Let’s Get Creative!
Solving the Assessment Puzzle
How do we
create
them?
What are
rubrics?
Why we should use them?
Effective Rubrics



Help guide student work
Help teachers assess
student products
Help teachers develop
classroom instructional
activities
Creation Concerns



Creation takes time
Must evaluate the
instrument
Must consider all
stakeholders
Two basic types
 Holistic
 Analytic
Experts say Rubrics are:
Scoring Guides with specific pre-established
performance criteria
(Mertler, 2001).
Analytic Rubrics



Most commonly used
(Mueler, 2006).
Teacher scores individual parts
Sums individual scores to obtain total
(Moskal,2000; Mertler, 2001).
Table 2:
Template for analytic rubrics
Beginning
1
Developing
2
Accomplished
3
Exemplary
4
Criteria #1
Description
reflecting
beginning
level of
performance
Description
reflecting
movement
toward
mastery level
of
performance
Description
reflecting
achievement
of mastery
level of
performance
Description
reflecting
highest level of
performance
Criteria #2
Description
reflecting
beginning
level of
performance
Description
reflecting
movement
toward
mastery level
of
performance
Description
reflecting
achievement
of mastery
level of
performance
Description
reflecting
highest level of
performance
Criteria #3
Description
reflecting
beginning
level of
performance
Description
reflecting
movement
toward
mastery level
of
performance
Description
reflecting
achievement
of mastery
level of
performance
Description
reflecting
highest level of
performance
Criteria #4
Description
reflecting
beginning
level of
performance
Description
reflecting
movement
toward
mastery level
of
performance
Description
reflecting
achievement
of mastery
level of
performance
Description
reflecting
highest level of
perform
Score
Holistic Rubrics





Not as common
Teacher scores the overall process or product as a whole
Does not judge components separately
“Usually used to make quick judgments on smaller tasks such as
homework” Its best to use only a few judgments with a holistic
rubric.
Exp. Score using 1-5 or Satisfactory, Unsatisfactory, or
Unattempted
(Mertler, 2001)
Sample Holistic Rubric
Table 1:
Template for Holistic Rubrics
Score
Description
5
Demonstrates complete understanding of the problem. All requirements of task
are included in response.
4
Demonstrates considerable understanding of the problem. All requirements of
task are included.
3
Demonstrates partial understanding of the problem. Most requirements of task
are included.
2
Demonstrates little understanding of the problem. Many requirements of task
are missing.
1
Demonstrates no understanding of the problem.
0
No response/task not attempted.
Benefits of Rubrics
Teachers:
 rubrics serve as justification for grades.
 rubrics break down grading criteria to make
grading easier for the teacher.
Students:
 rubrics explain the teacher’s expectations for
the assignment.
 rubrics provide feedback to the student.
Steps to Creating the Rubric
1. Look at models.
2. List criteria.
3. Pack and Unpack Criteria.
4. Articulate levels of quality.
5. Create a draft rubric.
6. Revise the draft rubric.
(Andrade, 2000)
Evaluating Your Creation




Ask a fellow teacher to review the rubric for
overlapping, and unclear descriptors.
Ask a fellow teacher to grade a sample with the
rubric and see if your scores are similar.
Ask the students that used the rubric if it was clear
and easy to understand.
Ask students to explain their grade to you. What
needs work? What went well? If they can do all of
this, the rubric did its job.
Evaluation Criteria from Popham
Rule 1:
The skills covered by this rubric are
significant.
Rule 2:
All of the rubric’s evaluative criteria
can be addressed instructionally.
Rule 3:
The rubric employs as few evaluative
criteria as possible.
Rule 4:
The rubric provides a succinct label
for each evaluative criterion.
Rule 5:
The length of the rubric matches your
own tolerance for detail.
Rule 6:
Do you agree with the maximum
score?
Rule 7:
Would you use this rubric again on a
similar assignment?
How to improve the rubric




Must adhere to Popham’s seven rules for
effectiveness
Must be connected to the skills being addressed by
the learning targets of the subject
The skills measured on the rubric must be those that
can be addressed instructionally
The length of the rubric should be limited to as few
criteria as possible
Conclusions




Rubrics can benefit teachers and students.
There are different types of rubrics for
different types of assessments.
Rubrics can be revised and edited to fit
multiple assessments.
They get easier to make with practice.
Journey Into Cyberspace



Authentic Assessment Toolbox
http://ozpk.tripod.com/01rubric
Rubistar
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php
A collection of rubric sites
http://www.tnellen.com/cybereng/38.html#rubrics
Get Creative
With your team, investigate the lesson
plans and rubric sites to develop your
unit of study.
 Lesson Plan Search
http://www.lessonplansearch.com/Rubrics/

Resources
Andrade, Heidi Goodrich. (2000)Using rubrics to promote thinking and learning.
Retrieved February 23, 2006 from ASCD website:
http://ascd.org/readingroom/edlead/0002/andrade.html
Mertler, Craig A. (2001). Designing scoring rubrics for your classroom. Practical
Assessment Research & Evaluation, 7(25). Retrieved March 13, 2006 from
http://pareonline.net/getvnasp?v=7&n=25
Moskal, Barbara M. & Leydens, Jon A.(2000).Scoring rubric development: validity
and reliability. Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 7(10). Retrieved
March 13, 2006 from http://pareonline.net/getvnasp?v=7&n=10
Mueller, Jon (2006) Authentic assessment toolbox. Retrieved March 13, 2006, from
http://jonathan.mueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/index.htm
Popham, W. James.(2005) Classroom Assessment. (pp.195-197) Boston: Pearson
Education, Inc.
Rubik’s cube. (2006) Retrieved April 3, 2006 from Wikipedia website:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubik's_Cube
Walvoord, Barbara & Anderson, Virginia (1998) Rubrics: Appendix A: sample
rubrics for student classroom work. TLT Group starter kit workbook. Retrieved
March 13, 2006, from The TLT Group website:
http://www.tltgroup.org/resources/flashlight/rubrics.htm
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Rubrics are Just Another Rubik