Winter Quarter
Acts of Worship
Definitions
ACTS – something done, the action of carrying something out, personal behavior, something done
intentionally
WORSHIP – adoration, reverence, respect, devotion
Quarter Theme: Worship as it pertains to a human response to God.
Lady Vivian Finnell/Christ Temple Apostolic Faith Assembly, Indianapolis, IN
UNIT 2
Learning to Pray
The four lessons in this unit look at prayer as found in Luke, John,
Hebrews and James.
January 4, 2015
A Model for Prayer
Bible Background • LUKE 11
Printed Text • LUKE 11:1–13
Devotional Reading • PSALM 103:1–13
Definitions
Model – representation, copy, reproduce, suggest
For- designed for, intended for, in favor of
Prayer– entreat, appeal, request, desire
“And he said unto them, When ye pray, say, Our Father which art in heaven,
Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth” (Luke 11:2).
LESSON AIM
By the end of the lesson, we will: UNDERSTAND the Lord’s Prayer as a model for praying various kinds of prayers; ACCEPT the need for
constant prayer; and DEVELOP a more disciplined prayer life as a means of growing a relationship with God.
Lady Vivian Finnell/Christ Temple Apostolic Faith Assembly, Indianapolis, IN
January 4, 2015
St. Luke:
BACKGROUND
Luke’s Gospel is the first of two books addressed to a man named Theophilus (1:2; Acts 1:1). Although the author is not identified by name in either book, the
unanimous testimony of early Christianity and the corroborating internal evidence o9f the two books point to common authorship by Luke.
Apparently Luke was a Gentile covert, the only non-Jewish author of a Bible Book. The Holy Spirit prompted him to write to Theophilus (whose name means “one
who loves God”) in order to fill a need in the Gentile church for a full account of the beginning of Christianity. This included two parts (1) Jesus’ birth, life and
ministry , death, resurrection, and ascension (Luke’s Gospel) , and (2) the outpouring of the Spirit at Jerusalem and the subsequent development of the early church
(book of Acts). These two books comprise more than one-fourth of the N. T.
From Paul’s letters we lean that Luke was a “beloved physician” (Col 4:14) and a loyal co-worker with Paul. From Luke’s own writings we know he was welleducated, a skilled writer, a careful historian, and an inspired theologian. When he wrote his Gospel, the Gentile church apparently had no completed or widely
circulated Gospel about Jesus. Mathew wrote initially to the Jews, and Mark wrote a concise Gospel for the church in Rome. The Greek –speaking Gentile world did
have oral accounts about Jesus by eyewitnesses, as well as short written digests, but no complete and orderly Gospel. Thus Luke set about to investigate everything
carefully “from the very first” (1:3), probably doing research in Palestine while Paul as in prison at Caesarea (Acts 21:17; 23:23-26:32) and completing his Gospel
toward the end of that time or soon after arriving in Rome with Paul (Acts 28:16)
Luke wrote this Gospel to the Gentiles to provide4 a full and accurate3 record “of all that Jesus began both to do and teach. In Luke, Jesus is clearly seen as
the divine –human Savior who came as God’s provision of salvation for all of Adam’s descendants.
FULL LIFE STUDY BIBLE/KJV pg 1519
January 4, 2015
St. Luke : SURVEY
Luke’s Gospel :
•Begins with the most complete infancy narratives (1:5-2:40)
•Gives the only glimpse in the Gospels of Jesus boyhood (2:41-5:52)
After describing John the Baptist’s ministry and giving the genealogy of Jesus, Luke divides Jesus ministry into three major sections
1. His ministry in and around Galilee (4:14-9:50)
2. His ministry during the final journey to Jerusalem (9:51-19:27)
3. His last week in Jerusalem (19:28-24:43)
While Jesus’ miracles are prominent in Luke’s record of His Galilean ministry, the main focus in this Gospel is on Jesus' teaching and parables during His extended ministry on
the way to Jerusalem (9:51-19”27). This section comprises the greatest block of material unique to Luke, and includes many well –loved stories and parable, The pivotal verse
(9:51)and the key verse (19:10) of the Gospel occur at the beginning and toward the end of this special Lukan material.
Special Features of Luke:
Eight major features or emphases characterize Luke’s Gospel:
1) It is the most comprehensive Gospel, recording events in Jesus’ life from pre-birth to His ascension , and is the longest book in the N.T.
2) It is the most literacy of the Gospel, demonstrating exceptional style and content, a rich vocabulary, and excellent command of Greek..
3) It emphasizes the universal scope of the gospel, that Jesus came to bring salvation for Jews and Gentiles alike..
4) It stresses Jesus’ concern for the underprivileged, including women, children, the poor, and social outcast.
5) It emphasizes Jesus’ prayer life and His teaching about prayer.
6) The prominent title for Jesus in this Gospel is “Son of man”.
7) The response of joy characterizes those who accept Jesus and His messages.
8) The Holy Spirit is given a place of prominence and importance in the life of Jesus and of His people .
FULL LIFE STUDY BIBLE/KJV pg 1520
January 4, 2015
St. Luke 11:1-13
M AT T H E W H E N R Y C O M M E N TA R Y
In this chapter, Luke 11:1-13 Christ teaches his disciples to pray, and quickens and encourages them to be frequent, instant, and importunate in prayer,
Prayer is one of the great laws of natural religion.
• That man is a brute, is a monster, that never prays, that never gives glory to his Maker, nor feels his favour, nor owns his dependence upon him.
• One great design therefore of Christianity is to assist us in prayer, to enforce the duty upon us, to instruct us in it, and encourage us to expect advantage by it.
I.
We find Christ himself praying in a certain place, probably where he used to pray, Luke 11:1.
•
As God, He was prayed to; as man, He prayed; and, though He was a Son, yet learned He this obedience.
II. His disciples applied themselves to him for direction in prayer. When he was praying, they asked, Lord, teach us to pray.
•
“Lord, teach me what it is to pray;
•
Lord, excite and quicken me to the duty;
•
Lord, direct me what to pray for;
•
Lord, give me praying graces, that I may serve God acceptably in prayer;
•
Lord, teach me to pray in proper words; give me a mouth and wisdom in prayer, that I may speak as I ought; teach me what I shall say.”
Biblegatway.com
January 4, 2015
St. Luke 11:1-13
M AT T H E W H E N R Y C O M M E N TA R Y
II. His disciples applied themselves to him for direction in prayer. When he was praying, they asked, Lord, teach us to pray. (continued)
•
Their plea is, “As John also taught his disciples.
•
He took care to instruct his disciples in this necessary duty, and we would be taught as they were, for we have a better Master than they had.”
•
Dr. Lightfoot’s notion of this is, That whereas the Jews’ prayers were generally adorations, and praises of God, and doxologies, John taught his disciples such
prayers as were more filled up with petitions and requests; for it is said of them that they did deeseis poiountai—make prayers, Luke 5:33.
•
The word signifies such prayers as are properly petitionary. “Now, Lord, teach us this, to be added to those benedictions of the name of God which
we have been accustomed to from our childhood.”
•
Christ was more ready to teach than ever John Baptist was, and particularly taught to pray better than John did, or could, teach his disciples.
III. Christ gave them direction, much the same as he had given them before in his sermon upon the mount, Matt. 6:9 (contimued)
•
In Matthew he had directed them to pray after this manner; here, When ye pray, say; which intimates that the Lord’s prayer was intended to be used both as a
form of prayer and a directory.
•
There are some differences between the Lord’s prayer in Matthew and Luke, by which it appears that it was not the design of Christ that we should be tied up to
these very words, for then there would have been no variation.
Biblegatway.com
January 4, 2015
St. Luke 11:1-13
M AT T H E W H E N R Y C O M M E N TA R Y
III. Christ gave them direction, much the same as he had given them before in his sermon upon the mount, Matt. 6:9 (continued)
•
•
Here is one difference in the translation only, which ought not to have been, when there is none in the original, and that is in the third petition:
•
As in heaven, so in earth; whereas the words are the very same, and in the same order, as in Matthew.
•
But there is a difference in the fourth petition. In Matthew we pray, “Give us daily bread this day:” here, “Give it us day by day”—kath hemeran
Day by day; that is, “Give us each day the bread which our bodies require, as they call for it:” not, “Give us this day bread for many days to come;” but as the
Israelites had manna,
•
“Let us have bread to-day for to-day, and to-morrow for to-morrow;” for thus we may be kept in a continual dependence upon God, as children upon their parents,
and may have our mercies fresh from his hand daily, and may find ourselves under fresh obligations to do the work of every day in the day, according as the duty
of the day requires, because we have from God the supplies of every day in the day, according as the necessity of the day requires.
•
Here is likewise some difference in the fifth petition. In Matthew it is, Forgive us our debts, as we forgive: here it is, Forgive us our sins; which proves that our sins are
our debts.
•
“Lord, forgive us”, for thou hast Thyself inclined us to forgive others.
•
we plead not only in general, We forgive our debtors, but in particular, “We profess to forgive every one that is indebted to us, without exception.
•
We so forgive our debtors as not to bear malice or ill-will to any, but true love to all, without any exception whatsoever.
Biblegatway.com
January 4, 2015
St. Luke 11:1-13
R E F O R M AT I O N S T U D Y B I B L E
Luke 11:1
Lord, teach us to pray. Religious teachers were expected to teach their disciples how to pray
Luke 11:2–4
This form of the “Lord’s Prayer” differs slightly from that in Matt. 6:9–13. In Matthew, the prayer is given in a sermon; here it is given in answer to a question.
VS. 2 Father. This corresponds to the Aramaic Abba, the usual word for addressing a father in the family. name.
•Names are representative of the person.
•The petition is that people will reverence God.
kingdom come. Jesus taught often about God’s kingdom, and the prayer asks for it to be established.
Vs 4 - forgive us . . . for we ourselves forgive.
•Sinners need the forgiveness of sins each day.
•If people do not forgive others they are not in a condition to receive forgiveness themselves.
Vs 7- In a one-room house the whole family would sleep on a raised platform, and for one person to get up would disturb them all.
Vs 8 - Friendship is not enough to make him get up, but persistence is.
Vs 13 - you . . . evil. Universal sinfulness is presupposed.
Biblegatway.com
January 4, 2015
Points of Hope for Life Application
• In this 21st Century church, the saint of God must be willing and desirous to learn as they are being taught.
• Remembering that the ‘Lord’s Prayer” as it is called, is a MODEL prayer, not to necessarily to be quoted verbatim. We are to replicate the
structure/order when you enter into prayer to the Father,
• The consistency of earnest prayer must be a goal and desire for the saint of God.
• It is not enough for the child of God to desire and be willing to accept God’s blessings, they must be willing and desirous to seek the will of
God for the blessings. He knows are best for the child of God and for furthering of the Kingdom on earth
• The saint of God, must be willing to forgive and treat others as they want to be forgiven and treated.
January 11, 2015
Jesus Prays For His Disciples
Bible Background • JOHN 17
Printed Text • JOHN 17:6–21
Devotional Reading • JOHN 15:1–1
Definitions
Prays – implore, plead, entreat, beseech
For- designed for, intended for, in favor of
His – belonging to him
Disciples – follower, believer, supporter, devotee, student
““That they all may be one; as thou, Father, art in me, and I in thee, that they also may be
one in us: that the world may believe that thou hast sent me” (John 17:21).
LESSON AIM
By the end of the lesson, we will: REVIEW Jesus’ prayer for the unity of all who believe in Him; REFLECT on the intimacy of Jesus in your
life through prayer; and UNITE in prayer for one another and for unity in Jesus Christ.
Lady Vivian Finnell/Christ Temple Apostolic Faith Assembly, Indianapolis, IN
J a n u a r y 11 , 2 0 1 5
St. John 17: 6-12
Summary
M AT T H E W H E N R Y C O M M E N TA R Y
With minor modifications)
This chapter is a prayer, it is the Lord’s (model) prayer, the Lord Christ’s prayer. There was one “Lord’s” prayer (St. Luke 11:1-3) which he taught us to pray, and did
not pray himself, for he needed not to pray for the forgiveness of sin; but this was properly and peculiarly his, and suited him only as a Mediator, and is a
sample of his intercession, and yet is of use to us both for instruction and encouragement in prayer.
Observe,:
I.
The circumstances of the prayer, John 17:1
II. . II. The prayer itself.
1.
He prays for himself, John 17:1-5
2.
He prays for those that are his.
1.
And in this see,
1.
The general pleas with which he introduces his petitions for them, John 17:6-10
2.
The particular petitions he puts up for them
[1.] That they might be kept, John 17:11-16.
[2.] That they might be sanctified, John 17:17-19
[3.] That they might be united, John 17:11; 20-23
[4.] That they might be glorified, John 17:24-26
Biblegatway.com
J a n u a r y 11 , 2 0 1 5
St. John 17: 6-12
Summary
M AT T H E W H E N R Y C O M M E N TA R Y
With minor modifications)
Verses 6–10
Christ, having prayed for himself, comes next to pray for those that are his, and he knew them by name, though he did not here name them. Now observe here,
I.
Whom he did not pray for (John 17:9): I pray not for the world.
a)
Note, There is a world of people that Jesus Christ did not pray for
b)
. It is not meant of the world of mankind general (he prays for that here, John 17:21
II. That the world may believe that thou hast sent me);
a)
nor is it meant of the Gentiles, in distinction from the Jews;
b)
but the world is here opposed to the elect, who are given to Christ out of the world.
c)
Take the world for a heap of unwinnowed corn in the floor,
a)
and God loves it,
b)
Christ prays for it,
c)
and dies for it, for a blessing is in it;
d)
but, the Lord perfectly knowing those that are his,
e)
he eyes particularly those that were given him out of the world, extracts them;
f)
and then take the world for the remaining heap of rejected, worthless chaff,
g)
and Christ neither prays for it, nor dies for it, but abandons it, and the wind drives it away.
Biblegatway.com
J a n u a r y 11 , 2 0 1 5
St. John 17: 6-12
Summary
M AT T H E W H E N R Y C O M M E N TA R Y
With minor modifications)
Verses 6–10 (continued)
I.
These are called the world, because they are governed by the spirit of this world, and have their portion in it;
a)
for these Christ does not pray; not but that there are some things which he intercedes with God for on their behalf, as the dresser for the reprieve
of the barren tree;
b)
but he does not pray for them in this prayer, that have not part nor lot in the blessings here prayed for.
c)
He does not say, I pray against the world, as Elias made intercession against Israel;
d)
but, I pray not for them, I pass them by, and leave them to themselves; they are not written in the Lamb’s book of life, and therefore not in
the breast-plate of the great high-priest.
e)
And miserable is the condition of such, as it was of those whom the prophet was forbidden to pray for, and more so,Jer. 7:16. We that know not
who are chosen, and who are passed by, must pray for all men, 1 Tim. 2:1, 4.
f)
While there is life, there is hope, and room for prayer. See 1 Sam. 12:23.
Biblegatway.com
J a n u a r y 11 , 2 0 1 5
St. John 17: 6-12
Summary
M AT T H E W H E N R Y C O M M E N TA R Y
With minor modifications)
Verses 6–10 (continued)
II. Whom he did pray for; not for angels, but for the children of men.
a) He prays for those that were given him, meaning primarily the disciples that had attended him in this regeneration;
b) but it is doubtless to be extended further, to all who come under the same character, who receive and believe the words of Christ, John 17:6, 8.
c) He prays for all that should believe on him (John 17:20),
d) and it is not only the petitions that follow,
a) but those also which went before,
b) that must be construed to extend to all believers,
c) in every place and every age;
d) for he has a concern for them all,
e) and calls things that are not as though they were
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J a n u a r y 11 , 2 0 1 5
M AT T H E W H E N R Y C O M M E N TA R Y
St. John 17: 6-12
Summary
With minor modifications
Verses 6–10 (continued)
III. What encouragement he had to pray for them, and what are the general pleas with which he introduces his petitions for them, and recommends them to
his Father’s favour;
They are five:—
1. The charge he had received concerning them: Thine they were, and thou gavest them me(John 17:6), and again (John 17:9), Thou whom thou
hast given me. “Father, those I am now praying for are such as thou hast entrusted me with, and what I have to say for them is in pursuance of the
charge I have received concerning them.” Now,
(1.) This is meant primarily of the disciples that then were, who were given to Christ as his pupils to be educated by him while he was on earth,
and his agents to be employed for him when he went to heaven.
a) They were given him to be the learners of his doctrine,
b) the witnesses of his life and miracles,
c) and the monuments of his grace and favour, in order to their being the publishers of his gospel
d) and the planters of his church.
(2) When they left all to follow him, this was the secret spring of that strange resolution: they were given to him, else they had not given
themselves to him. Christ received this gift for men, that he might give it to men. As this puts a great honour upon the ministry of the
gospel, and magnifies that office, which is so much vilified; so it lays a mighty obligation upon the ministers of the gospel to devote
themselves entirely to Christ’s service, as being given to him,
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J a n u a r y 11 , 2 0 1 5
M AT T H E W H E N R Y C O M M E N TA R Y
St. John 17: 6-12
With minor modifications)
Verses 6–10 (continued)
They are five:— con’t
[4.] They have set their seal to it: They have known surely that I came out from God, John 17:8. See here,
First, What it is to believe; it is to know surely, to know that it is so of a truth. The disciples were very weak and defective in knowledge; yet Christ, who
knew them better than they knew themselves, passes his word for them that they did believe.
Secondly, What it is we are to believe: that Jesus Christ came out from God, as he is the Son of God, in his person the image of the invisible God, and that
God did send him; that in his undertaking he is the ambassador of the eternal king: so that the Christian religion stands upon the same footing, and is of
equal authority, with natural religion; and therefore all the doctrines of Christ are to be received as divine truths, all his commands obeyed as divine laws,
and all his promises depended upon as divine securities.
[5.] He pleads his own concern in them: I am glorified in them—dedoxasmai. (1.) I have been glorified in them. What little honour Christ had in this world
was among his disciples; he had been glorified by their attendance on him and obedience to him, their preaching and working miracles in his name; and
therefore I pray for them. Note, Those shall have an interest in Christ’s intercession in and by whom he is glorified. (2.) “I am to be glorified in them when I
am gone to heaven; they are to bear up my name.
VS.11-16 the first thing Christ prays for, for his disciples, is their preservation, in John 17:11-16, in order to which he commits them all to his
Father’s custody. Keeping supposes danger, and their danger arose from the world, the world wherein they were, the evil of this he begs they might be kept
from. Now observe,
I. The request itself: Keep them from the world. There were two ways of their being delivered from the world:—
1. By taking them out of it; and he does not pray that they might be so delivered: I pray not that thou shouldest take them out of the world; that is,
(1.) “I pray not that they may be speedily removed by death.
Biblegatway.com
J a n u a r y 11 , 2 0 1 5
St. John 17: 6-12
Summary
Reformation Study Bible
With minor modifications
John 17:6 manifested your name. Here, “name” denotes God in the beauty of His perfection as revealed to humanity.
•Yours they were. Everything and everyone belongs to God by virtue of creation, but here possession by redemption is in view. God gave the elect to the
Redeemer: “you gave me” (cf.Heb. 2:10–13).
John 17:9 I am not praying for the world.
•Jesus’ work of redemption has particular reference to the elect—those whom the Father has given Him (10:14, 15, 27–29).
•This verse strongly supports a doctrine of definite redemption: the prayer of Jesus before His sacrificial death specifies His purpose in dying.
• In other contexts, where the specific purpose of Jesus’ offering is not in precise focus, Jesus prays for His enemies, as we also are to do (Matt.
5:44; Luke 23:34). See “Definite Redemption” at 10:15.
John 17:10 I am glorified in them.
•It is surprising that God’s glory could be associated with the actions of human beings, who are so insignificant compared to the divine majesty.
•Yet people like Elihu in the Book of Job show that humans may give glory to God, and Paul affirms it of the most common activities of human beings, such
as eating and drinking (1 Cor. 10:31).
Biblegatway.com
J a n u a r y 11 , 2 0 1 5
St. John 17: 6-12
Summary
Reformation Study Bible
With minor modifications
John 17:11 Holy Father. This form of address is used only here in the New Testament.
•that they may be one, even as we are one. The unity of the Godhead, is the example for the unity of believers with one another through their union
with Christ (14:10 note).
• There is a unity of purpose and essence in the invisible church, the body of Christ.
•This perfect unity (Eph. 4:12–16), to be manifested on the day of Christ, already forms and shapes God’s people so “that the world may believe” (v. 21).
•Organized unity is no substitute for spiritual unity,. Organizational divisions and separations among Christians undoubtedly bear a negative witness in
the world (1 Cor. 1:10–13; 12:25; Gal. 5:20).
John 17:12 the son of destruction.
•The same term is used to denote the Antichrist in 2 Thess. 2:3. This fulfills Ps. 41:9.
•Judas’s betrayal was necessary for the fulfillment of many other passages descriptive of our Lord’s suffering.
•Jesus understood many Scriptures as containing prophetic announcements of various details of His messianic career. He stressed that all these would be
fulfilled because they were the Word of God
Biblegatway.com
January 11, 2015
Points of Hope for Life Application
• Unity ( to be in agreement, harmony one accord)the desire of God for His people.
• Not unity of conformity, BUT unity of purpose, and essence in the invisible church, the body of Christ.
• Prayer, an opportunity to commune with God, to listen, as well as, talk, to accept, as well as, request, to give as well as to receive.
• The consistency of earnest prayer must be a goal and desire for the saint of God.
January 18, 2015
Jesus Intercedes for Us
Bible Background • HEBREWS 4
Printed Text • HEBREWS 4:14–5:10
Devotional Reading • PSALM 107:1–15
Definitions
Intercedes– intervene, mediate, ask on somebody's behalf
For– preposition intending or intended to benefit somebody or something
“For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities;
but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin”
(Hebrews 4:15).
LESSON AIM
By the end of the lesson, we will: REVIEW how Jesus fulfills the role of intercessor with God for His people; APPRECIATE that Christians
do not stand alone before God with their sins; and PRAY with thanksgiving for our intercessor with God and tell others about Him.
Lady Vivian Finnell/Christ Temple Apostolic Faith Assembly, Indianapolis, IN
January 18, 2015
HEBREWS 4:14–5:10
Summary
Reformation Study Bible
With minor modifications
Heb 4:14–16 The sobering thought of our complete exposure before God draws us to the merciful High Priest who, having been tempted, can help us in our
weakness (themes announced in2:17, 18).
•An exhortation to “hold fast our confession” (v. 14) caps the preceding section, and an invitation to approach God’s throne introduces the discussion of
Christ as the merciful High Priest.
Heb 4:14 Seeing that we HAVE a GREAT HIGH PRIEST that passed through the heavens.
• Christ was raised, ascended, and sits at God’s right hand (8:1), where He ministers as our great and eternal High Priest (7:26; 9:11, 24).
•the Son of God. See note 1:5 (cf. 5:5). 1:5 You are my Son. The Father’s decree declaring the Messiah to be His Son is identified with Christ’s
exaltation (v. 4 note; 5:5; Acts 13:32–35; Rom. 1:4).
•Though Jesus is the eternal and divine Son of God (Mark 1:11; John 3:16), the declaration of redemptive Sonship prophesied in Ps. 2:7 was conferred on
Him in time, when He completed His messianic work.
• Believers cannot become divine and share in Christ’s eternal divine Sonship, but their adoption as sons of God means that they participate in Christ’s
redemptive Sonship through union with the “founder of their salvation” (2:10; cf. 3:14 note; Rom. 8:29).
Heb 4:15 in every respect has been tempted. This is a vivid restatement of 2:17, 18. As temptation is again mentioned, the author is careful to add that Christ
was “without sin” despite His knowledge of our weakness. See theological note “The Sinlessness of Jesus.”
Heb 4:16 Let us then with confidence draw near. Confident access to God is a priestly privilege reserved for those who have been purified from sin’s pollution
by Jesus’ sacrifice (7:19; 10:19, 22), and so can offer sacrifices of thanksgiving pleasing to God (12:28; 13:15,16). On the priestly privilege of Christian believers
see Rom. 5:1, 2; Eph. 2:13–22; 1 Pet. 2:4–10.
•mercy . . . grace to help. Mercy addresses our need for forgiveness when we have succumbed to temptation, and grace brings timely support to
sustain us in the midst of temptation (2:18).
Biblegatway.com
January 18, 2015
HEBREWS 4:14–5:10
Summary
Reformation Study Bible
With minor modifications
Heb 5:1–10 As the Old Testament priests :
•were identified with the weak and erring people whom they represented (vv. 1–3)
•and served at God’s appointment (v. 4),
•so also Christ became High Priest by the Father’s appointment (vv. 5, 6)
•and was identified with His people through suffering (vv. 7–10).
Heb 5:1 offer gifts and sacrifices for sins. The phrase “gifts and sacrifices” covers offerings of several different kinds called for in the work of Old Testament
priests (8:3; Lev. 1–7). But the main interest here is in those offered for sins.
Heb 5:2 can deal gently. The weakness of the Old Testament high priest in the face of his own temptations compelled him to moderate his indignation over
others’ sins and “deal gently” with them. Jesus’ sympathy also is strongly motivated, since He fully identifies with the struggles of His people. Yet Jesus never
succumbed to temptation (4:15). ignorant and wayward. The law (Num. 15:27–31) distinguished between sins committed out of weakness or ignorance, and
sins committed in defiance of the Lord’s authority (10:26, 27).
Heb 5:3 The Old Testament high priest was himself in need of atonement and forgiveness (7:27;9:7; Lev. 16:11), unlike our sinless High Priest (4:15; 7:26)
Heb 5:4 called by God, just as Aaron was. The initial call of Aaron (Ex. 28:1) was confirmed in response to the challenge of Korah, Dathan, and Abiram (Num.
16) through the budding of Aaron’s staff (9:4; Num. 17:1–10). The priestly privilege of approach to God is by invitation only—mediated through physical
descent for the Old Testament Levitical priests, but finally established through the divine oath to Jesus the Son (7:11–28).
Biblegatway.com
January 18, 2015
HEBREWS 4:14–5:10
Summary
Reformation Study Bible
With minor modifications
Heb 5:5 You are my Son. Ps. 2:7 is quoted twice in Hebrews (1:5), both times in a leading position. Here it is the opening step of a long and detailed discussion of Melchizedek.
Heb 5:6 Melchizedek. This mysterious figure is mentioned only twice in the Old Testament (Gen. 14:18; Ps. 110:4). But the association here of the title “priest forever, after the
order of Melchizedek” with the words “my Son” (v. 5) shows the exalted character of this priesthood, and justifies the author’s fuller explanation in ch. 7.
Heb 5:7 loud cries and tears. Jesus’ anguish at the prospect of the Cross (Mark 14:33–36; John 12:27) shows that He is not aloof from the weakness and fears that threaten us.
was heard. The psalmists praised God that He heard their cries of distress (Ps. 22:24; 30:23;116:1). Jesus’ plea for salvation from death was answered not through escape from
the ordeal of the Cross, but through His Resurrection from death.
Heb 5:8 he learned obedience. Though entirely free from sin (4:15), Jesus’ struggle against temptation was real (2:18). As One who came into the world to do the Father’s will
(10:7), Christ successfully met each increasingly difficult challenge to His integrity, climaxing in the shameful and painful death on the cross (Phil. 2:8). This life of learned
obedience offsets the disobedience of Adam (Rom. 5:19) and qualifies Christ to serve as the eternal High Priest (2:17, 18; 4:15).
Heb 5:9 being made perfect. This does not mean that Jesus finally became sinless, since He was always without sin (4:15), but that He finished the course of suffering that was
set before Him, including the sacrificial death. Having done this, He was “made perfect,” or completely qualified to serve as the uniquely effective High Priest. The language here
may allude to the concept of priestly consecration. eternal salvation. Jesus lives forever to intercede as our High Priest (7:24, 25).
Heb 5:10 Melchizedek.- Called of God, an high priest after the order of Melchizedek – meaning that He is greater than Abraham, Levi, and the Levicial priests; the author of
Hebrews considered him a type of Christ, who was both priest and king. Melchizedek emphasizes that he was a king as well as a priest. As such he is a type of Christ, who is our
prophet, priest, and king. Melchizedek was a Canaanite king of Salem and priest of God (gen. 14:18). He was superior to Abraham because Abraham paid tithes to him and was
blessed by him. (cp 7:2-7)
Biblegatway.com
January 18, 2015
Points of Hope for Life Application
•What a great assurance that Jesus is our intercessor .
•What a great reassurance Christians have that we do not stand alone before God with their sins.
•Pray with thanksgiving for our intercessor and tell others about Him.
•Prayer to the Father brings peace to your soul and in your life.
January 25, 2015
We Pray for One Another
Bible Background • JAMES 5:13-18
Printed Text • JAMES 5:13–18
Devotional Reading • LAMENTATIONS 3:52–58
Definitions
Intercedes– intervene, mediate, ask on somebody's behalf
For– preposition intending or intended to benefit somebody or something
“Therefore, confess your sins to one another, and pray for one another so that you may
be healed. The effective prayer of a righteous man can accomplish much”
(James 5:16).
LESSON AIM
By the end of the lesson, we will: EXPLORE James’ admonitions for prayer and its power to heal; AFFIRM that prayer is powerful and yields
good results; and PRAY for the sick.
Lady Vivian Finnell/Christ Temple Apostolic Faith Assembly, Indianapolis, IN
January 25, 2015
JAMES 5:13–18
The Encompassing Instructions (5:12-20)
Keep Bringing Each Other Back to the Truth (5:19-20)
Reformation Study Bible
With minor modifications
Do Not Swear (5:12) ---the basic point of the instruction in 5:12 is to ensure the integrity of one's speech without having to rely on oaths. "Let your `yes' be true and
your `no' be true" (Dibelius 1976:249)
Instead, Pray (5:13-18)
These next verses, then, are a continuation of 5:12 and give the alternative to swearing, which is praying. Most commentators miss this connection between 5:12 and
5:13, which should be noted because it is based on the letter's underlying theme of faith.
•When to Pray (5:13-14)
•James's desire to engage his readers personally, because he wants so much for them to put prayer into practice. With a poetic pattern to his sentence
construction, James shows that he intends one point with his three questions: Pray in all circumstances.
•How to Pray (5:14-16)
•James proceeds to instruct his readers in how to pray. His purpose is still to motivate them to pray, but now he encourages prayer by his vision of how he
expects prayer to operate in the church. The meaning of the verses can be seen by isolating four practices which are pictured here for an effective prayer
life.
•1. We should call upon the elders of the church for prayer.
•2. We are to pray in the name of the Lord. If the first practice expressed submission to each other in the church, this second practice expresses
submission to the Lord himself.
•3. We are to offer prayer in faith. This phrase is James's explicit return to his underlying theme as he concludes his letter, and all he has said about
faith is the background for his meaning here.
•4. The fourth principle for effective praying is to pray united as repentant sinners; we should confess . . . sins to each other and pray for each
other.
•Why Pray (5:15-18)
•James is certainly convinced that prayer brings results. Therefore his final way to encourage his readers to pray is to describe the effectiveness of prayer.
•1. The results. The conviction that prayer will bring results was implicit in 5:13-14. It becomes explicit in 5:15-16 with James's assurance of four results.
•2. The principle: The prayer of a righteous man is powerful and effective.
Biblegatway.com
January 25, 2015
JAMES 5:13–18
The Encompassing Instructions (5:12-20)
Reformation Study Bible
With minor modifications
•5:13 Let him sing praise. Colossians 3:16 (KJV) Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom; teaching and admonishing one another in psalms
hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord
and
•5:14 elders. Acts 14:23 (KJV) And when they had ordained them elders in every church, and had prayed with fasting, they commended them to the Lord, on whom
they believed Titus 1:5. For this cause left I thee in Crete, that thou shouldest set in order the things that are wanting, and ordain elders in every city, as I had appointed
thee: anointing him with oil. Olive oil was commonly used in medicine in the ancient world (Mark 6:13; Luke 10:34). The oil may also have a symbolic reference to
the healing power of God.
• 5:15 prayer of faith. There is no special “prayer of faith” that has healing power. The power of trusting and faithful prayer is accented here; the Christian community
should be devoutly engaged in intercessory prayer for the sick. This verse is the classic proof text for the institution of the Roman Catholic sacrament of extreme
unction. Extreme unction is a healing rite that has come to be thought of primarily as the “last rites” in preparation for death. Committed sins. Sin and illness are not
unrelated. Forgiveness is therapeutic to the body as well as to the soul.
•5:16 confess your sins. Though confession to a priest is not required by Scripture, confession to God and to one another is
•righteous person. A godly person who prays in faith is a just or righteous person.
•The term righteous is more than an automatic statement that "holds good for every believing petitioner," as Dibelius characterizes it (1976:256). It is a
call for every believer to reach toward righteousness. Commit yourself to doing what is right without compromise; then you may rely on God in
prayer for all your needs
•5:17 Elijah. Though Elijah held the special office of Old Testament prophet, he shares a common humanity with all believers. His effectual prayer life is a model for
the saints.
• Having emphasized righteousness as a condition for effective praying, James is not wanting Christians to postpone praying while they try to attain some level of
perfection or super spirituality
Biblegatway.com
January 25, 2015
JAMES 5:13–18
Summary - Drawing on Resources (5:13–18)
Asbury Bible Commentary » Part III: The New Testament
The paragraph beginning at 5:13 offers a cross section of circumstances in which people of the church find themselves: trouble, prosperity, sickness, and sin. These and
all experiences may and should be addressed with an awareness of the presence of the Lord. The focus is upon the agency of prayer. That is what prayer is: activating the
presence of the Lord by consciously seeking his involvement. The practice of prayer pervades the passage; but it isthe prayer offered in faith and the prayer of a
righteous man, not just a recitation of liturgy. James uses three words for prayer; together they suggest a vital relationship with the Lord, entailing personal commitment,
that may provide the energy (Gk. energoumenē) effectuating the prayer of the righteous man.
Particularly significant is the emphasis on mutuality in prayer. The meaning of fellowship is dramatized when the elders are present with the sick person. Here is prayer
plus comfort. The anointing oil ministers through touch. Here is prayer plus an act. But fundamental to the total operation is confidence in the Lord's presence and power.
Moreover, whatever sin is present must be dealt with, too, for a prayer of faith is impossible if sin is allowed to remain. This is not to be regarded as a formula for
healing but as a prescription as to how brothers can express their mutual concern and offer assistance.
Unexpectedly, James shifts his commands to the second person at 5:16 as he writes, “Confess your sins to each other.” He is now looking at the needs shared by all
members of the fellowship. The word translated “confess” means to declare openly, to deal frankly with a matter. When Christians have spiritual needs, this openness
makes it possible to pray for each other with specific petitions and thus expect wholeness in every way.
Biblegatway.com
January 25, 2015
Points of Hope for Life Application
•The 21st Century believer must still, depend on, trust in the power of prayer.
•The 21st Century believer must believe that the prayers of a righteous man( human/believer) availeth much (still
works, makes a difference).
•The 21st Century believer must make prayer a priority for maintaining and advance their Christian growth.
•The 21st Century believer must still realize that there is an urgency of prayer in the time we are living in.
•It has been stated that prayer changes “things”, since “things (stuff)” is an abstract word, this writer would
rather say “ prayer changes the person praying thoughts, actions, beliefs, hopes, resolve, desirers, actions,
reactions, etc., thus stuff (“things”) is changed because the person praying has changed.
•The 21st Century believer must realize IF they don’t pray, the work of the Kingdom on earth is diminshed., the
sick won’t be healed, the unsaved won’t be convicted , and that the prayers of the righteous keep the devil under
our feet.
February 1 , 2015
Feasting and Fasting
Bible Background • DANIEL 1:5, 8–17, MATTHEW 6:16–18, 9:14–17
Printed Text • DANIEL 1:5, 8–17, MATTHEW 6:16–18
Devotional Reading • 2 CHRONICLES 7:11–18
Definitions
Feasting – large meal, enjoy eating, take delight (prolonged pleasure),celebratory mean, a religious celebration
Fasting– going without food/drink, abstention from food, or some types of food, especially as an act of religious observance
“But thou, when thou fastest, anoint thine head, and wash thy face; That thou appear
not unto men to fast, but unto thy Father which is in secret: and thy Father, which seeth
in secret, shall reward thee openly” (Matthew 6:17–18).
LESSON AIM
By the end of this lesson, we will: KNOW and understand what Jesus said about fasting and those who fast; FEEL the value of being connected
with God through fasting; and DECIDE to voluntarily fast and pray in order to draw near to God.
Lady Vivian Finnell/Christ Temple Apostolic Faith Assembly, Indianapolis, IN
February 1 , 2015
DANIEL 1:5, 8–17, MATTHEW 6:16–18
Background: Daniel, whose name means “God is mu Judge” , is both the chief character and the author of the book which bears his name. His success in Babylon is
attributed to his integrity of character, prophetic gifts, and the interventions of God that resulted in his rapid advancement to places of prominence and responsibility.
Daniel refused to operated under the Babylonian name – Beltshazzar= I am Bail’s judge; I watch over the Bail’s stuff.
Asbury Bible Commentary » Part III: The New Testament
A Serious Choice ( Daniel Ch. 1)
Daniel, along with others, was carried into captivity as a hostage in 605 b.c. by Nebuchadnezzar's armies. The Jerusalem temple was also plundered.
Meats and drinks in Babylon were offered to idols before they were consumed. Mosaic law prohibited the Hebrews from eating such foods. Daniel arranged with a guard to test
himself and his four friends by allowing them to eat their own diet for ten days.
God granted them better health, wisdom, and understanding than any of the other hostages; therefore the guard allowed the five Hebrew men to continue eating the foods allowed
by their divine laws.
When Nebuchadnezzar examined those who had been in training, he declared that they were superior to the magicians and enchanters who belonged to the royal court. This was
the first of a series of events in which the captives who committed themselves fully to their God triumphed over all the pagan leaders of two empires.
Biblegatway.com
February 1 , 2015
DANIEL 1:5, 8–17, MATTHEW 6:16–18
Asbury Bible Commentary » Part III: The New Testament » MATTHEW
Requirements of the kingdom: Piety (6:1-18)
Jesus now turns his attention to the implications of the kingdom of God for piety. The passage begins with a general warning regarding practicing piety
with an eye toward human recognition and approval (v. 1). Jesus then expands upon this warning by discussing three forms of piety that were especially
prominent in Judaism: almsgiving (vv. 2-4), prayer (vv. 5-15), and fasting (vv. 16-18).
The structure of these three passages is strikingly uniform. Each begins with the negative admonition, “Do not look somber as the hypocrites do,” who
perform acts of piety in order to receive praise from humans. Jesus gives the reason for this admonition: Those who practice piety for the praise of
humans can expect no reward from the heavenly Father. Jesus then contrasts the negative admonition with a positive command: Disciples should be
careful to perform their pious acts in private, for only in so doing can they be sure that God will see and reward.
.
Biblegatway.com
February 1 , 2015
DANIEL 1:5, 8–17, MATTHEW 6:16–18
Asbury Bible Commentary » Part III: The New Testament » MATTHEW
Requirements of the kingdom: Piety (6:1-18) con’t.
By repeating the same elements in all three examples, Jesus emphasizes the following points. First, although disciples are to perform acts of piety, they
should realize that such acts are not automatically pleasing to God. The value of such acts is linked to motive. Second, the only appropriate motivation is
the desire to win the approval of God and to glorify him. These acts must be done with God, rather than humans, in mind. To practice acts of piety with
the intention of receiving human praise necessarily involves hypocrisy or contradiction between outward appearance and inner motive. Third, the desire
to receive praise from humans will result in loss of reward from God. Fourth, because the temptation to perform pious acts for human applause is so
great, disciples must do all they can to avoid giving occasion to such temptation.
Jesus' discussion about prayer in 6:7-15 is different in both form and content from the surrounding material. Here Jesus warns against the practice of the
Gentiles (v. 7) rather than the practice of hypocrites. This passage has not so much to do with the motive of prayer as with the attitude of prayer.
Effective prayer requires faith in God (6:7-8) as well as forgiveness of others (vv. 14-15). Persons who refuse to forgive others cannot expect God to
heed their pleas for forgiveness. The Lord's Prayer (vv. 9-13) models the two characteristics of effective prayer just mentioned. It also indicates that
prayer should be characterized by recognition of the holiness of God, profound desire to see the will of God accomplished, dependence on God for all
things, and simplicity.
Biblegatway.com
February 1 , 2015
DANIEL 1:5, 8–17, MATTHEW 6:16–18
Reformation Study Bible
With minor modifications
Dan 1:5 the food that the king ate. Jehoiachin later received such a provision under the rule of the Babylonian king, Evil-merodach (2 Kin. 25:27–30)
Dan 1:8 he would not defile himself. The reason for Daniel’s conclusion that he and his friends would be defiled by the king’s food is not given. Perhaps it
involved violation of the dietary laws of Moses (Lev. 11; 17).
•Babylon's moral climate was totally heathen. **
• To eat such food would have disobeyed God’s laws; to drink wine would have defiled their minds because of the intoxicating effects **
• Daniel made up his mind from the start not to defile himself, **
•He would not compromise his convictions even if it meant death. **`
•Note: Daniel no longer had his parents around to guide him in his decisions; his love for God and His laws had been instilled in him as a child that
he desired to serve the Lord from his heart. **
**Dan 1:12 Prove thy servants…ten days - Daniel and his friends were objects of the king’s special attention
•Daniel did not argue; instead, with grace and dignity he went to “the Metzar”(v.11 i.e. the steward who actually served their food) and proposed an
experimental 10 day diet.
Dan 1:15 they were better in appearance. The obedience of Daniel and his friends to God, and their refusal to compromise their faith in a heathen environment,
were rewarded with God’s blessing (cf. Deut. 8:3; Matt. 4:4).
**Dan 1:16 Melzar took away the meat and wine and gave them the pulse.
.
Dan 1:17 God gave them learning. God’s blessing was not limited to physical well-being, but also included outstanding intellectual development during their three
years of Babylonian education. visions and dreams. With a view to what follows in the book (chs. 2; 4; 5), Daniel is distinguished from his companions in his
ability to interpret dreams and visions, much as Joseph was in the court of Pharaoh (Gen. 40:8; 41:16).
**God gave them knowledge and skill in all learning and wisdom
•Because the four young men were committed to God, God committed Himself to help them.
•If you endeavoring to be faithful to God and His ways rest assured that he will remain with you and give you the help and grace needed to accomplish His
will.
Biblegatway.com
**The Full Life Study Bible 1249
February 1 , 2015
DANIEL 1:5, 8–17, MATTHEW 6:16–18
6:16 When ye fast- In the Bible fasting refers to the discipline of abstaining from food for spiritual purposes. Although it often linked with prayer. It should be
considered a spiritual exercise of its own. In fact, fasting can be called “prayer without words”
•There are 3 main forms of fasting presented in the Bible
•Normal fast: abstaining from all food, solid or liquid, but not from water
•Absolute fast: abstaining from both food and water (Esth 4:16, Acts 9:9)
•Partial fast: a restriction diet rather than complete abstention (Daniel 10:3)
•Christ Himself practiced this discipline and taught that it was to be a part of Christina devotion and an act of preparation for His return. The N.T. church practiced
fasting (Acts 13:2-3; 14:23; 27:33)
•Fasting with prayer has several purposes ;
•To honor God (vv. 16-18, Zech. 7:5,; Luke 2:37; Acts 13:2)
•To humble one’s soul before God (Ezra 8:21; Ps. 69:10; Is.58:3) in order to receive more grace (I.Pet.5-5) and God’s close presence (Is. 57:55; 58:6-9)
•To mourn over personal sin and failure (I Sam 7:6; Neh. 9;1-2)
•To mourn over the sins of the church, the nation and world (I Sam 7:6; Neh. 9;1-2)
•To seek grace for a new task and to reaffirm our consecration to God (4:2)
•To seek God by drawing near to Him and prevailing in prayer against opposing spiritual forces ( Judg. 20:26, Ezra 8:21, 23, 31;jer. 29; 12-14; Joel 2:12; Luke 18:3;
Acts 9:10-19;
•To show repentance and so make a way for God to change His declared intentions of judgment (2 Sam. 12; 16,22; I Ki.. 21:27-29; Jer. 18:7-8; Joel: 12-14; Jonah
3:5,10
•To save souls from the bondage of evil (Is. 58:6; )Mat 17:14-21; Luke 4:18)
•To gain revelation, wisdom, and understanding concerning the will of God (Is. 58:5-6, 11; Dan. 93, 21-22, Acts 13:2-3)
•To open the way for the outpouring of the Spirit and Christ’s return to earth for His people.
The Full Life Study Bible pg 1411 -1412
February 1 , 2015
Points of Hope for Life Application
•The 21st church does more feasting in the church, than in fasting.
•The 21st Century believer needs to know the importance of fasting as related to their walk with Christ.
•The 21st Century believer should not wait for Wednesday or for the Pastor to call a fast.
•The 21st Century believer must make fasting & prayer a priority for maintaining and advance their Christian
growth.
•The 21st Century believer must be obedient to God’s laws than succumb to threats of man.
•There are more ways to be defiled than what is eaten, the student learner, should apply the principle of the
lesson to ever area in their life which is being defiled
February 8 , 2015
Serving Neighbors, Serving God
Bible Background • LUKE 10:25–34
Printed Text • LUKE 10:25–34
Devotional Reading • MATTHEW 22:33–40
Definitions
Serving – helping, assist, lend a hand, be of assistance, rally round, minister to, support, assist
Neighbors– fellow human, somebody living nearby, somebody nearby
Dictionary.com says that it can also mean
•One's fellow human being: to be generous toward one's less fortunate neighbors.
•A person who shows kindliness or helpfulness toward his or her fellow humans: to be a neighbor to someone in distress
“Which now of these three, thinkest thou, was neighbour unto him that fell among the
thieves? And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him, Go, and
do thou likewise” (Luke 10:36–37).
LESSON AIM
By the end of the lesson, we will: EXAMINE Jesus’ teaching about compassion for our neighbors; REFLECT on the connection between
serving our neighbors and serving God; and EXPAND our vision and application of service to neighbors and to God.
Lady Vivian Finnell/Christ Temple Apostolic Faith Assembly, Indianapolis, IN
February 8, 2015
St. Luke:
BACKGROUND
Luke’s Gospel is the first of two books addressed to a man named Theophilus (1:2; Acts 1:1). Although the author is not identified by name in either book, the
unanimous testimony of early Christianity and the corroborating internal evidence o9f the two books point to common authorship by Luke.
Apparently Luke was a Gentile covert, the only non-Jewish author of a Bible Book. The Holy Spirit prompted him to write to Theophilus (whose name means “one
who loves God”) in order to fill a need in the Gentile church for a full account of the beginning of Christianity. This included two parts (1) Jesus’ birth, life and
ministry , death, resurrection, and ascension (Luke’s Gospel) , and (2) the outpouring of the Spirit at Jerusalem and the subsequent development of the early church
(book of Acts). These two books comprise more than one-fourth of the N. T.
From Paul’s letters we lean that Luke was a “beloved physician” (Col 4:14) and a loyal co-worker with Paul. From Luke’s own writings we know he was welleducated, a skilled writer, a careful historian, and an inspired theologian. When he wrote his Gospel, the Gentile church apparently had no completed or widely
circulated Gospel about Jesus. Mathew wrote initially to the Jews, and Mark wrote a concise Gospel for the church in Rome. The Greek –speaking Gentile world did
have oral accounts about Jesus by eyewitnesses, as well as short written digests, but no complete and orderly Gospel. Thus Luke set about to investigate everything
carefully “from the very first” (1:3), probably doing research in Palestine while Paul as in prison at Caesarea (Acts 21:17; 23:23-26:32) and completing his Gospel
toward the end of that time or soon after arriving in Rome with Paul (Acts 28:16)
Luke wrote this Gospel to the Gentiles to provide4 a full and accurate3 record “of all that Jesus began both to do and teach. In Luke, Jesus is clearly seen as
the divine –human Savior who came as God’s provision of salvation for all of Adam’s descendants.
FULL LIFE STUDY BIBLE/KJV pg 1519
February 8, 2015
St. Luke : SURVEY
Luke’s Gospel :
•Begins with the most complete infancy narratives (1:5-2:40)
•Gives the only glimpse in the Gospels of Jesus boyhood (2:41-5:52)
After describing John the Baptist’s ministry and giving the genealogy of Jesus, Luke divides Jesus ministry into three major sections
1. His ministry in and around Galilee (4:14-9:50)
2. His ministry during the final journey to Jerusalem (9:51-19:27)
3. His last week in Jerusalem (19:28-24:43)
While Jesus’ miracles are prominent in Luke’s record of His Galilean ministry, the main focus in this Gospel is on Jesus' teaching and parables during His extended ministry on
the way to Jerusalem (9:51-19”27). This section comprises the greatest block of material unique to Luke, and includes many well –loved stories and parable, The pivotal verse
(9:51)and the key verse (19:10) of the Gospel occur at the beginning and toward the end of this special Lukan material.
Special Features of Luke:
Eight major features or emphases characterize Luke’s Gospel:
1) It is the most comprehensive Gospel, recording events in Jesus’ life from pre-birth to His ascension , and is the longest book in the N.T.
2) It is the most literacy of the Gospel, demonstrating exceptional style and content, a rich vocabulary, and excellent command of Greek..
3) It emphasizes the universal scope of the gospel, that Jesus came to bring salvation for Jews and Gentiles alike..
4) It stresses Jesus’ concern for the underprivileged, including women, children, the poor, and social outcast.
5) It emphasizes Jesus’ prayer life and His teaching about prayer.
6) The prominent title for Jesus in this Gospel is “Son of man”.
7) The response of joy characterizes those who accept Jesus and His messages.
8) The Holy Spirit is given a place of prominence and importance in the life of Jesus and of His people .
FULL LIFE STUDY BIBLE/KJV pg 1520
February 8 , 2015
LUKE 10:25–34
Reformation Study Bible
10:25 lawyer. An expert in the law of God, and so a religious man. Yet he was not genuinely looking for information but for something that would enable him to accuse Jesus.
10:27 The lawyer showed insight; Jesus summed up the law in much the same way (Matt. 22:37–40).
10:28 do this. God’s will is the way of life.
10:29–37 The parable answers the question “Who is my neighbor,” not the question concerning what one must do to be saved. The Jews had various ideas about the “neighbor,”
but they confined it to Israel. ONLINE DICTIONARY: Neighbor defined: The Hebrew generally refers not so much to a "friend" as to "another member of the community"; and
the specifically Christian twist on this is that we're all members of the same community.
.
Biblegatway.com
February 8 , 2015
LUKE 10:25–34
The IVP New Testament Commentary Series Discipleship: Looking to Our Neighbor, to Jesus and to God
The Parable of the Good Samaritan
One of the most abstract, but important, questions we can wrestle with is the goal of life. Humankind has struggled with this question throughout its history.
In this passage a theist asks Jesus how one can inherit eternal life. This Jewish lawyer knows that God exists and that he is accountable to that God, so his question is particularly
focused:"Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?" If God exists, then the goal of life must be related to his purpose for us.
The lawyer seems focused on this last possibility. He assumes that he must do something to gain life everlasting. In effect he asks how he can be sure to participate in and be blessed
at the resurrection of the dead. Jewish scribes would have great interest in such questions, not only for personal reasons but because they were interested in interpreting the law for the
community.
The lawyer's question seems to assume that he must earn such a reward, though when Jesus probes him we see that he knows that works are not the issue. Jesus calls for reflection
on the law, asking, "What is written in the Law? How do you read it?" He is asking for scriptural support.
The lawyer responds well (v. 28) by citing Deuteronomy 6:5, a text that has become known as the "great commandment": "Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with
all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind"; and, "Love your neighbor as yourself." This text could well be called "the law of love." The reply shows that
the issue is not action per se but the heart. Do I love God fully? That is the starting point. Everything else grows out from that relationship
This is a relationship of trust and devotion, a truth that lies at the heart of Jesus' reply and explains why Jesus' approval is not an endorsement of works righteousness. When
Jesus says, "Do this and you will live," he is saying that relationship to God is what gives life. The chief end of humankind is to love God wholly. We were designed to love; but
to love well, we must love the right person. Here is the definition of life that brings life. And the product of our love for God will be a regard for others made in his image, those
whom God has placed next to us as neighbors. The New Testament often connects one's relationship to God to one's response to others (Mt 5:43; 19:19; Jn 13:34-35; 15:8-12; Gal
5:14; Col 1:3-5; 1 Thess 1:1; Philem 6; Jas 2:8; 1 Pet 2:17; 1 Jn 4:11). To respond to the law means to love God. To live by the Spirit means to love and do righteousness (Rom 8:111).
Biblegatway.com
February 8 , 2015
LUKE 10:25–34
The IVP New Testament Commentary Series Discipleship: Looking to Our Neighbor, to Jesus and to God
The Parable of the Good Samaritan
The lawyer is confused, even though his answer is correct, because he still thinks that eternal life is earned rather than received in the context of a love relationship with God. It is
also important to set this discussion in its context. Jesus has just said that to know the Father one must know the Son (vv. 21-24). So to love the Father will also mean to love Jesus. If
Jesus brings the kingdom message, then he must be heeded as well. This is why 1 Corinthians 2:9 describes believers in Christ as those who love God.
But the lawyer latches on to the second part of the reply about one's neighbor. Exactly where does his responsibility fall? Does it have limits? Luke is clear that the lawyer has
not understood the thrust of Jesus' reply, for he notes that the lawyer is seeking to justify himself by his next question. The question Who is my neighbor? is really an attempt to limit
who one's neighbor might be. In ancient culture, as today, such limits might have run along ethnic lines. There was a category of "nonneighbor," and the lawyer is seeking Jesus'
endorsement of that concept. In contemporary terms, any of various forms of racism may underlie the scribe's question: there are neighbors, "my folk," and then there are the rest,
"them." Perhaps the lawyer could appeal to a text like Leviticus 19:16 for support: my concern is for "my people.“
Jesus' reply not only challenges the premise but brings a shocking surprise: each of us is to be a neighbor and realize that neighbors can come from surprising places. Jesus' words
reflect Leviticus 19:33-34: even "sojourners" deserve love. In addition, the ethic of Hosea 6:6 seems reflected here.
The original impact of the parable of the good Samaritan is generally lost today. After centuries of good biblical public relations, our understanding of a Samaritan as a positive
figure is almost a cultural given. But in the original setting, to a Jewish scribe a Samaritan would have been the exact opposite, a notorious "bad guy" and traitor.
Biblegatway.com
February 8 , 2015
LUKE 10:25–34
The IVP New Testament Commentary Series Discipleship: Looking to Our Neighbor, to Jesus and to God
The Parable of the Good Samaritan con’t
Jesus' question to close the story requires no brilliant reply: "Which of these three do you think was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?"
The lawyer knows, but he cannot even bring himself to mention the man's race. The lawyer is choosy about his neighbors. He does not understand the call of God. Nevertheless,
he answers, "The one who had mercy on him."
This reply is correct, so Jesus simply says, "Go and do likewise."
Jesus' point is,
• Simply be a neighbor.
• Do not rule out certain people as neighbors.
•And his parable makes the point emphatically by providing a model from a group the lawyer had probably excluded as possible neighbors.
•To love God means to show mercy to those in need.
•An authentic life is found in serving God and caring for others.
•This is a central tenet of discipleship.
•Here human beings fulfill their created role—to love God and be a neighbor to others by meeting their needs.
•Neighbors are not determined by race, creed or gender;
• Neighbors consist of anyone in need made in the image of God.
Biblegatway.com
February 8 , 2015
Points of Hope for Life Application
•The 21st church , as the lawyer in the lesson, should adopt the following:
•Simply be a neighbor.
• Do not rule out certain people as neighbors.
•And his parable makes the point emphatically by providing a model from a group the lawyer had probably excluded as possible neighbors.
•To love God means to show mercy to those in need.
•An authentic life is found in serving God and caring for others.
•This is a central tenet of discipleship.
•Here human beings fulfill their created role—to love God and be a neighbor to others by meeting their needs.
•Neighbors are not determined by race, creed or gender;
• Neighbors consist of anyone in need made in the image of God.
•The 21st Century believer has the same commandment "Go and do likewise." for the child of God is required to love all people, including their enemies.
•Even the enemy in me- the lack of healthy self love
February 15 , 2015
Serving the Least
Bible Background • MATTHEW 25:31–46
Printed Text • MATTHEW 25:31–46
Devotional Reading • PSALM 10:12–18
Definitions
Serving – helping, assist, lend a hand, be of assistance, rally round, minister to, support, assist
Least– lowest
“And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as
ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me”
(Matthew 25:40).
LESSON AIM
By the end of the lesson, we will: UNDERSTAND Jesus’ comments on our obligation to meet the needs of the less fortunate; EXPERIENCE how
God’s love for all inspires us to meet others’ needs; and PARTICIPATE in serving the needs of others.
Lady Vivian Finnell/Christ Temple Apostolic Faith Assembly, Indianapolis, IN
February 15 , 2015
MATTHEW 25:31–46
The IVP New Testament Commentary Series The Division of the Sheep and the Goats
This final parable in Jesus' final sermon in Matthew brings home the reality of judgment. As the missionaries from Matthew's churches spread the good news of the kingdom
both among fellow Jews and among Gentiles, they faced hostility as well as welcome. This parable brings together some themes from the rest of the Gospel: Christ, like the
kingdom, had been present in a hidden way (compare chap. 13), and one's response to his agents represented one's response to him (chap. 10).
Jesus is the judge on the day of judgment. Jesus is both judge and the focus of the final judgment, spelling disaster to those who ignored him on this side of that day.
The nations will be judged according to how they respond to the gospel and its messengers. The nations or "Gentiles" in Jewish literature would be judged according to
how they treated Israel (4 Ezra 7:37; Klausner 1979:200). As in other parables, here they are gathered(compare 13:40; Is 2:4; Rev 16:16) and separated (Mt 13:30, 49), in this
instance the way a shepherd would separate sheep from goats (compare Ezek 34:17), to keep the goats warm at night while keeping the sheep in open air as they preferred
(Jeremias 1972:206). Sheep cost more than goats (Jeremias 1972:206) and because of their greater utility and value were nearly always more numerous on a farm (N. Lewis
1983:131-32).
The King thus judges the nations based on how they have responded to the gospel of the kingdom already preached to them before the time of his kingdom (Mt 24:14; 28:19-20).
The passage thus also implies that true messengers of the gospel will successfully evangelize the world only if they can also embrace poverty and suffering for Christ's name
(compare Matthey 1980).
The stakes involved in our witness are eternal. The horrifying conclusion (25:46) is the damnation of people who did not actively embrace messengers of the gospel but
nevertheless were oblivious to how they had offended God. The goats thus depart (7:23) into eternal fire (the worst possible conception of hell; see comment on 3:8, 10, 12), but
tragically, God had not originally created them for the fire or the fire for them (compare 4 Ezra 8:59-60). Rather, it had been prepared (compare Mt 25:34) by God for the devil
and his angels (compare 2 Pet 2:4; 1QM 13.11-12).
Biblegatway.com
February 15 , 2015
MATTHEW 25:31–46
Reformation Study Bible & **Matthew Henry Commentary
25:31 Son of Man. The placing of the judge upon the judgment-seat. When the Son of man shall come.
**That there is a judgment to come, in which every man shall be sentenced to a state of everlasting happiness, or misery, in the world of recompense or retribution,
according to what he did in this world of trial and probation, which is to be judged of by the rule of the everlasting gospel.
25:32 sheep. The image of Christ’s people as sheep is found in Ezek. 34 and is a part of Jesus’ teaching (10:16; 18:12). The division concerns individuals, not nations.
** The judgment of the great day will be a general judgment. All must be summoned before Christ’s tribunal; all of every age of the world, from the beginning to the
end of time; all of every place on earth, even from the remotest corners of the world, most obscure, and distant from each other; all nations, all those nations of men
that are made of one blood, to dwell on all the face of the earth.
**The appearing of all the children of men before him (Matt. 25:32); Before him shall be gathered all nations. The distinction that will then be made between
the precious and the vile; He shall separate them one from another, as the tares and wheat are separated at the harvest, the good fish and the bad at the shore, the corn
and chaff in the floor. Wicked and godly here dwell together in the same kingdoms, cities, churches, families, and are not certainly distinguishable one from
another; such are the infirmities of saints, such the hypocrisies of sinners, and one event to both: but in that day they will be separated, and parted for
ever; Then shall ye return, and discern between the righteous and the wicked, Mal. 3:18. They cannot separate themselves one from another in this world (1 Cor.
5:10), nor can any one else separate them (Matt. 13:29); but the Lord knows them that are his, and he can separate them.
Biblegatway.com
February 15 , 2015
MATTHEW 25:31–46
Reformation Study Bible & **Matthew Henry Commentary
25:33 **The godly are like sheep—innocent, mild, patient, useful: the wicked are like goats, a baser kind of animal, unsavory and unruly. The sheep and goats
are here feeding all day in the same pasture, but will be coted at night in different folds. Being thus divided, he will set the sheep on his right hand, and the goats on his
left, Matt. 25:33. Christ puts honour upon the godly, as we show respect to those we set on our right hand; but the wicked shall rise to everlasting shame, Dan. 12:2.
All other divisions and subdivisions will then be abolished; but the great distinction of men into saints and sinners, sanctified and unsanctified, will remain for
ever, and men’s eternal state will be determined by it. The wicked took up with left-handed blessings, riches and honour, and so shall their doom be.
25:34 The righteous will be rewarded **The admission of the saints into the blessedness and kingdom of the Father; Inherit the kingdom prepared for you. The
happiness they shall be possessed of is very rich; we are told what it is by him who had reason to know it, having purchased it for them, and possessed it himself.
** It is a kingdom; which is reckoned the most valuable possession on earth, and includes the greatest wealth and honour. Those that inherit kingdoms, wear all the
glories of the crown, enjoy all the pleasures of the court, and command the peculiar treasures of the provinces; yet this is but a faint resemblance of the felicities of the
saints in heaven.
** It is a kingdom prepared: the happiness must needs be great, for it is the product of the divine counsels. Note, There is great preparation made for the saints in
the kingdom of glory. The Father designed it for them in his thoughts of love, and provided it for them in the greatness of his wisdom and power. The Son
purchased it for them, and is entered as the fore-runner to prepare a place, John 14:2. And the blessed Spirit, in preparing them for the kingdom, in effect, is preparing it
for them.
Biblegatway.com
February 15 , 2015
MATTHEW 25:31–46
Reformation Study Bible & **Matthew Henry Commentary
25:34 The righteous will be rewarded con’t
** It is prepared for them. It is prepared on purpose for them; not only for such as you, but for you, you by name, you personally and particularly, who were chosen to
salvation through sanctification.
**It is prepared from the foundation of the world . This happiness was designed for the saints, and they for it, before time began, from all eternity, Eph. 1:4.
** 25:35, 36), For I was an hungered, and ye gave me meat. We cannot hence infer that any good words of ours merit the happiness of heaven, by any intrinsic worth
or excellency in them: our goodness extends not unto God; but it is plain that Jesus Christ will judge the world by the same rule by which he governs it, and
therefore will reward those that have been obedient to that law; and mention will be made of their obedience, not as their title, but as their evidence of an interest in
Christ, and his purchase.
** Matt. 25:37-39. is questioned by the righteous, Not as if they were loth to inherit the kingdom, or were ashamed of their good deeds, or had not the testimony
of their own consciences concerning them: but, (1.) The expressions are paradoxical, designed to introduce and impress these great truths, that Christ has a mighty
regard to works of charity, and is especially pleased with kindnesses done to his people for his sake. (2) Gracious souls are apt to think meanly of their own good deeds;
especially as unworthy to be compared with the glory that shall be revealed.
•“When saw we thee an hungered? We have seen the poor in distress many a time; but when saw we thee?” Note, Christ is more among us than we think he is;
surely the Lord is in this place, by his word, his ordinances, his ministers, his Spirit, yea, and his poor, and we know it not.:
Biblegatway.com
February 15 , 2015
MATTHEW 25:31–46
Reformation Study Bible & **Matthew Henry Commentary
25:40 the least of these my brothers. Christ’s disciples (10:42; 12:48, 49; 18:14), not the poor and needy in general. The judgment of the nations depends on how they
respond to Christians and to the gospel (10:40–42), not only because it is through the testimony of Christians that the Gentiles can hear and believe (Rom. 10:14), but also
because Christ identifies with His people. Their suffering is His suffering, and compassion shown to them is compassion shown to Him
** vs.37-39 - explained by the Judge himself (Matt. 25:40); Inasmuch as ye have done it to these my brethren, to the least, to one of the least of them, ye have done it unto me.
The good works of the saints, when they are produced in the great day\
• If Christ himself were among us in poverty, how readily would we relieve him? In prison, how frequently would we visit him? We are ready to envy the honour they
had, who ministered to him of their substance, Luke 8:3. Wherever poor saints and poor ministers are, there Christ is ready to receive our kindnesses in them, and they
shall be put to his account.
Mt 25:41 The ungodly will be punished
** The sentence passed upon them, Matt. 5:41. It was a disgrace to be set on the left hand; but that is not the worst of it, he shall say to them, Depart from me, ye cursed. Every
word has terror in it, like that of the trumpet at mount Sinai, waxing louder and louder, every accent more and more doleful, and exclusive of comfort
•. The reason of this sentence assigned. God’s judgments are all just, and he will be justified in them. He is Judge himself, and therefore the heavens shall declare
his righteousness.
Biblegatway.com
February 15 , 2015
MATTHEW 25:31–46
Reformation Study Bible & **Matthew Henry Commentary
**25:44 Lord, when saw we thee an hungered, or athirst? Condemned sinners, though they have no plea that will bear them out, will yet in vain offer at excuses. Now. 1. The
manner of their pleading bespeaks their present precipitation. They cut it short, as men in haste; when saw we thee hungry, or thirsty, or naked? They care not to repeat the
charge, as conscious to themselves of their own guilt, and unable to bear the terrors of the judgment. Nor will they have time allowed them to insist upon such frivolous pleas; for
it is all (as we say) but “trifling with the court.” 2. The matter of their plea bespeaks their former inconsideration of that which they might have known, but would not till now
that it was too late. They that had slighted and persecuted poor Christians, would not own that they had slighted and persecuted Christ: no, they never intended any affront to
him, nor expected that so great a matter would have been made of it. They imagined it was only a company of poor, weak, silly, and contemptible people, who made more ado
than needed about religion, that they put those slights upon; but they who do so, will be made to know, either in the day of their conversion, as Paul, or of their condemnation, as
these here, that it was Jesus whom they persecuted. And, if they say, Behold, we knew it not: doth not he that pondereth the heart consider it? Prov. 24:11, 12.
** 25:45 He goes by this rule Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least of these, ye did it not to me. Note, What is done against the faithful disciples and followers of
Christ, even the least of them, he takes as done against himself. He is reproached and persecuted in them, for they are reproached and persecuted for his sake, and in all their
afflictions he is afflicted. He that touches them, touches him in a part no less tender than the apple of his eye.
25:46 eternal punishment. -. Two eternal destinies ** Lastly, Here is the execution of both these sentences, Matt. 25:46. Execution is the life of the law, and Christ will
take care that that be done according to the sentence.1. The wicked shall go away into everlasting punishment. Sentence will then be executed speedily, and no reprieve
granted, nor any time allowed to move in arrest of judgment. The execution of the wicked is first mentioned; for first the tares are gathered and burned. The righteous shall go
away into life eternal; that is, they shall inherit the kingdom, Matt. 25:34. Note, (1.) Heaven is life, it is all happiness. The life of the soul results from its union with God by
the mediation of Jesus Christ, as that of the body from its union with the soul by the animal spirits
Biblegatway.com
February 15, 2015
Points of Hope for Life Application
•The 21st Century church must be more concerned about outreach than in reach (ie Women & Men’s day programs, anniversaries, etc.)
•The 21st Century believer will have to remember what God instructed about the care and response to the “least” in our communities. We will be help
responsible for how we respond (verbally, emotionally and mentally) to the homeless, the mentally ill, those suffering in abusive situations, and those
who have no hope.
•The 21st Century believer will need to find opportunities to volunteer at shelters (homeless and DV), hospital nurseries holding and rocking failure to
thrive or addite4d babies who have been left to die, nursing homes reading and being company to the elderly, youth centers/youth organizations, jail
ministries and other opportunities to serve.
February 22 , 2015
Clothed and Ready
Bible Background • EPHESIANS 6:10–20
Printed Text • EPHESIANS 6:10–20
Devotional Reading • COLOSSIANS 3:12–17
Definitions
Clothed – draped, mantled, wrapped, covered
Ready– prepared, set, standing by, equipped, willing
“Put on the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the
devil” (Ephesians 6:11).
LESSON AIM
By the end of the lesson, we will: EXAMINE the epistle’s teaching to put on the whole armor of God; VALUE the feeling of being prepared to serve
God; and ARM ourselves with those character traits needed to best serve God.
Lady Vivian Finnell/Christ Temple Apostolic Faith Assembly, Indianapolis, IN
February 22, 2015
Ephesians:
BACKGROUND
Ephesians is one of the mountain piece of Biblical revelation and has a unique place among Paul’s letters. Ephesians conveys the impression of a rich overflow of revelation
growing our of Paul’s personal prayer life.
•Wrote the letter while a prisoner on behalf of Christ., most likely at Rome.
•Ephesians has a numerous affinities with Colossians and probably was penned after Colossians.
•Commonly believed that Paul wrote Ephesians with wider readership than just the church at Ephesus- perhaps intending for it to be a circular letter for churches throughout the
province of Asia.. Each church could insert their name in 1:1, testifying to the intense relevance of its profound message for all true church of Jesus Christ.
•PURPOSE: See 1:15-17 for the implied immediate purpose
•Paul prayerfully longs for his readers to advance in faith, love, wisdom and revelation of the Father of glory.
•He earnestly desired them to live a life worthy of the Lord Jesus Christ (e.g. 4:1-3; 5:1-2)
•Therefore he seeks to strengthen their faith and spiritual foundation by revealing the fullness of God’s eternal purpose of redemption. “in Christ” for the church.
•Key Phrase: “In Christ”
**In this chapter, I. The apostle proceeds in the exhortation to relative duties which he began in the former, particularly he insists on the duties of children and parents, and of
servants and masters, Eph. 6:1-9. II. He exhorts and directs Christians how to behave themselves in the spiritual warfare with the enemies of their souls; and to the exercise of
several Christian graces, which he proposes to them as so many pieces of spiritual amour, to preserve and defend them in the conflict, Eph. 6:10-18. III. We have here the
conclusion of the epistle, in which he takes his leave of them, recommending himself to the prayers of the believing Ephesians, and praying for them, Eph. 6:19-24.
FULL LIFE STUDY BIBLE/KJV pg 1843 ;**Mathew Henry Commentary/Biblegateway.com
February 22 , 2015
EPHESIANS 6:10–20
Reformation Study Bible
6:10–17 The Christian duty of unity and purity is complicated by the presence of hostile spiritual powers. Christ’s cross and resurrection are the devil’s
undoing (Col. 2:15 note), and at Christ’s Second Coming, Satan’s defeat will be completed (Rom. 16:20). But the peace of the Cross is experienced in the
meantime in the midst of spiritual struggle. The forces of darkness are defeated, but not yet harmless.
6:10 be strong . . . the strength of his might. Paul uses similar terms in 1:19 to describe the power that raised Jesus from the dead. We are not encouraged to
face the evil hosts of darkness in our own strength, but in the strength that raised Jesus and believers with Him (2:4–6; 3:16–19).
6:11 Put on the whole armor of God. The new set of clothes (4:22–24 note) now becomes a warrior’s battle gear (Col. 3:10, 12 notes).
stand. Repeated three times in vv. 11, 13, 14 (the related term “withstand” in v. 13 has the same meaning). The “walking” image of chs. 4 and 5 (4:1 note)
gives way to the picture of a soldier standing firm in battle.
6:12 See 1:21; 2:2; 3:10.
rulers . . . spiritual forces. These terms all refer to powerful spiritual beings that make up the “power of the air” (2:2) ruled by satan.
darkness. See 5:8–14.
6:13 the whole armor of God. Paul combines the weapons of a Roman foot soldier with a number of Old Testament images of God, or the Messiah, as
a warrior. Strikingly, what is said of God and the Messiah in the Old Testament is applied to believers
Biblegatway.com
February 22 , 2015
EPHESIANS 6:10–20
Reformation Study Bible
6:14 fastened . . . truth. The Roman soldier’s leather belt supported and protected his lower abdomen, gathered his tunic together, and held his sword. Paul
seems to have in mind the confidence that comes from certainty about the truthfulness of God’s Word.
breastplate of righteousness. Believers are protected by the righteousness of Christ imputed to them (Rom. 4:6–11; Phil. 3:9), and they can stand up to the
accusations of the devil in Greek means “slanderer” (Rom. 8:31–34). Simultaneously, Paul sees believers taking on the righteous character of Christ (4:25;
5:9), while their growing conformity to His image gives them confidence in resisting temptation.
6:15 shoes for your feet. Despite a clear allusion to Is. 52:7, Paul does not have in mind the barefooted messenger who takes the gospel to others. The image
here is of the Roman soldier’s sturdy sandals, which gave him stability and protection in battle. Ironically, the peace that comes from the gospel readies one for
war against evil (2:14, 15, 17).
6:16 shield of faith. The Roman shield was large enough to cover the whole body; it was made of wood, covered with hide, and bound with iron at the top and
bottom. When dipped in water before a battle, it could extinguish fire arrows that had been dipped in pitch and set ablaze.
6:17 helmet of salvation. For Paul, salvation is a present experience (2:8 and note) as well as a future hope (1 Thess. 5:8). The believer’s final ground of
confidence is the faithfulness of God to complete the salvation He has begun (Phil. 1:6).
sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God. The one offensive weapon in the believer’s arsenal is compared to the Roman sword, short and designed for
hand-to-hand combat. See Jesus’ use of Scripture in Matt. 4:1–11; Luke 4:1–13.
6:18–20 The battle theme in this passage ends with an urgent call to militant prayer on behalf of all believers and on behalf of Paul’s ministry. See 1:15–
23 for Paul’s dependence on prayer.
Biblegatway.com
February 22, 2015
Points of Hope for Life Application
•The 21st Century church leadership has a responsibility to teach and train the believers about the necessity about being clothed with the whole armour of
God.
•The 21st Century believer is responsible for ensuring they are prepared for the adversary by having all areas of their lives wrapped and covered in the Word
of God
•The 21st Century church leadership must exemplify the character traits which the scripture calls for to prepare their self and those under their direction.
•.The 21st Century believer is responsible for equipping their self to be servants of God and to serve others .
February 22 , 2015
Clothed and Ready
Bible Background • EPHESIANS 6:10–20
Printed Text • EPHESIANS 6:10–20
Devotional Reading • COLOSSIANS 3:12–17
Definitions
Clothed – draped, mantled, wrapped, covered
Ready– prepared, set, standing by, equipped, willing
“Put on the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the
devil” (Ephesians 6:11).
LESSON AIM
By the end of the lesson, we will: EXAMINE the epistle’s teaching to put on the whole armor of God; VALUE the feeling of being prepared to serve
God; and ARM ourselves with those character traits needed to best serve God.
Lady Vivian Finnell/Christ Temple Apostolic Faith Assembly, Indianapolis, IN
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