Department of
Computer Science and Engineering
Undergraduate Academic Guide
• Advising Information
• Core Curriculum
• Course Descriptions
• Degree Plan Information
UNT Research Park (NTRP) F201
(940) 565-2767
www.cse.unt.edu
Valid beginning Fall 2005
Degrees offered
Undergraduate
Bachelor of Science (BS) major in Computer Science
Bachelor of Science (BS) major in Computer Engineering
Bachelor of Arts (BA) major in Computer Science
Undergraduate Minor in Computer Science
Undergraduate Minor: 18 hours, 6 advanced
Graduate
Master of Science (MS) major in Computer Science
Master of Science (MS) major in Computer Engineering
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) major in Computer Science
Graduate Minor in Computer Science
Graduate Minor: 6-12 hours (see advisor)
Faculty
Robert Akl
Assistant Professor, D.Sc., Washington University, 2000.
- Wireless communication, wireless security, multi-cell network optimization, call admission control
Robert Brazile
Associate Professor, Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas, 1985.
- Databases
Ram Dantu
Assistant Professor, Ph.D., Concordia University, Canada, 1990.
- Wireless networks, network security and sensor networks
Ryan Garlick
Visiting Assistant Professor, Ph.D., Southern Methodist University, 2003.
- Meta-heuristics, optical networking, software engineering
Yan Huang
Assistant Professor, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 2003.
- Spatial databases, data mining, geographic information systems
Tom Irby
Assistant Professor, Ph.D., Southern Methodist University, 1976.
- Data structures, software development
Tom Jacob
Associate Professor, Ph.D., Emory, 1974.
- Distributed computing, computational epidemiology
Krishna Kavi
Professor, Ph.D., Southern Methodist University, 1980.
- Computer architecture, multithreading, memory systems, agent-oriented software engineering
David Keathly
Lecturer, M.S. Oklahoma State Univ., 1985
- Computer Vision, Software Engineering, Embedded Architectures and Applications
Hao Li
Assistant Professor, PhD., University of South Florida, 2004
- VLSI Design and CAD, reconfigurable computing, physical design automation, high level and logic synthesis
Rada Mihalcea
Assistant Professor, Ph.D., Southern Methodist University, 2001.
- Natural language processing, machine learning
Armin Mikler
Associate Professor, Ph.D., Iowa State University, 1995.
- Distributed computing, agent-based systems, bio-informatics, computational epidemiology
Saraju Mohanty
Assistant Professor, Ph.D., University of South Florida, 2003.
- VLSI Design
Ian Parberry
Professor, Ph.D., Warwick, 1984.
- Computational complexity, theoretical algorithms, graphics, computer game development
Robert Renka
Professor, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1981.
- Numerical analysis, mathematical software, curve and surface fitting
Don Retzlaff
Lecturer, M.S., University of North Texas, 1979.
- Software engineering
Charles Shields
Lecturer, PhD. University of Texas - Dallas
-Automata
Farhad Shahrokhi
Professor, Ph.D., Western Michigan University, 1987.
- Algorithms, combinatorial optimization, graph theory, geometric computing
Phil Sweany
Associate Professor, Ph.D., Colorado State University, 1992.
- Compilers
Kathleen Swigger
Professor, Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1977.
- Artificial intelligence and human factors
Paul Tarau
Associate Professor, Ph.D., University of Montreal, 1990.
- Intelligent agents, compilers and abstract machines, distributed logic programming and NLP
Steve Tate
Associate Professor, Ph.D., Duke University, 1992.
- Computer security, cryptographic protocols and algorithms
Advising
UNT Research Park (NTRP) Room F201 (940) 565-2767
College of Engineering Advising Office HH 120 (940) 565-4201
Undergraduate
Undergraduate Faculty Advisors: Dr. Ryan Garlick,
David Keathly
Assistant to the Undergraduate Advisor: Ms. Pam Vincent
College Academic Advisors: Nancy Ekiriwang,
Jill Ficialos, Nancy Shaw
College Guidance Counselor: Chris Heiden
Graduate
Graduate Advisor: Dr. Armin Mikler
Assistant to the Graduate Advisor: Ms. Kathy Bomar
Please note that the University of North Texas
Catalog is the final source of degree information.
2
Degree Audit / Graduation Information
Academic Advising
Academic advising is available to assist students in the development and pursuit of meaningful
educational goals. Advisors and counselors are available to assist students with the following:
• Clarification of life and career goals
• Development of suitable educational plans
• Selection of appropriate courses and other educational experiences
• Evaluation of student progress toward established goals
Specially trained advisors in the Dean’s Office for Undergraduates and Student Advising (HH 120) serve
as academic advisors for the College of Engineering majors. Faculty advisors assist students in clarifying
their academic interests and career goals and are available in the academic department. All students
are encouraged to meet with their advisor every semester.
Degree Requirements
The basic structure of all bachelor’s degrees consists of a large set of general education requirements
common to all degrees (University Core Curriculum – 47 hours at UNT), a small set of requirements unique
to the school or college offering the degree (College Requirements), a set of requirements defining a
major field of study as determined by a department (Major/Professional Field/Concentration – a
minimum of 24 hours), a smaller set (minimum of 18 hours) for a lesser field of study (Minor) and electives
chosen freely or in consultation with an advisor to reach the minimum number of hours required for the
degree. All degrees require that 24 of the last 30 hours be earned at UNT and that at least 42 hours are
at the advanced level (3XXX and 4XXX courses).
Degree Audit Preparation
What is a Degree Audit?
A degree audit is an official document of the University. It lists all the courses needed to complete your
chosen degree and shows how all the courses you have completed are being applied toward your
degree.
When should I get a Degree Audit?
You should request a degree audit after you have chosen a major.
You must have a degree audit on file in order to graduate!
How do I get a Degree Audit?
1. Contact the departmental advisor of your major for an appointment to initiate a degree audit. If you
have transfer work you will need an evaluated copy of all transcripts and a catalog description of all
courses completed. (Transcripts may be ordered at the Office of the Registrar. You may pick them up
or have them sent to your major department.)
2. The faculty advisor for your major will complete the departmental advising sheet. If you are declaring a
minor, you must do so at the time your advising sheet is prepared.
3. A copy of the degree audit will be mailed to your permanent address (unless otherwise advised), and a
copy will be sent to the department of your major.
4. It is your responsibility to update each semester’s progress on your copy of the degree audit. If you feel
you need assistance, you should schedule an appointment with your advisor.
Graduation Application
You must apply for graduation at the beginning of the semester in which you intend to graduate. The
application may be obtained at either the Registrar’s Office or the Office of Student Advising (HH 120)
but must be submitted to the Office of Student Advising in HH 120. In order to apply for graduation the
following requirements must be met:
1. Submit a graduation application by the deadline stated in the Schedule of Classes.
2. Register for all the requirements stated on the degree audit for graduation within student load limits.
3. Have a minimum overall grade point average of 2.0 on all college work attempted and a 2.0 on all UNT
course work.
Graduation with Honors
Candidates for graduation whose overall grade point average is at least 3.500 but less than 3.800 are
eligible to graduate cum laude; those whose GPA is at least 3.800 but less than 4.000 are eligible to
graduate magna cum laude; and those whose GPA is 4.000 (all A's) are eligible to graduate summa
cum laude. The grade point average is based on grades earned in University of North Texas resident
credit courses and transferred credit courses.
Hours earned from pass/no pass courses and through correspondence and extension courses may not
be counted in calculating the GPA for determination of eligibility for graduation with honors. Candidates
for a second bachelor's degree are not eligible for graduation with honors.
3
Academic Standards
Semester Honors
President’s List
Students completing at least 12 hours of credit in regularly graded courses taken in residence during the
Fall or Spring semester with a grade point average of 4.0 are eligible for recognition on the President's
List. Students are notified of this recognition by the President’s Office.
Dean’s List
Students with a grade point average of 3.50 to 3.99 are eligible for recognition on the Dean's List if they
have completed at least 12 hours of credit in regularly graded courses taken in residence during the Fall
or Spring semester. Students are notified of this recognition by the Dean’s Office for Undergraduates
and Student Advising.
Academic Status
Good Standing
Students with at least a cumulative 2.00 UNT GPA are considered in Good Standing.
Academic Alert
Freshmen (students with less than 30 attempted hours) whose cumulative UNT GPA falls below 2.00 for
the first time are placed on Academic Alert. Students can only be placed on Academic Alert once;
they must raise their cumulative UNT GPA to 2.00 or higher during their Academic Alert semester or they
will be placed on Probation.
Probation
Students not eligible for Academic Alert whose cumulative UNT GPA falls below 2.00 will be placed on
Probation. Students on Probation during a Fall or Spring semester must raise their cumulative UNT GPA to
2.00 to return to Good Standing or earn a semester GPA of at least 2.25 to remain on Probation and
avoid Suspension.
Suspension
During a Fall or Spring semester, Probation students who fail to raise their cumulative UNT GPA to a 2.00 or
earn a 2.25 semester GPA are placed on Suspension for one or more semesters. A first Suspension is for
one long semester, a second Suspension is for two long semesters and a third Suspension is for a
minimum of four long semesters. After students complete their Suspension period, they may return to UNT
on Probation.
Summer Sessions and Academic Status
Students who are on Probation cannot be placed on Suspension as a result of summer grades at UNT;
however, students in Good Standing may be placed on Probation as a result of summer grades at UNT.
Suspension students are eligible and are strongly encouraged to take summer courses at UNT. Students
on Suspension who attend UNT during the summer and raise their cumulative UNT GPA to 2.00 are eligible
to attend UNT during the Fall semester.
Enrollment at UNT & Another Institution (Concurrent Enrollment)
Approval for concurrent enrollment at another university/college must be obtained in advance from the
Dean’s Office for Undergraduates and Student Advising (HH 120).
•
•
•
•
The following guidelines apply for approval of Concurrent Enrollment:
The student’s combined course load at both institutions cannot exceed the course load allowed at UNT
for that term.
Students must meet residency requirements for concurrent enrollment to be granted, including 24 of
their last 30 hours in residence at UNT.
Students who are concurrently enrolled during the semester they plan to complete all degree
requirements must wait until the following semester to file for graduation.
Course work taken concurrently at another university/college may not be accepted by UNT without prior
written approval.
Course Load
•
•
•
The normal course load for a full-time student is 15 hours for a Fall or Spring semester, 6 hours for each
Summer term and 3 hours for Mini-Mester.
A student may schedule up to a maximum of 19 hours per Fall or Spring semester, 7 hours for each
Summer term and 4 hours for Mini-Mester.
A student must be registered for a minimum of 12 hours to qualify as a full-time student. Students
receiving financial aid must consult the Financial Aid and Scholarships Office for course load
requirements.
4
Overload Approval
Fall or Spring Semesters
A student with a GPA of less than 3.0 may register for a maximum of 19 hours. Students who wish to register for more
than 19 hours (maximum 21 hours) in a Fall or Spring semester must meet one of the following conditions and obtain
approval in advance from the Dean’s Office for Undergraduates and Student Advising (HH 120):
• At least a 3.0 GPA on a minimum 15-hour UNT residence load for the semester just completed.
• At least a 3.0 GPA on a minimum 12-hour UNT residence load for the summer terms just completed.
• At least a 3.0 GPA on all work completed at UNT and a minimum 24 hours of credit in residence.
Summer I or Summer II Terms
A student with a GPA of less than 3.0 may register for a maximum of 7 hours for each term or 14 hours for both summer
terms. Students who wish to register for more than 7 hours, maximum of 9 in a summer session or 15 hours for both
summer terms (Summer I/Summer II), must meet one of the following conditions and obtain written approval in
advance from the Dean’s Office for Undergraduates and Student Advising (HH 120):
• At least a 3.0 GPA on a minimum 15-hour residence load for the semester just completed.
• At least a 3.0 GPA on all work completed at UNT and a minimum 24 hours of credit in residence.
Mini-Mester
No overloads will be granted for the Mini-mester. A student may take a maximum of 4 hours during the Mini-mester.
COURSE DUPLICATIONS
If a student’s transcripts contain the same course number more than twice, only the second course will be treated as a
duplication. The Registrar’s Office will include, without exception, any course repeated more than once in the
student’s cumulative GPA. However, only the last grade will be used in certifying the student’s eligibility for
graduation.
Dropping Courses or Withdrawal from UNT
It is the student’s responsibility to consult the Academic Calendar in the Schedule of Classes or at
www.unt.edu/catsched for the procedures and deadlines for dropping a course or withdrawing from UNT.
Pass/No Pass Grading Option
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Students who select the Pass/No Pass Grading Option must obtain approval from the Dean’s Office for
Undergraduates and Student Advising (HH 120). The following guidelines apply for students requesting the Pass/No
Pass Grading Option:
A maximum of 18 semester hours of credit under the pass/no pass option may be applied toward the bachelor's
degree. Only courses to be counted as freely chosen electives on the student's degree audit may be scheduled
under the Pass/No Pass option.
Any undergraduate student in good standing with a C average (2.0) or better on all work attempted in residence at
UNT may schedule one course a semester on the pass/no pass option. Incoming freshmen also may elect this option.
Graduating seniors may elect more than one pass/no pass course during their final semester.
Students receive credit for courses successfully completed under the pass/no pass option, but these hours are not
used in calculating the grade point average.
Instructors are not told which students are enrolled under the pass/no pass option, and all students are graded alike.
If a student receives a grade of D or better from the instructor, the student's transcript shows the course has been
passed (P). If the course is not passed, the record shows NP and the hours attempted are not used in calculating
the grade point average.
The pass/no pass option for a particular course is elected at the time of registration. A student may request to
change to the regular grading system anytime before the end of the sixth week of classes or the corresponding
point of a summer term. If a student is registered in a course under the regular grading system, a change to the
pass/no pass option may be requested anytime before the end of the sixth week of classes or the corresponding
point of a summer term, provided eligibility requirements 1 and 2 above are met. (See dates in the Academic
Calendar section of the current undergraduate catalog.)
A student may not repeat under the pass/no pass option any course taken previously under the regular grading
system unless a grade of W was received in that course.
A student who changes majors is not automatically denied credit for a pass/no pass course that becomes a degree
plan requirement for the new major. The decision about a course meeting a requirement for the student's new
major is made by the Academic Dean. However, under no circumstances is a grade of P changed to a letter
grade.
Transfer students have the same pass/no pass privileges and restrictions, but they must successfully complete 31
semester hours of regular graded courses at UNT to be eligible for graduation.
5
CORE CURRICULUM FOR BA IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Bachelor of Arts
Effective Fall 2005
Bachelor of Arts
•A Minimum of 128 semester hours required for graduation.
•42 advanced (3000-4000 level) hours required for degree (minimum of 24 must be taken at UNT).
•A minimum of 31 semester hours must be completed at UNT.
•24 of your last 30 hours must be taken at UNT.
THIS IS A SIMPLIFIED GUIDE TO SELECTING COURSES – PLEASE MEET WITH YOUR ADVISOR AND
CHECK THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG FOR ALL COURSE OPTIONS IN EACH CATEGORY
Must earn at least a grade of “C” in each course and a
2.5 GPA for each category
LABORATORY SCIENCES (12 Hours; 3 courses with labs)
_____________ _______________ ______________
_____________ _______________ ______________
MATHEMATICS (6 Hours)
CSCE 3110 has a prerequisite of MATH 2770; MATH 2770
has a prerequisite of MATH 1710; MATH 1710 has a
prerequisite of MATH 1650; and MATH 1650 has a
prerequisite of MATH 1100. CSCE 3110 is a required
course for the major.
________________________ _____________________
ENGLISH (6 Hours)
ENGL 1310,1311,1312, or 1313
__________________
Second English fulfilled by ENGL 2700
UNITED STATES HISTORY (6 Hours)
HIST 2610-2620 or Honors equivalents. History 4700 (Texas History)
or any advanced US-Topic History course(s) may substitute for
either of the US History survey courses.
POLITICAL SCIENCE (6 Hours)
PSCI 1040_____ PSCI 1050______
NOTE: If you are transferring credit for either PSCI course, please
check with your advisor. Do not assume that your “first“ course
ORAL / ADVANCED WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS (6 Hours)
elsewhere is the same as PSCI 1040. An out-of-state American
(Satisfies the University English II & Communications Requirement) Government course cannot be equivalent to PSCI 1040 but may
ENGL 2700 ______________(satisfies second English requirement)
be equivalent to PSCI 1050. Any advanced US- Topic Political
GNET 2060 ______________(satisfies University requirement)
Science course may substitute for PSCI 1050 only.
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (3 Hours)
__________________
NOTE: The student is required to maintain a 2.75 GPA in all
advanced CSCE courses.
VISUAL / PERFORMING ARTS (3 Hours) __________________
COMPUTER SCIENCE (30 Hours, 18 advanced hours, 12 of
which must be at UNT)
HUMANITIES (3 Hours)
__________________
Group I. CSCE Required Courses
WELLNESS (3 Hours)
__________________
1030 (4 Hrs.)
1040 (3 Hrs.)
2050 (3 Hrs.)
2610 (3 Hrs.)
3110 (3 Hrs.)
3600 (3 Hrs.)
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
Group II. CSCE Optional Courses
(3 Hrs.)
(3 Hrs.)
(3 Hrs.)
(3 Hrs.)
__________________
__________________
__________________
__________________
(free option)
(advanced)
(advanced)
(advanced)
A maximum of 6 hours of credit can be received in CSCE 4910,
4915, 4930 or 4940, 4950 and 4890.
CROSS CULTURAL, DIVERSITY, & GLOBAL STUDIES (3 Hours)
_____________________
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (4 Hours)
CSCE 2610 requires ELET 2720.
ELET 2720
_______________
FOREIGN LANGUAGE (3-14 Hours or Proficiency)
Must attain Intermediate II (2050) level or greater.
1010 _______________
1020 _______________
2040 _______________
2050 _______________
ELECTIVE COURSES (To reach 128 Hrs, 42 Advanced Hrs.)
Check with your advisor concerning elective courses
6
Course Offerings Related to the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Computer Science
A. ENGLISH ( 6 Hrs. U)
Composition I
ENGL 1310 College Writing I
1313 Computer Assisted College Writing I
1311 Honors Composition I
1312 Gram. & Comp. For International Students
Composition II
ENGL 1320 College Writing II
1323 Computer Assisted College Writing II
1321 Honors Composition II
1322 Composition and Rhetoric for
International Students
2700 Technical Writing
2702 Technical Writing for International Students
B. MATHEMATICS ( 3 Hrs. U)
MATH 1100 College Algebra or higher
NOTE: MATH 2090 is restricted to
Elementary Education majors
D. VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS (3 Hrs. U)
ART 1300 Art Appreciation
2360 Art History Survey II
DANC 1200 Appreciation of Dance
2800 Survey of Dance
MUMH 1600 Music in Human Imagination
2040 Music Appreciation
3000 Nineteenth-Century Music
3010 Twentieth-Century Music
THEA 1340 Aesthetics of the Theatre
1375 The Actor and the Text
2340 Theater Appreciation
E. HUMANITIES (3 Hrs. U)
ENGL 2210 World Literature I
2211 Honors World Literature I
2220 World Literature II
2221 Honors World Literature II
2352 Lit. for International Students I
2362 Lit. for International Students II
PHIL 1050 Introduction to Philosophy
1400 Intro. To Contemp. Moral Issues
2050 Introduction to Logic
2310 Intro. To Ancient Philosophy
2330 Intro. To Modern Philosophy
2500 Intro. To Contemp. Environ. Issues
F. UNITED STATES HISTORY ( 6 Hrs. U)
HIST 2610 US to 1865
2675 Honors US History to 1865
2620 US from 1865 or Advanced US History
2685 Honors US History from 1865
G. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT ( 6 Hrs. U)
PSCI 1040 American Government
1041 Honors American Government
1050 American Government
1051 Honors American Government
H. SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (3 Hrs. U)
ANTH 1010 General Anthropology
2250 Intro. To Sociocultural Anthropology
ECON 1110 Macro-economics
EBCD 1220 Human Development
GEOG 1170 Intro. To Human Geography
H. SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE ( 3 Hrs., U)
PSCI 2310 Democracies and its Critics
3310 Political Theory: Socrates to the 18th Cent.
3320 Political Theory: 18th Cent. To the Present
PSYC 1630 General Psychology I
1650 General Psychology II
SOCI 1510 Individuals in Society
1520 Contemporary Social Problems
I. WELLNESS (3 Hrs.)
DANC 1100 Stress Reduction through Movement
PHED 1000 Principles and Practices of
Health Related Fitness
PSYC 2580 Health Psychology
SMHM 1450 Principles of Nutrition
J. CROSSCULTURAL, DIVERSITY, & GLOBAL STUDIES
AGER 4560 Minority Aging
4800 The Social Context of Aging
ANTH 2045 Gender Across Cultures
2100 World Cultures Through Film
2150 World Cultures
2350 Cultural Diversity in the U. S.
4050 Contemporary Ethnic Groups
ART 2350 Art History Surbey I
ATTD 4490 Serving Learners from Special Pop
In Applied Technology Programs
BUSI 1340 Freelance Enterprise System in a
Global Environment
CJUS 2600 Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice
COMM 4260 Performance and Culture
EDCD 2010 Parenting in Diverse Families
ENGL 3450 Short Story
4300 Modern Drama
GEOG 1200 World Regional Geography
3100 Geography in the U.S. and Canada
3750 Geography of Contemp. Sub Saharan Africa
HIST 1050 World Civilization to the 16th Century
1075 Honors World Civ. To the 16th Century
1060 World Civilization from the 16th Century
1085 Honors World Civ. From the 16th Century
HLTH 1100 School & Community Health Services
2200 Family Life and Human Sexuality
JOUR 1210 Mass Communications and Society
4250 Race, Gender, and the Media
KINE 2000 History and Philosophy of Sport
2050 Sociology of Sport (SOCI 2050)
MKTG 2650 Principles of Global Marketing
MUET 3020 Popular Music in American Culture
PADM 2100 Diversity in Urban Governance
PHIL 2070 Introductions to Great Religions
2400 Religions & American Society
PSCI 3500 Introduction to Peace Studies
3810 International Relations
4520 International Human Rights
4620 Political Change
4660 Democracy and Democratization
4710 Middle East Politics
4720 Ehtnicity in World Politics
4850 Critical Issues in World Politics
RECR 2550 Leisure and Society
RTVF 2700 World Cinema Survey
SMHM 2750 Consumers in a Global Market
4750 Managing a Diverse Workforce
SOCI 2010 Race, Class, Gender, Ethnicity
4160 Developing Societies
SOWK 4540 Race and Ethnic Minorities
THEA 2260 Non-Western Theatre and Drama
4250 World Theatre to 1700
4300 World Theatre after 1700
WMST 2100 Woman and Society: Introduction
To Women's Studies
K. COMMUNICATIONS ( 3 Hrs. U)
COMM 1010 Introduction to Communications
1440 Honors Classical Argument
2020 Interpersonal Communications
2040 Public Speaking
2060 Performance of Literature
GNET 2060 Professional Presentations
LANG 1010 Elementary Language I
1020 Elementary Language II
2040 Intermediate Language I
2050 Intermediate Language II
JOUR 2310 News reporting and Writing I
MKTG Professional Selling
SMHM Presentation Techniques
SPHS 1020 Speech for International Students
J. MATHEMATICS (3 Hrs. C)
MATH 1710 Calculus I
1720 Calculus II
1780 Probability Models
2700 Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry
2770 Discrete Mathematics
3310 Differential Equations with Applications
Prerequisite MATH for CSCI (D)
CSCI 3400 is a required course. Math 2770 is a prerequisite
for CSCI 3400. Math 1710 is a prerequisite for Math 2770.
Math 1650 is a prerequisite for Math 1710. Math 1100 is a
prerequisite for Math 1650.
2. LABORATORY Sciences (U + 4 Hrs.).
BIOL 1710 / 1730 Principles of Biology I
171181730 Honors Principles of Biology I
1720 / 1740 Principles of Biology II
1722/1740 Honors o Principles of Biology II
CHEM 1410 / 1430 General Chemistry
1412/1413 Honors General Chemistry
PHYS 1710 / 1730 Mechanics
2220 / 2240 Electricity and Magnetism
3. ORAL / ADVANCED WRITTEN COMM (3 Hrs.)
ENGL 2700 Technical Writing
GNET 2060 Professional Presentations.
4. FOREIGN LANGUAGE ( 3 - 14 Hrs. or Proficiency)
LANG 2040 Intermediate I
2050 Intermediate II
a. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
ELET 2720 Digital Logic
7
Bachelor of Arts Major in Computer Science
suggested four-year degree plan
Students are encouraged to see their advisor each semester for program decisions and enrollment.
FRESHMAN YEAR
FALL
CSCE 1030, Computer Science I
ENGL 1310 or 1313, Composition I
LANG 2040, Foreign Language, Intermediate
MATH 1650, Pre-calculus
4
3
3
5
Total Hours
15
SPRING
CSCE 1040, Computer Science II
ENGL 2700, Technical Writing
LANG 2050, Foreign Language , Intermediate
PSCI 1040, American Government
Social & Behavioral Science
Total Hours
3
3
3
3
3
15
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FALL
ELET 2720, Digital Logic
Humanities
MATH 1710, Calculus I
CSCE 2050, Computer Science III
GNET 2060
Total Hours
SPRING
4
3
4
3
3
17
Literature
MATH 2770, Discrete Mathematical Structures
PSCI 1050, American Government
CSCE Option
Elective (advanced)
Elective
Total Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
JUNIOR YEAR
FALL
CSCE 2610, Computer Organization
CSCE 3110, Data Structures
HIST 2610,United States History to 1865
Natural Sciences
Wellness
Total Hours
3
3
3
4
3
16
SPRING
CSCE 3600, Principles of Systems Programming
HIST 2620, United States History Since 1865
Elective (Advanced)
Laboratory Science
Cross Cultural, Diversity, & Global Studies
Total Hours
3
3
3
4
3
16
SENIOR YEAR
FALL
CSCE Option (advanced)
Elective (advanced)
Elective (advanced)
Laboratory Science
Visual and Performing Arts
Total Hours
3
3
3
4
3
16
SPRING
CSCE Option (advanced )
CSCE Option (advanced)
Elective (advanced)
Elective (advanced)
Elective (advanced)
Total Hours
3
3
3
3
3
15
8
CORE CURRICULUM FOR BS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Bachelor of Science
Effective Fall 2005
Bachelor of Science
•A Minimum of 131 semester hours required for graduation.
•45 advanced (3000-4000 level) hours required for degree (minimum of 24 must be taken at UNT).
•A minimum of 31 semester hours must be completed at UNT.
•24 of your last 30 hours must be taken at UNT.
THIS IS A SIMPLIFIED GUIDE TO SELECTING COURSES – PLEASE MEET WITH YOUR ADVISOR AND
CHECK THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG FOR ALL COURSE OPTIONS IN EACH CATEGORY
LABORATORY SCIENCES (16 Hours; 4 courses with labs)
PHYS 1710-1730 (4 hours)
__________________
PHYS 2220-2240 (4 hours)
__________________
Natural Life Science (4 hours)
__________________
Must earn at least a “C” in 3 courses and a 2.5 GPA
Plus one course from approved list – see catalog.
MATHEMATICS (16 Hours)
MATH 1710 (4 hours)
__________________
MATH 1720 (3 hours)
__________________
MATH 1780 (3 hours)
__________________
MATH 2770 (3 hours)
__________________
And MATH 2700, 3350, or 3410
Must earn at least a “C” in 2 courses and a 2.5 GPA
ENGLISH (3 Hours)
ENGL 1310,1311,1312, or 1313
__________________
Second English fulfilled by ENGL 2700
UNITED STATES HISTORY (6 Hours)
HIST 2610-2620 or Honors equivalents. History 4700 (Texas History)
or any advanced US-Topic History course(s) may substitute for
either of the US History survey courses.
POLITICAL SCIENCE (6 Hours)
PSCI 1040_____ PSCI 1050_____
NOTE: If you are transferring credit for either PSCI course, please
check with your advisor. Do not assume that your “first“ course
elsewhere is the same as PSCI 1040. An out-of-state American
ORAL / ADVANCED WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS (6 Hours)
(Satisfies the University English II & Communications Requirement) Government course cannot be equivalent to PSCI 1040 but may
be equivalent to PSCI 1050. Any advanced US- Topic Political
ENGL 2700 ______________(satisfies second English requirement)
Science course may substitute for PSCI 1050 only.
GNET 2060 ______________(satisfies University requirement)
Must earn at least a “C” in both courses and a 2.5 GPA
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (3 Hours)
__________________
NOTE: The student is required to maintain a 2.75 GPA in all
advanced CSCE courses.
COMPUTER SCIENCE (45 Hours, 28-34 advanced hours, 12 of
which must be at UNT)
VISUAL / PERFORMING ARTS (3 Hours) __________________
HUMANITIES (3 Hours)
__________________
WELLNESS (3 Hours)
__________________
Group I. CSCE Required Courses (27 hours)
1030 (4 Hours)
1040 (3 Hours)
2050 (3 Hours)
2610 (3 Hours)
3110 (3 Hours)
3600 (3 Hours)
4010 (2 Hours)
4110 (3 Hours)
4410 (3 Hours)
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
Group II. CSCE Optional Courses (18 hours)
(3 Hours)
(3 Hours)
(3 Hours)
(3 Hours)
(3 Hours)
(3 Hours)
__________________
__________________
__________________
__________________
__________________
__________________
(free option)
(advanced)
(advanced)
(advanced)
(advanced)
(advanced)
CROSS CULTURAL, DIVERSITY, & GLOBAL STUDIES (3 Hours)
_____________________
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (4 Hours)
CSCE 2610 requires ELET 2720. ELET 2720 _______________
ADVANCED TECHNICAL WRITING (3 Hours)
1 of ENGL 4180, ENGL 4190, or ENGL 4250.
A 2nd and 3rd advanced Tech Writing course will earn the
Student a certificate in Tech Writing. _____________
A maximum of 6 hours of credit can be received in CSCE 4910,
4915, 4930, 4940, 4950 or 4980.
ELECTIVE COURSES (To reach 131 Hrs, 45 Advanced Hrs.)
Check with your advisor concerning elective courses
9
Bachelor of Science Major in Computer Science
suggested four-year degree plan.
Students are encouraged to see their advisor each semester for program decisions and enrollment.
FRESHMAN YEAR
FALL
CSCE 1030, Computer Science I
ENGL 1310 College Writing I
PSCI 1040, American Government
MATH 1710, Calculus I
GNET 2060 Professional Presnetations
Total Hours
4
3
3
4
3
17
SPRING
CSCE 1040, Computer Science II
ENGL 2700, Technical Writing
MATH 2770, Discrete Mathematical Structures
PSCI 1050, American Government
Visual and Performing Arts
Total Hours
3
3
3
3
3
15
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FALL
CSCE 2050, Computer Science III
ELET 2720, Digital Logic
Humanities (World Lit. I Recommended)
MATH 1720, Calculus II
HIST 2610, United States History to 1865
Total Hours
3
4
3
3
3
16
SPRING
CSCE 2610, Computer Organization
CSCE 3110, Data Structures
Wellness
MATH 1780, Introduction to Statistical Analysis
HIST 2620, United States History Since 1865
Social and behavioral Sciences
Total Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
SPRING
CSCE Option (advanced)
CSCE Option (advanced)
ENGL 4180 or 4190 or 4250
PHYS 2220 / 2240 Electricity and Magnetism
Cross Cultural, Diversity, & Global Studies
Total Hours
3
3
3
4
3
16
SPRING
CSCE 4010
CSCE Option (advanced)
CSCE Option (advanced)
Laboratory Science
Elective (advanced)
Elective (advanced)
Total Hours
2
3
3
4
3
3
18
JUNIOR YEAR
FALL
CSCE 3600, Principles of Systems
MATH 2700 or 3350 or 3410
PHYS 1710 / 1730 Mechanics
CSCE Option (advanced)
Elective
Total Hours
3
3
4
3
3
16
SENIOR YEAR
FALL
CSCE 4110, Analysis of Algorithms
CSCE 4410 Software Development I
CSCE Option (advanced)
Elective (advanced)
Laboratory Science
Total Hours
3
3
3
3
4
16
10
Course Offerings Related to the Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science
(NOTE: Course offerings listed here meet the proposed requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in Computer
Science and Engineering Department, and, where possible, the University Core and the College of Engineering Core.)
ENGLISH ( 6 Hrs.)
Composition I (3 Hrs. U, C, D)
ENGL 1310 College Writing I
1313 Computer Assisted College Writing I
1311 Honors Composition I
1312 Gram. & Comp. For International Students
Composition II (3 Hrs. U, C, D)
ENGL 2700 Technical Writing
2702 Technical Writing for International Students
MATHEMATICS (16 Hrs.)
(The following are departmental& college requirements for
a BS in CSCI. University requirements are
satisfied. (MATH 1650 is a prerequisite for MATH 1710.
MATH 1100 is a prerequisite for MATH 1650.)
MATH 1710 Calculus I
2770 Discrete Mathematical Structures
1720 Calculus II
1780 Introduction to Statistical Analysis
Plus one of the following:
2700 Linear Algebra & Vector Geometry
3350 Introduction to Numerical Analysis
3410 Differential Equations I
U N IT E D ST A T E S H IST O R Y cont . . .
2620 U S from 1865 or A dvanced U S H istory
2685 H onors U S H istory from 1865
A M E R IC A N G O V E R N M E N T ( 6 H rs. U )
PSC I 1040 A m erican G overnm ent
1041 H onors A m erican G overnm ent
1050 A m erican G overnm ent
1051 H onors A m erican G overnm ent
SO C IA L & B E H A V IO R A L SC IE N C E S (3 H rs. U )
A N T H 1010 G eneral A nthropology
2250 Intro. To Sociocultural A nthropology
E C O N 1110 M acro-econom ics
E B C D 1220 H um an D evelopm ent
G E O G 1170 Intro. To H um an G eography
G N E T 1030 Technological System s
PSC I 2310 D em ocracies and its C ritics
3310 Political Theory : Socrates to the 18th C ent.
3320 Political Theory : 18th C ent. To the Present
PSY C 1630 G eneral Psychology I
1650 G eneral Psychology II
SO C I 1510 Individuals in Society
1520 C ontem porary Social Problem s
CROSSCULTURAL, DIVERSITY, & GLOBAL
STUDIES cont…
4720 Ehtnicity in World Politics
4850 Critical Issues in World Politics
RECR 2550 Leisure and Society
RTVF 2700 World Cinema Survey
SMHM2750 Consumers in a Global Market
4750 Managing a Diverse Workforce
SOCI 2010 Race, Class, Gender, Ethnicity
4160 Developing Societies
SOWK4540 Race and Ethnic Minorities
THEA 2260 Non-Western Theatre and Drama
4250 World Theatre to 1700
4300 World Theatre after 1700
WMST2100 Woman and Society: Introduction
To Women's Studies
ORAL/ADV WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS
(6 Hrs.)
ENGL 2700 Technical Writing
GNET 2060 Professional Presentations
3 hours Advanced Tech Writing,
ENGL (Any 1 out of the following three
4180 Advanced Technical Writing
4190 Technical Editing
4250 Writing Technical Procedures
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (4 Hrs)
ELET 2720 Digital Logic
LAB SCIENCES (16 Hrs.) (Only these courses listed are
W E L L N E SS (3 H rs.)
valid for the BS in CSCI student. PHYS 1710 / 1730 & 2220
D A N C 1100 Stress R eduction through M ovem ent
/ 2240 must be taken. At least 4 hr. of Natural & Life
COMPUTER SCIENCE (45 Hrs.)
PH E D 1000 Principles and Practices of
Sciences must be taken. The remaining may come out of
CSCE 1030. Computer Science I
H ealth R elated Fitness
either group below. Fulfills the University and College Core.)
1040. Computer Science II
PSY C 2580 H ealth Psychology
PHYS 1710/1730 Mechanics
2050. Computer Science III
SM H M 1450 Principles of N utrition
2220/2240 Electricity & Magnetism
2900. Special Problems in Computer Science.
BIOL 1710 / 1730 Principles of Biology I
2610. Computer Organization.
1720 / 1740 Principles of Biology II
C R O SSC U L T U R A L , D IV E R SIT Y , & G L O B A L ST U D IE S
3210. Symbolic Processing.
CHEM 1410/1430 General Chemistry
A G E R 4560 M inority A ging
3110. Data Structures.
1420/1440 General Chemistry II
4800 The Social C ontext of A ging
3600. Principles of Systems Programming.
GEOL 1610 Physical Geology
A N T H 2045 G ender A cross C ultures
3530. Introduction to Computer Networks.
GEOG 1710 Earth Sciences
4410-4420. Software Development
2100 W orld C ultures Through Film
ARCH 2800 Archaeological Science
4210. Computer Game Programming
2150 W orld C ultures
4430. Survey of Computer Languages.
2350 C ultural D iversity in the U . S.
3300. File Organization and Processing.
4050 C ontem porary E thnic G roups
4930. Topics in Computer Sciences.
ART
2350 A rt H istory Surbey I
VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS (3 Hrs..
4350. Introduction to Database Systems
ART 1300 Art Appreciation
A T TD 4490 Serving Learners from Special Pop
4310. Introduction to Artificial Intelligence.
2360 Art History Survey II
In A pplied Technology Program s
4230. Introduction to Computer Graphics.
DANC 1200 Appreciation of Dance
B U S I 1340 Freelance E nterprise System in a
4110. Algorithm Analysis and Complexity
2800 Survey of Dance
G lobal E nvironm ent
3610. Machine Structures.
MUMH 1600 Music in Human Imagination
C JU S 2600 D iversity Issues in C rim inal Justice
4600. Introduction to Operating Systems
2040 Music Appreciation
C O M M 4260 Perform ance and C ulture
4010. Social Implications of Computer
3000 Nineteenth-Century Music
E D C D 2010 Parenting in D iverse Fam ilies
4940. Special Computer Application Problem.
3010 Twentieth-Century Music
E N G L 3450 Short Story
4890. Directed Study.
THEA 1340 Aesthetics of the Theatre
4300 M odern D ram a
1375 The Actor and the Text
NOTE: See page 7 for a complete listing and
2340 Theater Appreciation
G E O G 1200 W orld R egional G eography
HUMANITIES (3 Hrs.)
ENGL 2210 World Literature I
2211 Honors World Literature I
2220 World Literature II
2221 Honors World Literature II
2352 Lit. for International Students I
2362 Lit. for International Students II
PHIL 1050 Introduction to Philosophy
1400 Intro. To Contemp. Moral Issues
2050 Introduction to Logic
2310 Intro. To Ancient Philosophy
3100 G eography in the U .S. and C anada
3750 G eography of C ontem p. Sub Saharan A frica
H IS T 1050 W orld C ivilization to the 16th C entury
1075 H onors W orld C iv. To the 16th C entury
1060 W orld C ivilization from the 16th C entury
1085 H onors W orld C iv. From the 16th C entury
H LTH 1100 School & C om m unity H ealth Services
2200 Fam ily Life and H um an Sexuality
JO U R 1210 M ass C om m unications and Society
4250 R ace, G ender, and the M edia
K IN E 2000 H istory and Philosophy of Sport
2050 Sociology of Sport (SO C I 2050)
M K T G 2650 Principles of G lobal M arketing
M U E T3020 Popular M usic in A m erican C ulture
PA D M 2100 D iversity in U rban G overnance
PH IL 2070 Introductions to G reat R eligions
2400 R eligions & A m erican Society
PSC I 3500 Introduction to Peace Studies
3810 International R elations
4520 International H um an R ights
4620 Political C hange
4660 D em ocracy and D em ocratization
4710 M iddle E ast Politics
descriptions of undergraduate Computer Sciences
courses.
11
Prerequisite Structure
CSCE 4110
Algorithm
Analysis
BA / BS in Computer Science
CSCE 4920
Co-op
See Undergraduate
catalog for requirements
CSCE 2900
Special
Problems
Elective credit only
CSCE 1010
Intro to CS
CSCE 4310
Intro to AI
CSCE 3210 or
knowledge of LISP
or PROLOG
Math 2700,
3350, or
3410
CSCE 4410
Software
Develop. I
CSCE 4950
CSCE 4350
Database
Systems
CSCE 4940
CSCE 4890
Maximum 6 hours credit in
these courses
CSCE 4430
Survey of
Languages
MATH 1650
Pre-Calculus
MATH 1100
College
Algebra
CSCE 4600
Intro. to OS
CSCE 4210
Game
Programming
requires
Junior level
standing
CSCE 2410
Programming
Lab
can be
concurrent
CSCE 3610
Machine
Structures
CSCE 4010
Social
Implications
CSCE 3110
Data
Structures
MATH 2770
Discrete
Math
MATH 1710
Calculus I
See math
department for
placement
before
registering for
your first math
course
CSCE 4950
CSCE 3210
Symbolic
Processing
Math 1720
Calculus II
Math 1780
Probability
Models
CSCE 4230
Computer
Graphics
CSCE 3300
File Org and
Processing
Not for CSCE major credit
CSCE 4420
Software
Develop. II
Special Problems / Directed Study
See Undergraduate catalog for
requirements
CSCE 1040
CS II
CSCE 3600
Systems
Program.
CSCE 3530
Into to
Networks
CSCE 2610
Computer
Organization
CSCE 2050
CS III
Can be taken
concurrently
ELET 2720
Digital Logic
CSCE 1030
CS I
Optional
MATH 1010
Fund. of
Algebra
HIGH SCHOOL
ALGEBRA
Required for
BA & BS
Required for
BS only
12
CORE CURRICULUM FOR BS IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING
Bachelor of Science
Effective Fall 2005
Bachelor of Science
•A Minimum of 131 semester hours required for graduation.
•45 advanced (3000-4000 level) hours required for degree (minimum of 24 must be taken at UNT).
•A minimum of 31 semester hours must be completed at UNT.
•24 of your last 30 hours must be taken at UNT.
THIS IS A SIMPLIFIED GUIDE TO SELECTING COURSES – PLEASE MEET WITH YOUR ADVISOR AND
CHECK THE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG FOR ALL COURSE OPTIONS IN EACH CATEGORY
LABORATORY SCIENCES (12 Hours; 3 courses with labs)
PHYS 1710-1730 (4 hours)
__________________
PHYS 2220-2240 (4 hours)
__________________
CHEM 1410-1430 (4 hours)
__________________
Must earn at least a “C” in 3 courses and a 2.5 GPA
MATHEMATICS (22 Hours)
MATH 1710 (4 hours)
__________________
MATH 1720 (3 hours)
__________________
MATH 1780 (3 hours)
__________________
MATH 2770 (3 hours)
__________________
MATH 2700 (3 hours)
__________________
MATH 2730 (3 hours)
__________________
MATH or SCIENCE ELECTIVE
__________________
Must earn at least a “C” in 2 courses and a 2.5 GPA
ORAL / ADVANCED WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS (6 Hours)
(Satisfies the University English II & Communications Requirement)
ENGL 2700 ______________(satisfies second English requirement)
GNET 2060 ______________(satisfies University requirement)
Must earn at least a “C” in both courses and a 2.5 GPA
ENGLISH (3 Hours)
ENGL 1310,1311,1312, or 1313
__________________
Second English fulfilled by ENGL 2700
UNITED STATES HISTORY (6 Hours)
HIST 2610-2620 or Honors equivalents. History 4700 (Texas History)
or any advanced US-Topic History course(s) may substitute for
either of the US History survey courses.
POLITICAL SCIENCE (6 Hours)
PSCI 1040_____ PSCI 1050_____
NOTE: If you are transferring credit for either PSCI course, please
check with your advisor. Do not assume that your “first“ course
elsewhere is the same as PSCI 1040. An out-of-state American
Government course cannot be equivalent to PSCI 1040 but may
be equivalent to PSCI 1050. Any advanced US- Topic Political
Science course may substitute for PSCI 1050 only.
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (3 Hours)
__________________
NOTE: The student is required to maintain a 2.75 GPA in all
advanced CSCE courses.
VISUAL / PERFORMING ARTS (3 Hours) __________________
COMPUTER SCIENCE and ENGINEERING (43 Hours)
HUMANITIES (3 Hours)
__________________
CSCE 1030 (4 Hours)
CSCE 1040 (3 Hours)
CSCE 2050 (3 Hours)
CSCE 2610 (3 Hours)
CSCE 3010 (3 Hours)
CSCE 3020 (3 Hours)
CSCE 3600 (3 Hours)
CSCE 3610 (3 Hours)
CSCE 3730 (3 Hours)
CSCE 4910 (3 Hours)
CSCE 4915 (3 Hours)
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
WELLNESS (3 Hours)
__________________
CSCE Specialty Elective
CSCE Specialty Elective
CSCE Specialty Elective
See page 15 for details
_________________
_________________
_________________
CROSS CULTURAL, DIVERSITY, & GLOBAL STUDIES (3 Hours)
_____________________
ENGINEERING (12 Hours)
ELET 2720
____________
ELET 3720
____________
ENGR 2405
____________
ELECTIVE COURSES (To reach 131 Hrs, 45 Advanced Hrs.)
Check with your advisor concerning elective courses
Technical Elective
Technical Elective
_________________
_________________
Any 3000 or higher level courses from any department in the
College of Engineering, College of Business, or the following
departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, Biology,
Chemistry, Economics, Mathematics, or Physics. Advisor approval
is needed.
13
Computer Engineering Specialty Area Electives
Specialization Area: Real-time and Embedded Systems
ELET 3750: Digital Systems (junior yr spring)
CSCE 4620: Real-Time Operating systems (senior yr fall)
And one more from the following:
CSCE 4730: VLSI Design (senior yr spring)
CSCE 4440: Real-Time Software Development (senior yr spring)
CSCE 4610: Computer Systems Architecture (senior yr spring)
Specialization Area: VLSI and Electronics
CSCE 4730: VLSI Design (senior yr fall)
CSCE 4750; VLSI Testing (senior yr spring)
And one more from the following:
CSCE 4610: Computer Systems Architecture (junior yr spring)
ELET 3750: Digital Systems (junior yr spring)
PHYS 4500: Introduction to Solid State Physics (junior yr spring)
Specialization Area: Communications and Networks
CSCE 3510: Introduction to Wireless Comm. (junior or senior yr)
CSCE 3530: Introduction to Computer Networks (junior yr spring)
And one more from the following:
CSCE 4520: Wireless Networks and Protocols (senior yr)
CSCE 4530: Computer Network Design (senior yr)
CSCE 4540: TCP/IP Protocols (senior yr)
Specialization Area: Computer Systems
CSCE 3650: Introduction to Compilation Techniques (junior or senior yr)
CSCE 4610: Computer Systems Architecture (junior or senior yr)
And one more from the following:
CSCE 3030: Parallel Programming (junior or senior yr)
CSCE 4600: Intro to Operating Systems (junior or senior yr)
CSCE 4620: Real-Time Operating Systems (senior yr)
14
Bachelor of Science Major in Computer Engineering
suggested four-year degree plan.
Students are encouraged to see their advisor each semester for program decisions and enrollment.
FRESHMAN YEAR
FALL
CSCE 1030 Computer Science I
ENGL 1310 or 1313 College Writing I
HIST 2610 United States History to 1865
MATH 1710 Calculus I
PHYS 1710 Mechanics
PHYS 1730 Laboratory in Mechanics
Total Hours
4
3
3
4
3
1
18
SPRING
CSCE 1040 Computer Science II
ENGL 2700 Technical Writing
HIST 2620 United States History since 1865
MATH 1720 Calculus II
PHYS 2220 Electricity and Magnetism
PHYS 2240 Lab in Electricity and Magnetism
Total Hours
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FALL
CSCE 2050 Computer Science III
ELET 2720 Digital Logic
ENGR 2405 Fundamentals of Elect. Engineering
GNET 2060 Professional Presentations
MATH 2700 Linear Algebra and Vect. Geom.
Total Hours
3
4
4
3
3
17
SPRING
CHEM 1410 General Chemistry
CHEM 1430 Laboratory for General Chemistry
CSCE 2610 Computer Organization
MATH 1780 Probability Models
MATH 2730 Multivariable Calculus
MATH 2770 Discrete Mathematical Structures
Total Hours
3
1
3
3
3
3
16
SPRING
CSCE 3020 Fund. of Comm. Theory
CSCE 3730 Reconfigurable Logic
ELET 3720 Electronics I
PSCI 1050 American Government
CSCE Specialty Area Elective
Total Hours
3
3
4
3
3
16
SPRING
CSCE 4915 Computer Engineering Design II
CSCE Specialty Area Elective
Technical Elective (advanced)
Cross-cultural, Diversity, and Global Studies
Humanities Elective
Total Hours
3
3
3
3
3
15
JUNIOR YEAR
FALL
CSCE 3010 Signals and Systems
CSCE 3600 Principles of Systems Programming
CSCE 3610 Machine Structures
PSCI 1040 American Government
Technical Elective (advanced)
Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective
Total Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
SENIOR YEAR
FALL
CSCE 4910 Computer Engineering Design I
CSCE Specialty Area Elective
Mathematics or Science Elective
Visual and Performing Arts Elective
Wellness
Total Hours
3
3
3
3
3
15
15
Pre-requisite Structure
BS in Computer Engineering
CSCE
Specialty
See Undergraduate
catalog for requirements
CSCE 4920
Co-op
CSCE 2900
Special
Problems
CSCE 1010
Intro to CS
Special Problems / Directed Study
See Undergraduate catalog for
requirements
CSCE
Specialty
Elective credit only
CSCE 4930
CSCE 4950
CSCE 4940
CSCE 4890
Maximum 6 hours credit in
these courses
Not for CSCE major credit
CSCE 4915
Design II
CSCE
Specialty
CSCE 3610
Machine
Structures
CSCE 4910
Design I
CSCE 3020
Comm.
Theory
See pg 15 for
Specialty
descriptions
Math 1780
Probability
Models
Math 2700
Linear
Algebra
Math or
Science
Elective
MATH 1100
College
Algebra
MATH 1010
Fund. of
Algebra
CSCE 3730
Reconfig.
Logic
ELET 3720
Electronics I
MATH 2770
Discrete
Math
CSCE 2050
CS III
MATH 1710
Calculus I
MATH 1650
Pre-Calculus
See math
department for
placement
before
registering for
your first math
course
CSCE 3010
Signals &
Systems
Math 2730
Calculus III
Math 1720
Calculus II
CSCE 3600
Systems
Program.
can be
concurrent
CSCE 1040
CS II
CSCE 1030
CS I
HIGH SCHOOL
ALGEBRA
ENGR 2405
Fund. Of
EE.
CSCE 2610
Computer
Organization
Can be taken
concurrently
ELET 2720
Digital Logic
Optional
Required for
BSCE
16
Frequently Asked Questions
Do I need to take CSCE 1010?
Absolutely Not! This course is for non-majors only. The first CSCE course you should take is CSCE
1030, unless you have received AP Exam or transfer credit for this course and the credit has been
approved by the undergraduate advisor.
What courses should I take now?
Although your actual course schedule is up to you, there are some tips and guidelines to think
about:
Regardless of your actual degree choice, you will have several required courses in Math, Science,
and English, plus the CSCE major courses. Getting started in each of those tracks early is generally
a good idea, so you will have the prerequisites out of the way in later semesters. You should
strongly consider taking CSCE 1030 your first semester if you have not received AP credit for the
course. You should also take whatever Math course your placement test results have
recommended for you.
Try to avoid loading your early semesters with all of your University core courses like Humanities,
Wellness, etc. Save a few of them for later semesters when you are taking more difficult upper
division courses in your major to give yourself a break.
Also remember that the higher course numbers may not be offered each semester. If you put all of
them off until your senior year, that year may become 2 years in order to complete all of the
required courses.
In order to meet the 45 hours of advanced courses requirement, try to select 3000 or 4000 level
courses when selecting electives to fulfill your non-major requirements. You do not have to wait
until your Junior or Senior year to register for one of these courses as long as you meet the
prerequisites, if any.
Be sure to look at the prerequisite flows for the appropriate degree on page 12 or 16 of your
orientation handout. You should also note the degree requirements worksheet (pages 6, 9 or 13)
and list of approved courses (pages 7 or 11) for satisfying the various core and elective
requirements. The handout also contains some sample semester schedules (pages 8, 10 or 14). Use
these as a guide, but remember your schedule will likely differ depending on your starting point in
Math, as well as your chosen electives.
Minor in Computer Science
An undergraduate minor in Computer Science requires a minimum of 18 hours of computer
science courses, including at least 6 advanced hours. Required courses are CSCE1030, 1040 and
2050. The six hours of advanced courses must be taken at UNT.
How can I get extra money?
Students who are Texas residents and enrolled for the first time in a Texas college or university in the
Fall of 1997 or later may be eligible for a $1000 rebate of tuition if they complete their first
bachelor’s degree having attempted no more than 3 hours in excess of the minimum number of
semester credit hours required to complete the degree. For additional information and to apply
for the rebate during the semester of application for graduation, contact the Registrar’s Office.
17
Tutorial and Academic Resources
Name
Location
Phone
Web Address
Career Exploration (see schedule of classes)
UCRS 2100
565-2051
www.unt.edu/catalogs/catsched.htm
Career Services and Career Library
UU 320
565-2105
www.unt.edu/secs/cs_home.htm
Center for Student Rights and Responsibilities
UU 319
565-2039
www.unt.edu/csrr/
Chemistry Resource Center
CHE 119
565-2556 or
565-2713
Computer Labs (Some General Access Labs
offer specialized equipment and software, but
most are available for use by all students.)
Art 232
BA 333, 334, & 335
CHIL 116 (Adaptive)
CHIL 255
GAB 330 and 550
www.gal.unt.edu/index.html
ISB 110 (in library)
MATT 309
MUS 238
TERR 220
WILLIS 134 (24 hrs)
WH 120
NTRP B129
565-2470
565-3139
565-4750
565-3460
565-2825 &
565-4170
565-3048
565-4379
565-3765
565-4755
565-2375
565-2871
391-6733
Counseling and Testing Service
UU 321
565-2741
www.unt.edu/cat
Deadlines (Add, Drop, Withdrawal, Incomplete,
Pass/No Pass, Graduation Application)
Academic Calendar
in Schedule of Classes
565-2111
www.unt.edu/catalogs/catsched.htm
Dean of Students
UU 216
565-2648
www.unt.edu/dos/
Discovery Project
HIGH 201
565-4754
www.coe.unt.edu/discovery/
Financial Aid and Scholarships
ESSC 228
565-2302 or
565-2016
essc.unt.edu/finaid
Learning Center - Study Skills and Volunteer
Tutoring
UU 323
369-7006
www.unt.edu/lc/
Libraries: (Recording available at 565-4111)
Willis
Science & Technology
Media Library
WILLIS
ISB
Research Park
CHIL 111
565-2411
565-2194
369-7200
565-2480
www.library.unt.edu/
Math Lab and Short-term Tutoring
GAB 234
565-2155
www.math.unt.edu/mathlab/index.html
Office of Disability Accommodation
UU 322
565-4323
www.unt.edu/oda/
Physics Instructional Center (PIC)
PHYS 209
565-3275
www.phys.unt.edu/PIC/
PSYC 1000
TERR 351
369-7883
Registrar
General Information
Graduation
Registration
Transcripts
ESSC 209
ESSC 210
ESSC 147
ESSC 209
565-2111
565-4625
565-2378
565-2344
www.admin.unt.edu/assist
Student Accounting –Tuition and Fees
ESSC 105
565-3225
www.admin.unt.edu/assist
Student Activities and Organizations
UU 216
565-3807
www.unt.edu/sac/
Student Employment
UU 320
565-2425
www.unt.edu/ses/
Student Ethnic Enrichment Center
UU 420
565-3424
www.unt.edu/edo/seec.htm
Student Government Association
UU 216
565-3850
www.unt.edu/sga/
Student Health and Wellness Center
SHWC
565-2333
www.unt.edu/shc/
Student Legal Advisor
KEND 162
565-2614
www.unt.edu/legal/
TASP Office
STOV 117
565-4403
www.unt.edu/tasp/
Writing Center/Student Use of English
(Grammar/Writing Hotline - 565-4311)
AUD 105
565-2563
For Additional Help Information Visit: www.unt.edu
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