Strategy Workshop
International Training and Qualifications
Global Occupational/Industrial Hygiene
Certification Programmes (IOHA) - 2012
• 28 member organizations
• 19,569 members worldwide
• 10 recognized certification
programmes
• 7868 certified professionals
• 352 technical certificate
holders
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Australia
Canada
France
Italy
Netherlands
Norway
South Africa
Switzerland
United Kingdom
United States
Sweden
(recognized 2010)
2
The Challenges
In many western countries, the number of
occupational hygienists is static or decreasing
US Data
•
“Our Professions is not only
graying … it is poised for a
dramatic decline – U.S. and
Globally”
•
“Other safety and health
professional organizations are
competing to capture market
share”
Source: John Henshaw, AIHce 2009
Emerging Economies
Increasing need for
OESH risk management
as countries industrialise
Blind spot on chronic
& insidious risks
Limited recognition of
OH professions
Global burden from risks at work*
• 318,000 deaths due to
Chronic Obstructive Lung
Disease
• 102,000 deaths due to
lung cancers and
leukaemia
• 38,000 deaths due to
asthma
• 30,000 deaths due to
pneumoconiosis
• 9% of all lung cancers
• 2% of all leukaemia
• 13% of Chronic
Obstructive Lung Disease
(bronchitis)
• 11% of Asthma
• 100% of pneumoconiosis
• 16% of all hearing loss
• 37% of back pain
NB Each year there are 2 million deaths due to occupational injury and
illness (312,000 due to injuries)
(*data derived from: Fingerhut, M, et al, SJWEH Suppl 2005;no 1:58-61)
Demand for Occupational Hygienists
• Number of hygienists
related to economy and
working population
• Potential demand can be
estimated at ~45,000
certified professionals
across 118 countries
China
With current 1.32 billion pop., if
developed to western levels,
would need 16,000 professionally
qualified hygienists and
association membership of
26,000
(Tresider, 2012)
6-year evolution of a new international
scheme for education, training and
qualifications in occupational hygiene
2009 data
Shared Vision
Aim to reduce the global burden of ill health from
the work environment
• building occupational hygiene
capabilities where there is a need
• promoting consistent quality of training
• encouraging transferability of skills &
qualifications
• fostering a global community of hygiene
practitioners
• creating a sustainable business model
for training
• engaging stakeholder organisations as
partners
Key Partners
Collaboration with
- professional bodies
- employers
- training providers
- other voluntary organisations
Occupational Hygiene
Training Association (OHTA) Ltd
• a not-for-profit organisation of volunteers
• dedicated to improving protection of people worldwide
from the risks of the working environment
• manages the global training and qualifications scheme
in occupational hygiene
• supported by the International Occupational Hygiene
Association and its members
• provides free access to educational materials through
its website (www.OHlearning.com)
Making the Training Accessible
The OHTA website
• has information on careers,
training and qualifications
• allows students to find
training providers, course
dates and locations
• provides free access to the
training materials
• lists the award holders
• links to the global OH
community
• has Community pages for
your own projects
www.OHlearning.com
Sponsors and supporters
All time and effort is provided by volunteers and
supporters. Operating costs are funded through
sponsors and organisations that share our aims
Supporters:
Sponsoring companies:
The Intent
Leadership skills
Senior hygienists
Advanced
qualifications
Hygiene
professionals
Intermediate
modules
Hygiene
technical staff
Principles module
Safety specialists,
engineers etc.
Awareness
Managers and
employees
Available Now
Advanced
modules
Intermediate
modules
Principles
module
• Available through university
postgraduate study leading to
masters degree
• Specialist modules under
development
• Seven 1-week modules based
on practical aspects of
occupational hygiene
• One module for each topic area
• Leads to international certificate
• 1-week module
• Covers the whole breadth of
occupational hygiene at an
introductory level
Training
Professional
4
Intermediate
3
Foundation
2
Qualifications
Achievements so far
•
•
Over 85 courses run in 28
countries (April 2012)
Over 800 International
Occupational Hygiene
Module examinations taken
of which:
– 223 W501 Measurement of
Hazardous Substances
– 164 W201 Basic Principles of
Occupational Hygiene (only
launched in Oct. 2010)
– 130 W505 Control of Hazardous
Substances
•
Nearly 30,000 website
visitors from 170 countries
(April 2012)
Where Next?
Bring hygiene
to a wider
audience
OHTA
Goals
Grow
professional
capabilities
Development
Level
Leadership
Developing
countries
Advanced
Intermediate
International
organisations
Principles
Awareness
Developed
countries
Professional bodies
Q1. How is the scheme going?
• your experience so far
• recommendations for
improvement
Q2. What are the priorities?
• Awareness courses or
advanced and leadership
courses?
• Professional development or
outreach to developing
countries?
• Something else?
Q3. What opportunities do you
see for growing
• funding or sponsorship?
• volunteer support?
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