HAZCOM
Hazardous Communication
29 CFR 1910.1200
“Right To Know”
Purpose
The purpose of the Hazard
Communication Standard (HCS) is to
ensure that the hazards of all chemicals
produced or imported are evaluated and
their hazards communicated to
employees.
Fiscal 2005 Penalties
HAZCOM is OSHA’s second most cited
standard.
7,267 citations written
 $1.4 million in fines

Primary Fines
No MSDS for product
 No written Hazcom program
 Lack of training
 Labeling

2004 Most Cited Violations
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Scaffolding, general requirements, construction (29 CFR 1926.451)
Hazard communication standard, general industry (29 CFR 1910.1200)
Fall protection, construction (29 CFR 1926.501)
Control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout), general industry (29
CFR 1910.147)
Respiratory protection, general industry (29 CFR 1910.134)
Machines, general requirements, general industry (29 CFR 1910.212)
Electrical, wiring methods, components and equipment, general
industry (29 CFR 1910.305)
Powered industrial trucks, general industry (29 CFR 1910.178)
Electrical systems design, general requirements, general industry (29
CFR 1910.303)
Mechanical power-transmission apparatus, general industry (29 CFR
1910.219)
Basics of a HAZCOM Program
Inventory all chemicals in the facility
 Keep a list of all hazardous chemicals
 Have a written HAZCOM program
 Ensure all containers are labeled
 Keep MSDS current
 Train your employees
 Allow access to your HAZCOM
information to your associates

Labels

NFPA – National Fire Protection
Association

HMIS – Hazardous Material
Identification System
NFPA and HMIS Labels
PHYSICAL HAZARD
NFPA labels were designed by the fire
fighters to aid emergency services to
determine the extent of a chemical
hazard.
HMIS labels were designed by the
National Paint & Coatings Association
(NPCA) to help employers comply with
OSHA’s 1910.1200 standard.
OXY = oxidizer ACID = acid
NFPA
Special Symbols: ALK = alkali COR = corrosive
W = keep away from water
PHYSICAL HAZARD
Original HMIS Label
HMIS III Label
HMIS PPE symbols:
A = Safety glasses
B = Safety glasses, gloves
C = Safety glasses, gloves, chemical apron
D = Face shield, gloves, chemical apron
E = Safety glasses, gloves, dust respirator
F = safety glasses, gloves, chemical apron, dust respirator
G = Safety glasses, gloves, vapor respirator
H = Splash goggles, gloves, chemical apron, vapor respirator
I = Safety glasses, gloves, dust and vapor respirator
J = Splash goggles, gloves, chemical apron, dust and vapor respirator
K = Air line hood or mask, gloves, full chemical suit, boots
X = Ask Supervisor
Note: before using any respirator contact EH&S for assistance.
NFPA v’s HMIS Labels
Which labeling system is right for you?
This is up to you. Which system fits your
operation best. Highly recommended that
you pick one and use only one due to the
confusion that may arise in the
differences in wording.
WHMIS
The Workplace Hazardous Materials
Information System (WHMIS) is Canada's
hazard communication standard.
Are there different types of
WHMIS labels?
Yes.
A WHMIS label can be a mark, sign,
stamp, sticker, seal , ticket, tag or
wrapper. It can be attached, imprinted,
stenciled or embossed on the controlled
product or its container.
MSDS
Material Safety Data
Sheets
What Is A Hazardous Chemical?

Hazardous Chemical:
Defined by OSHA as any chemical that
is a health hazard or a physical hazard.
MSDS Structure
In 1984 OSHA established a voluntary
format for MSDS containing 8 sections.
There could be up to 16 sections.
MSDS Structure







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Manufactures Name
Hazardous Ingredients
Physical/Chemical Characteristics
Fire and Explosion Hazard Data
Reactivity Data
Health Hazard Data
Precautions For Safe Handling
Control Measures
MSDS Structure
OSHA specifies the information to be
included on an MSDS, but does not
prescribe the precise format for an
MSDS.
 The MSDS must be in English but you
may have other languages as well.

Training Requirements
Associates must be informed of the
following:

The requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200

Any operations in their work area where
hazardous chemicals are present

The location and availability of the
written hazardous communication
program including the location of MSDS
in your facility.
Associates training shall include at least:
Methods and observations that may be
used to detect the presence or release
of a hazardous chemical in the work
area
 The physical and health hazards of the
chemicals in the work area

The measures associates can take to
protect themselves from hazards
including procedures the employer has
implemented to protect associates from
exposure
 The details of the hazardous
communication program developed by
the employer including an explanation
of the labeling system and MSDS and
how they can obtain and use hazard
information

Off-Site Access

MSDS may be kept at the primary work
place. The MSDS information must be
immediately obtainable for off-site
associates.
MSDS

Some have NFPA hazard info, some
have HMIS info some have both, some
have none.

Important that you understand both.
MSDS Retention
29 CFR 1910.1020 Access to Employee
Exposure and Medical Records, defines
“employee exposure records” to include
MSDS.
The standard requires all employee
exposure records to be maintained for at
least 30 years.
Websites
HMIS

www.ilpi.com/msds/ref/hmis.html

www.paint.org/hmis/hmis_faq3.cfm
NFPA
 www.ilpi.com/msds/ref/nfpa.html

OSHA Website
www.osha.gov/SLTC/hazardcommunica
tions/index.html
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