in the dark by himself. It was pouring
rain. We fought our way out to join him.
We survived, but our little son was so afraid and quiet and sad. We stayed at the local court
house, then a hotel room. The Red Cross was there with food and clothing. The Red Cross had a
"store" set up where we could get the things we needed most. Our little son found a stuffed toy,
Mr. Frog, in the store. Mr. Frog had a pull string and sang the most beautiful lullaby. Mr. Frog
calmed our son. And believe it or not, we all found comfort as well.
The Red Cross was there first and they were the best. They helped us when we needed it most.
We will never part with our little green friend Mr. Frog. He is in the treasure box of our new
home. And yes he still sings! Thank you Red Cross. We will always choose Red Cross when we
are able to give to help others too.
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9. What did Clara Barton do before she helped in the Civil
War?
A. She asked President Lincoln to find missing soldiers.
B. Clara was a teacher in a one room school house.
C. Clara delivered cool water and pieces of bread to as
many soldiers as she could
D. She started the American Red Cross.
Standard RI.3.3
Describe the relationship between a series of
historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or
steps in technical procedures in a text, using
language that pertains to time, sequence, and
cause/effect
10. Following the Civil War, what event caused Clara to
start the American Red Cross?
A.
When her brother was hurt, Clara helped take care of him.
B.
Clara was a teacher to forty students in a one room school
house.
C.
Clara helped many soldiers on the battle field.
D.
When Clara was in Europe, she saw Red Cross workers.
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11. How does the author of Red Cross Story, feel about the Red
Cross?
A. The author feels the Red Cross is only helpful for small
children and not adults.
B. The author feels the Red Cross can help stop tornadoes
from happening.
C. The author feels the Red Cross is helpful to anyone in need
after a disaster.
D. The author feels the Red Cross helps a little bit, but not
enough.
Standard RI.3.6
Distinguish their own point of view
from that of the author of a text.
12. Why did the author probably write Red Cross Story?
A. The author wants to explain what happens during an F5
tornado.
B. The author wants to explain how the Red Cross helped them
after a disaster.
C. The author wants to describe how a family feels after
experiencing a disaster.
D. The author wants to convince people to donate money to the
Red Cross.
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13. Which key detail can be found in both texts?
A. The American Red Cross provides food and clothing.
B. The American Red Cross had a store set up where people
could get the things they needed the most.
C. The American Red Cross opened a building in Washington
D.C.
D. The American Red Cross still helps people today.
Standard RI.3.9
Compare and contrast the most important
points and key details presented in two texts
on the same topic.
14. What is the most significant difference between Red
Cross Story and Clara Barton?
A. One is about how the American Red Cross was founded and
the other was about how the Red Cross helped a family after a
disaster.
B. One was about how Clara Barton helped her brother after he
fell and the other one was about Mr. Frog helping a boy when
he was afraid.
C. One was about how fires broke out in Michigan and the other
was about an F5 tornado in Oklahoma.
D. One was about keeping a little boy calm after a tornado and the
other one was about bringing comfort to soldiers during a war.
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15. Explain why the author probably wrote “Red Cross Story: A Tornado, A Boy,
and a Frog.” Use details from the text to explain your answer.
Standard RI.3.6
Distinguish their own point of view from
that of the author of a text.
16. Explain what you learned about the American Red Cross using examples and
details from both texts, then summarize how both texts are the same and
different.
Standard RI.3.9
Compare and contrast the most important
points and key details presented in two
texts on the same topic.
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17. A student is writing an opinion speech for her class about the American Red
Cross. Read the draft of his opinion piece and complete the task that follows.
Write a Brief Text, W.3.1c, connect opinion to reason with linking words, Writing Target 6a
Red Cross Facts
• The American Red Cross
opened a building in
Washington, D.C. in 1893.
• The Red Cross assists in
all and any disasters.
• The Red Cross began in
Europe.
• People have been
depending on the Red
Cross since 1881.
Why the Red Cross is Important to America
Paragraph 1
The American Red Cross founder was Clara Barton. She began
helping soldiers during the Civil War. Since then her legacy lives on.
Paragraph 2
There are facts about the American Red Cross that can help all of us
understanding its importance.
Paragraph 3
I’m thankful that we can always depend on the Red Cross!
Using information from the chart, and in your own words, add one or more
sentences to paragraph two that give more details to support and help
convince others of the student’s opinion.
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18. A student is writing a paragraph with her opinion about Clara in Clara Barton,
American Red Cross Founder. Read the student’s draft.
Revise a Text, W.3.1b adding or deleting details that do/not support an opinion, Writing Target 6b
In my opinion, Clara was brave and helpful ! First she was brave. She went into the
battlefield to help Civil War soldiers. That shows bravery. (a)_______________.
Second she was helpful. Many families asked Clara for her help. (b) ____________.
Which statements below could add appropriate supporting details in the blanks
to the opinion paragraph?
A. (a) Clara’s brother taught her to ride a horse.
(b) She taught in a one-room school house.
B. (a) Because she was brave, Clara took six wagons of food and medicine to
hurt soldiers
(b) Because she was helpful, Clara searched for soldiers during the war.
C. (a) People who are brave are also shy.
(b) People who are helpful go to college to learn.
D. (a) She was brave for starting the Red Cross in America.
(b) Clara’s greatest achievement is starting the Red Cross.
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19. A student is trying to convince her teacher that her class needs to learn
more about natural disasters. She really wants to learn about tornadoes.
Read the draft of the letter she wrote to her teacher then answer the question
that follows.
Language and Vocabulary, L.3a Academic, Domain Specific Language, Writing Target 8
Tornadoes can cause a lot of damage and hurt many people. Even though we do
not live in tornado country, someday we may move to a part of the country that
does. It would be smart for us to learn about them now so we can be prepared!
The student wants to choose words that would be more convincing for her
teacher. Which words would be the best replacements for the underlined
words?
A. destruction, educational
B. debris, best
C. smashing, cool
D. ripping, helpful
20. A student is writing about different disaster drills. Read the sentences
fro her story and the question that follows.
Edit and Clarify L.3.2e, adding suffixes to base words, Target 9
There are many disaster drills practiced in schools. Some parts of the country
have tornados and students go into hallways. In an earthquake drill, you will
crouch under your desk. Others have hurricanes and snowstorms and schools
will close. I think it is the hardiest to crawl under your desk.
Which sentence corrects the underlined grammar usage error?
A. I think it is the hardyest to crawl under your desk.
B. I think it is the hard to crawl under your desk.
C. I think it is the harder to crawl under your desk.
D. I think it is the hardest to crawl under your desk.
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STOP
Close your books and wait for instructions!
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Student Directions: Read the Directions.
Part 2
Performance Task
Your assignment: You have been asked to write an opinion piece about why you someday want to work for the
American Red Cross for a class report. Write your opinion piece. Support your reasons using evidence from Tornado
Drills, A Tornado, a Boy and a Frog, and Clara Barton, American Red Cross Founder.
You will:
1.
Plan your writing. You may use your notes and answers.
2.
Write – Revise and Edit your first draft (your teacher will give you paper).
3.
Write a final draft of your opinion piece.
How You Will Be Scored
Purpose
Do you clearly state your opinion? Do you stay on topic?
Organization
Do your ideas flow logically from the introduction to conclusion? Do you
use effective transitions?
Elaboration:
of evidence
Do you provide evidence from sources about your opinions and elaborate
with specific information?
Elaboration:
of language and
vocabulary
Conventions
Do you express your ideas effectively? Do you use precise language that
is appropriate for your audience and purpose?
Do you use punctuation, capitalization and spelling correctly?
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STOP
Close your books and wait for instructions!
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Student Scoring Color the box green if your answer was correct. Color the box red if your answer was
not correct.
Literary Text
1
Why did Jonas go into the hall? RL.3
2
Why did Molly hide under her desk? RL.3
3
In The Tornado Drill, how does the author help readers? RL.3.6
4
Why did the author probably write The Tornado Drill? RL.3.6
5
6
7
Explain why the author probably wrote The Tornado Drill. RL.3.6
2
1
0
8
Explain the similarities and differences between
tornado and earthquake drills. Give examples from the
story.
2
1
0
3
Informational Text
9
What did Clara Barton do before she helped in the Civil War? RI.3.3
10
Following the Civil War, what event caused Clara to start the American Red Cross?
RL.3.6
11
How does the author of Red Cross Story, feel about the Red Cross? RI.3.6
12
Why did the author probably write Red Cross Story? RI.3.6
13
Which key detail can be found in both texts? RI.3.9
14
What is the most significant difference between Red Cross Story and Clara Barton?
RI.3.9
15
Explain why the author probably wrote Red Cross Story: A
Tornado, A Boy, and a Frog.” Use details from the text to
explain your answer. RI.3.6
2
1
0
16
Explain what you learned about the American Red Cross using
examples and details from both texts, then summarize how
both texts are the same and different. RI.3.9
2
1
0
1
0
Writing
17
Using information from the chart, and in your own words, add one or
more sentences to paragraph two that give more details to support and
help convince others of the student’s opinion. W.3.1c
18
Which statements below could add appropriate supporting details in the blanks to
the opinion paragraph? W.3.1b
19
The student wants to choose words that would be more convincing for his teacher.
Which words would be the best replacements for the underlined words? L 3.3.a
20
Which sentence corrects the underlined grammar usage error? L.3.2e
2
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Reflection Page
1st minute
Something I did well on….
2nd Minute
Something that was new to me or I need more practice with…
3rd Minute
Something I don’t understand….
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