A Training on Reflective Writing
developed by
The Collaborative for Teaching and Learning
In Partnership
With the Kentucky Department of Education
Summer 2008
Continue to next slide
As this training is developed to stand alone, it communicates best if
participants view the slides in the play slide show mode. The visuals and
texts are designed to come on the screen with timed animation. Clicking too
soon will cause the presentation to move to the next slide before all the
information is present. Each slide contains a “continue to next slide”
prompt when all the information for that slide has been presented.
To begin the “play slide show” mode, find the words Slide Show on the
toolbar at the top of the screen and click to get a drop down menu. Then find
“view show” and click.
Continue to next slide
This training contains excerpts from student work that serve as
examples of related criteria. The pieces were written by Kentucky
students and provided by the Kentucky Department of Education.
There are links throughout the training that will connect to the
complete pieces on the KDE website. You must have the internet
active on your computer in order to connect from this presentation.
When you click on one of the links, it will take you to the document that
contains the piece of reference. You will need to find the piece within the
document by using the page arrows on the tool bar. The narration on the
training slide will provide the page number for the piece of reference.
Continue to next slide to begin the Reflective Writing Training
The goals of this training are:
• To examine the issue of reflection and its implication for writing the
reflective piece for the writing portfolio.
•To enhance the capacity of the teacher to guide students in the area of
reflective writing.
•To offer teachers a tool to use in the classroom to support
instruction of reflective writing
•To give support to the understanding of reflective writing for the purpose of
scoring the reflective piece that is a part of the assessment portfolio.
Continue to next slide
Reflection is:
•Why did I do that?
•Who or what helped me know or do that?
•What did I learn from doing that?
•What barriers did I overcome?
•What did I learn about my weaknesses?
•What did I learn about my strengths?
•How can I do it better next time?
•Thinking
•Analysis
•And serious contemplation
Of past events
Continue to next slide
Reflective Writing
(for the purpose of the portfolio)
requires
thinking, analysis,
and
serious contemplation
about growth in writing
through literacy
development.
Continue to next slide
Reflective Writing
(for the purpose of the portfolio)
is an analysis
and evaluation
of personal
progress in writing
through literacy.
Continue to next slide
When writing, analyzing,
or scoring the reflective piece,
it is helpful to use
the “look-fors” that are
provided in the
reflective section of the
“Categories of Writing”
reference tool.
from KDE spring scoring training materials
Continue to next slide
Please consider the
following points
as possibilities
for inclusion in the
reflective piece.
Note that not
every item in the
“Categories” list needs
to be included in every
piece a writer produces.
Continue to next slide
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
REFLECTIVE
The following slides
will elaborate
each of the points
listed on the
reflective section
of the
“Categories of Writing”
reference
tool.
Continue to next slide
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring demonstrate the contemplation of the
writer’s literacy experiences (one or more strands)?
Writing
Reading
Speaking
Listening
Observing
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring demonstrate the contemplation of the
writer’s literacy experience which might include
the following?
Reflection on how
the writer was
influenced by other
peoples’ experiences
in literacy, such as:
teachers, parents, peers,
grandparents, etc.
Click to next side for an example.
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
The piece could demonstrate the influence of
other peoples’ experiences in literacy such as
teachers, parents, peers, grandparents, etc.
Dear Mommy,
Remember all those times you read Bernstein Bear books to
me. This helps show me how to be a fluent reader. I love the way
you change your voice when it comes time for Papa Bear to talk.
This also helps me be a better writer. Because I see how important
it is to use dialogue to make your writing more interesting.
Listening to the changes in your voice makes the story flow. That
flows from page to the reader like a movie on the screen.
The Bernstein’s use punctuation marks at the end of exciting
sentences which makes it interesting and fun to read. When you
read to me you and stop between each sentence for a second, it
shows me that you are a fluent reader. It helps me want to be a…..
Continue to next slide
Click here to see complete
piece in Reflective Exemplars,
4th Grade-page 12.
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring demonstrate the contemplation of the
writer’s literacy experience which might include
the following?
REFLECTIVE
Reflection on how
the writer was
influenced by
books the writer
has read or has had
read to him or her
Click to next side for an example.
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer..
Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
The reflective piece could demonstrate the
influence of books the writer has read or has
had read to him or her.
Excerpt from, “Open and Closed: My Life as a Writer”
After this book, the series goes on to tell about the recipients of the
letter and money. My writing is about self-esteem and wrecks. The One Last
Wish books have influenced me to write realistically. They are pretty much
as real to life as you can get. Maybe that’s why I enjoy reading Lurlene
McDaniel so much.
Click here to see the complete piece in
Reflective Exemplars 7th Grade-page 12.
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring demonstrate the contemplation of the
writer’s literacy experience which might include
the following?
REFLECTIVE
Reflection on how
the writer was
influenced by
an author’s or authors’
influence on
the writer’s thinking
Click to next side for an example.
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
The reflective piece could demonstrate an
author’s or authors’ influence on the writer’s
thinking.
Excerpt from “Dear Mom”
One intriguing characteristic the author Megan McDonald used in this Judy Moody
book series was cliffhangers. Cliffhangers make the reader have the desire to continue
reading. At the end of each chapter in the series, McDonald keeps her readers hanging
off the edge, wondering what’s going to happen next. For example, Megan McDonald
used cliffhangers in her book titled Judy Moody, M.D. The Doctor’s In! In the chapter
“M.D. = A Million Dollars,” Judy stole her brother, Stink’s, umbilical cord, which he
kept in a baby food jar on his closet shelf. Megan McDonald left the reader hanging at
the end of that chapter, causing them to wonder if Stink knew Judy took his umbilical….
Click here to see the entire piece. Page 3 of
Reflective Exemplars…4th Grade
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring demonstrate the contemplation of the
writer’s literacy experience which might include
the following?
REFLECTIVE
Reflection on how
the writer was
influenced by
a multimedia
experience
Click to next side for an example.
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
The reflective piece could demonstrate the
influence of multimedia experiences.
Excerpt from “A Tale of Two Towers: Reflections on Writing”
My interest and progression as a writer starts with my inspiration. While
other kids were being lulled to sleep with classic fairy tales, I was being read comic
books. Instead of watching Cinderella, I watched Star Wars, and I knew who Frodo
Baggins was before I could recognize Mickey Mouse. Knowing this, it should come as
no surprise to learn that the majority of my personal writing – writing that isn’t for a
class-- is filled with fantasy and science fiction elements.
Click here to read the entire piece, “A Tale of Two Towers”.
Page 3 of the Exemplar Set for 12th Grade
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing, or
scoring demonstrate the contemplation of the writer’s
literacy experience which might include the following?
REFLECTIVE
A rethinking of
the writer’s
own
experiences
with writing
over time
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Continue to next slide
The reflective piece could demonstrate the
influence of a rethinking of the writer’s own
experiences with writing over time.
Excerpt from “A Tale of Two Towers: Reflections on Writing”
For some high school students, writing is a painful process drawn out by
(what they believe to be) multiple unnecessary drills, erratic revisions, and critiques
that go unheard. When I began to take writing seriously and focus on the quality of
my writing rather than simply writing to complete an assignment, I realized that
being conditioned to write, read, and revise each piece that I had written did nothing
but build on and improve my writings. These processes only contributed to writing
that was structurally sound; it didn’t benefit the actual content of my writing. This is
why my growth as a writer isn’t best described through the various school related
tasks that have been assigned to me. The development of my writing proficiency
and my attitude towards it is most evident in my personal writing endeavors, those
that have been read by none but endlessly amended by me at any opportunity.
Click here to read the entire piece, “A Tale of Two Towers”.
Page 3 of the Exemplar Set for 12th Grade
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective
piece you are
writing, analyzing,
or scoring give
evidence of
the writer
analyzing his or
her own strengths
and areas
of growth in writing?
Continue to next slide for an example
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Analysis of strengths and growth in writing...
Excerpt from “Journal Entry”
I was a bit different with my writings in times before I made the acquaintance
with the BFG. I would write pages and pages, not knowing when to stop, and when I
finally did, I would have constant urges telling me to go on. To go on and continue
writing I would write detail after detail, and I didn’t give the reader enough time to think
or visualize for themselves. I know that it’s sometimes a good thing to let your entire
mind spill out, but I think I might have done it too much. I didn’t realize what pains the
reader could be going through. I wanted them to be jumping for joy rather than crying in
shame.
Click here to read the complete piece, “Journal Entry”. The author
continues to explain with specific details how his writing changed
from what is described above to more effective practice.
Reflective Exemplars, 7th Grade-page 3.
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective
piece you are
writing,
analyzing, or
scoring
allow the content to
determine the form
and audience?
Continue to next slide
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring allow the content to determine the form
and audience?
Did the writer choose an audience*
who would be the most interested
in his or her learning experiences
or who had an impact on his or
her growth as a writer?
*A writer can write “to or toward” an audience.
Click to continue slideshow
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring allow the content to determine the form
and audience?
Did the writer consider the
purpose and audience to
choose the most appropriate
and authentic form?
Click to continue slideshow
Does the reflective piece you are writing,
analyzing, or scoring allow the content to
determine the form and audience?
An essay may
address the
needs of a
more general
audience in a
reflective writing .
Click here to see the entire reflective essay:
“Open and Closed: My Life as a Writer”
page 12 of 7th Grade Reflective Exemplars
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective piece you are writing,
analyzing, or scoring allow the content to
determine the form and audience?
A letter to the reviewer is not a required form
for the reflective piece.
However, a letter might be the form that would best
meet the needs of a specific audience.
Click here to see an example of a reflective letter:
“Dear Mommy”, Page 12 of 4th Grade,
Reflective Exemplars
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective
piece you are
writing, analyzing,
or scoring
analyze and
address the needs
of the
intended audience?
Continue to next slide
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring analyze and address the needs of the
intended audience?
A writer demonstrates an awareness of the
audience’s needs by incorporating into the writing
what readers need to sufficiently understand the
meaning or purpose that may include the following:
•Sufficient background information
•Details
•Charts
•Bolded text
•Pictures
Taken from “Understanding the Language of the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric”
Continue to the next slide
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring analyze and address the needs of the
intended audience?
Any component of a piece of writing that is
necessary for a reader’s sufficient understanding
may be considered a demonstration of “awareness
of the audience’s needs.”
Taken from “Understanding the Language
of the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric”
Continue to the next slide for an example of this criteria applied.
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring analyze and address the needs of the
intended audience?
Detailed, Background Information
Puts aside readers’ expectations to tell them what
they need to
know instead
For some high school students, writing is a painful process drawn out by
(what they believe to be) multiple unnecessary drafts, erratic revisions, and critiques
that go unheard. When I began to take writing seriously and focus on the quality of
my writing rather than simply writing to complete an assignment, I realized that
being conditioned to write, read, and revise each piece that I had written did nothing
but build on and improve my writings. These processes only contributed to writing
that was structurally sound; it didn’t benefit the actual content of my writing. This is
why my growth as a writer isn’t best described through the various school related
tasks that have been assigned to me. The development of my writing proficiency….
Click here to read the annotations for the entire piece, “A Tale of Two Towers”. Find
other examples of the writer addressing the needs of the intended audience.
Page 5 of the Exemplar Set for 12th Grade
Click to continue slideshow
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring analyze and address the needs of the
intended audience?
Detailed, Background Information
The writer understands that there is a need to give the
audience detailed background information in order
for the remainder
of the essay
to make sense.
I read books about teens who face a deathly illness everyday, and no
one can seem to find a cure. In the first book of the One Last Wish series by
Lurlene McDaniel, Jenny Crawford is struggling with cancer. Jenny is told
that there is nothing else the doctors can do. With that, she is sent home with
medication and is told to wait until her time. Because she is in the bed all the
time, Jenny has a lot of time to think. She is very wealthy and wants to give
to those who suffer from illnesses similar to hers. Jenny decides to give one
Example from a 7th Grade Reflective Piece
Click here to see the complete annotation of this piece on page 7
of the 7thth Grade Reflective Exemplars.
Click to continue slideshow
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring analyze and address the needs of the
intended audience?
Detailed
Information
tells the
reader
specifics
about the
purpose..
how the
reader
has helped
the writer.
When you read Bernstein Bear books to me, I start getting
interested in reading group and in turn began to check out more
AR books from the library. I soon had better grades on my report
card in the reading slot! That is why I really enjoy you reading, it
ensures that I will get good grades like in reading and writing. I
have noticed that it’s easier to write down my thoughts because
you have helped me become a fluent reader. This also helps me in
completing my portfolio.
Example from a 4th Grade Reflective Piece
Click here to see the complete annotation of this piece
on page 15 of the 4thth Grade Reflective Exemplars.
Click to continue slideshow
Does the reflective
piece
you are writing,
analyzing,
or scoring
speak directly
to the audience?
(If indicated by the
purpose and the
form)
Click to continue slideshow
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Speaking directly to the audience is another way to meet the
needs of the audience. Not all reflective essays will speak as
directly to the audience as does the example below.
You might have heard of Alice Walker. This author is a wonderfully gifted
woman in literature. I first found Walker’s writing in a required Senior Writing Seminar
class. While studying her narrative “Beauty; When the Other Dancer Is the Self,” I
found her writing to be captivating. I was amazed at how she threw in so much
personality. Marveling at her use of long dashes, application of reflection, and ability to
connect with her readers inspired me to do the same.
Have you ever felt like you had something brilliant to say, but did not know
exactly how to say it?
Click here to read the entire piece, “Read, Practice, Imitate”
beginning on page 8 of the Exemplar Set
for 12th Grade.
Click to continue slideshow
Letters are more likely to speak directly
to a specific audience.
Dear Mommy,
Remember all those times you read Bernstein Bear books to
me. This helps show me how to be a fluent reader. I love the way
you change your voice when it comes time for Papa Bear to talk.
This also helps me be a better writer. Because I see how important
it is to use dialogue to make your writing more interesting.
Listening to the changes in your voice makes the story flow. That
flows from the page to the reader like a movie on the screen.
The Bernstein’s use punctuation marks at the end of exciting
Click here to see
“Dear Mommy”
Page 12 of
4th Grade
Reflective
Exemplars
sentences which makes it interesting and fun to read. When you
read to me you and stop between each sentence for a second, it
shows me that you are a fluent reader. It helps me want to be a
fluent reader also. Someday I want to write a story that flows from
the page to the reader like magic.
Click to continue slideshow
Does the reflective piece
you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring develop a
connection between
growth as a writer
Through a literacy
strand(s)—(reading,
listening,
speaking, observing
and writing) and
skills as a writer?
Click to next side for an example.
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring develop a connection between growth
as a writer through a literacy strand(s)- (reading,
listening, speaking, writing) and skills as a writer?
Have you ever felt like you had something brilliant to say, but did not know
exactly how to say it?
Before reading Walker’s narrative, I sometimes had a difficult time wording and
giving order to my thoughts. I wanted my writing to be different and eye-catching. Yet,
there was just one problem: I did not know how. By reading Alice Walker’s writing, I
learned how to get the reader’s attention. I learned how make my point known. I had
finally bumped my writing level up a level.
Though reading, practicing, and imitating Walker’s writing gave mine
personality, a public speaker, Bono—yes, the rock star—influenced my writing just as
much as Walker. I did not learn from Bono’s lyrics, but from a speech made at the fiftyFourth National Prayer Breakfast. Yes. We all know that Bono preaching to an assembly
of strong influential religious leaders of the world is a little out of his element. Even
Bono said, “I’m certainly not here as a man of the cloth, unless that cloth is—is leather.
I’m certainly not here because I’m a rock star—which leaves only one possible
explanation: I’ve got a messianic complex.” Bono uses humor in his speech, and it
works. His sense of humor makes his audience comfortable, yet at the same time he
knows when it is time to be serious.
Bono also recognizes his audience. Throughout his speech, he makes sure not…..
Click here to read the entire piece,
“Read, Practice, Imitate”
on page 8 of the Exemplar Set for 12th Grade.
Click to next slide for another example.
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring develop a connection between growth
as a writer through a literacy strand(s)- (reading,
listening, speaking, writing) and skills as a writer?
Dear Mommy,
Remember all those times you read Bernstein Bear books to
me. This helps show me how to be a fluent reader. I love the way
you change your voice when it comes time for Papa Bear to talk.
This also helps me be a better writer. Because I see how important
it is to use dialogue to make your writing more interesting.
Listening to the changes in your voice makes the story flow. That
flows from the page to the reader like a movie on the screen.
The Bernstein’s use punctuation marks at the end of exciting
sentences which makes it interesting and fun to read. When you
read to me you and stop between each sentence for a second, it
shows me that you are a fluent reader. It helps me want to be a
fluent reader also. Someday I want to write a story that flows from
the page to the reader like magic.
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective piece
you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring
analyze the connections
between growth
as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening,
speaking, observing,
and writing)
and skills as a writer?
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing, or scoring analyze
the connections between growth as a writer through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, speaking, writing) and skills as a writer?
Connecting reading to writing
Remember all those times you read Bernstein Bear books to
me. This helps show me how to be a fluent reader. I love the way
you change your voice when it comes time for Papa Bear to talk.
This also helps me be a better writer. Because I see how important
Analysis
it is to use dialogue to make your writing more interesting.
Listening to the changes in your voice makes the story flow. That
flows from the page to the reader like a movie on the screen.
The Bernstein’s use punctuation marks at the end of exciting
Connecting listening
to writing
sentences which makes it interesting and fun to read. When you
read to me you and stop between each sentence for a second, it
shows me that you are a fluent reader. It helps me want to be a
fluent reader also. Someday I want to write a story that flows from
the page to the reader like magic.
Therefore, when I read Bernstein Bear books I understand
Analysis
how using correct grammar makes your writing easier to read. It
Also helps me to be a better writer because if I use correct grammar..
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective
piece you are
writing,
analyzing, or scoring
support claims with
personal
experience
about self through
insight?
Continue to next slide for an example
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing, or scoring
supports claims with personal experience about self through
insight?
Click to read the entire annotation of the piece, “A Tale of Two Towers” which provides many
demonstrations of this criteria. Page 5 of the Exemplar Set for 12th Grade.
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective piece
you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring organize the
connections logically,
effectively
using paragraphing,
transitions, and
a variety
of sentences, etc.?
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring organize the connections logically,
effectively, using paragraphing?
Effective
paragraphing
organizes the
writer’s
thoughts
and moves
the reader
fluently
through the
piece.
Lurlene McDaniel inserts many forms of letters in her writing. It may
be a letter to a friend or one of the letters to the recipient of the money.
When she writes letters, it teaches me how I am supposed to write letters. I
have written letters for my transactive piece. My piece was about how we
should change Cats Prep back into Flex. I used a salutation, beginning,
middle, end, and a closing. She includes all of that in her letters.
Her letters have influenced me to write letters in my pieces. I think
that when I read letters in all of my books, you start to think that, this is what
you are supposed to do.
After this book, the series goes on to tell about the recipients of the
letter and money. My writing is about self-esteem and wrecks. The Last
Click here to read
“Open and Closed:
My Life as a Writer”
Page 12 of 7th Grade
Reflective Exemplars
Wish books have influenced me to write realistically. They are petty much
as real to life as you can get. Maybe that’s why I enjoy reading Lurlene
McDonald so much.
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring organizes the connections logically and
effectively, using transitions?
The following excerpt from the 12th Grade Reflective Exemplar, p. 8,
“Read, Practice, Imitate”, provides several examples of effective
transitions that help the reader to understand and move fluently
through the piece.
Have you ever felt like you had something brilliant to say, but did not know
exactly how to say it?
Before reading Walker’s narrative, I sometimes had a difficult time wording and
giving order to my thoughts. I wanted my writing to be different and eye-catching. Yet,
there was just one problem: I did not know how. By reading Alice Walker’s writing, I
learned how to get the reader’s attention. I learned how make my point known. I had
finally bumped my writing level up a level.
Though reading, practicing, and imitating Walker’s writing gave mine
personality, a public speaker, Bono—yes, the rock star—influenced my writing just as
much as Walker. I did not learn from Bono’s lyrics, but from a speech made at the fiftyFourth National Prayer Breakfast. Yes. We all know that Bono preaching to an assembly
of strong influential religious leaders of the world is a little out of his element. Even
Bono said, “I’m certainly not here as a man of the cloth, unless that cloth is—is leather.
I’m certainly not here because I’m a rock star—which leaves only one possible
explanation: I’ve got a messianic complex.” Bono uses humor in his speech, and it
works. His sense of humor makes his audience comfortable, yet at the same time he
knows when it is time to be serious.
Bono also recognizes his audience. Throughout his speech, he makes sure not…..
Click here to read the entire piece.
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring organize the connections logically and
effectively, using a variety of sentences?
The writer provides a listing of similar ideas with a variety
of sentence structures: complex, compound, and simple.
…..complement me on how I read aloud in class. The bear family
helps me to remember that characters have different voices and
tone. When I read I talk in a different voice for Momma Bear. Her
voice is quiet and low, just like you would imagine a mother bear
to have. I read with a different voice for Sister Bear and I read in a
low pitch voice. I model it after my active voice. For Papa Bear, I
read in a loud and grumpy voice. You know the kind of voice after
The writer also varied the order of the sentences to provide
interest for the reader.
Continue to next slide
Does the reflective
piece
you are writing,
analyzing,
or scoring
use grammar
and word choice
that is
appropriate
for purpose
and audience?
Click here to see an example
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writer…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Click to continue slideshow
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring use grammar and word choice that is
appropriate for purpose and audience?
The following excerpt from the 7h Grade Training Portfolio, p. 5,“Truth
or Fiction”, provides an example of effective grammar and word choice
that enhances the communication and that is appropriate for the
purpose and audience.
Click here to read entire piece
Click to next slide for another example
Does the reflective piece you are writing, analyzing,
or scoring use grammar and word choice that is
appropriate for purpose and audience?
The following excerpt from the 7h Grade Training Portfolio, p. 5,“Truth
or Fiction”, provides an example of effective grammar and word choice
that enhances the communication and that is appropriate for the
purpose and audience.
Click here to read entire annotated piece
Click to continue slideshow
How does the “Categories of Writing: Reflective”
connect to the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric?
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writing…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose
and
audience
Click to continue slideshow
The concepts in the green box connect
primarily to the content considerations.
REFLECTIVE
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writing…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Cells 3 and 4 of the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric
Content
Purpose and Audience;
Idea Development and Support
Click to continue slideshow
The concepts in the red box connect
primarily to the structure considerations.
REFLECTIVE
Cells 3 and 4 of the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writing…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Structure
Organization: Unity and coherence;
Sentences: Structure and length
Click to continue slideshow
The concepts in the blue box connect
primarily to the conventions considerations.
REFLECTIVE
Cells 3 and 4 of the Kentucky Writing Scoring Rubric
An analysis and evaluation of
personal progress in writing
through literacy
The writing…
•Contemplates his/her literacy
experience
•Analyzes own strengths and
areas of growth in writing
•Allows the content to determine
the form and audience
•Analyzes and addresses needs
of the intended audience
•Speaks directly to the audience
•Develops the connection
between growth as a writer
through a literacy strand(s)(reading, listening, observing,
speaking, writing) and skills
as a writer
•Analyzes the connections
•Supports claims with personal
experience about self through
insight
•Organizes the connections
logically, effectively, using
paragraphing, transitions, a
variety of sentences, etc.
•Uses grammar and word choice
that is appropriate for purpose and
audience
Conventions
Language: grammar and usage, word choice
Correctness: spelling, punctuation, capitalization,
abbreviation and documentation
Click to continue slideshow
What are other resources that support
reflective writing?
Click on the DVD below to view a video clip from the
DVD, Teaching the Writer, What Students Need.
The video segments are divided by chapters including
an introduction, “Three Types of Writing” (Chapter 1),
“Motivation,” (Chapter 2), “Prewriting,” (Chapter 3),
“Writer’s Craft,” (Chapter 4), “Revising and Editing,”
(Chapter 5) and “Next Steps.”
Troubleshooting: Make sure you have a media player
installed (e.g., Windows Media Player) to view the clips.
Continue to next slide
What are other resources that support
reflective writing?
Kentucky Writing Handbook:
Section on Reflective
Writing
Additions to handbook that
addresses questions relating
to Reflective Writing
What are other resources that support
reflective writing?
Kentucky Department of Education Webex on
Reflective Writing
When you go to the Webex link, look on the left margin for Attend a Session, under
that heading find: Recorded Sessions, click to go to Recorded Sessions screen and
scroll down to Reflective Writing, click to connect to the Webex.
You will get this screen
What are other resources that support
reflective writing?

http://education.ky.gov/users/otl/WR07mat/Reflective%2
0Writing%202007.ppt
This links to another powerpoint on Reflective Writing on
the KDE website

http://education.ky.gov/users/otl/WR07mat/Question
stoPromoteReflectiveThinkingaboutLiteracy.doc
This links to the document: “Questions to Promote Reflective Thinking
about Literacy”

http://www.education.ky.gov/KDE/Instructional+Resourc
es/High+School/English+Language+Arts/Writing/Writing
++Cluster+Leader+Training+Materials.htm
This links to all the Cluster Leader Training Materials..
Scroll down to explore all that is available.
Continue to next slide
What are other resources that support
reflective writing?
“Teaching the Writer, What Students Need”
is a DVD that provides support for the
teaching of writing through videos of
interviews and classroom examples.
The DVD should be available through your
Writing Cluster Leader. A viewing guide for
the DVD is on the CTL website:
www.ctlonline.org
Continue to next slide
Contact Information
Linda Leugers, Writing Consultant
[email protected]
Collaborative for Teaching and Learning
2303 River Road Suite 100
Louisville KY 40206 1010
Phone 502.895.9500 Toll Free
800.995.3965
Fax 502.895.9521 Email
[email protected]
Contact Information
Lee Ann Hager
High School Writing Consultant
Kentucky Department of Education
(502) 564-2106 extension 4514
Email: [email protected]
Descargar

Slide 1