SABOT
Standardized Auxiliary Boat
Operations Training
Ninth District - Eastern Region
COMO. Lew Wargo, Sr.
CQEC-9ER
01 APR 2015
RADIOTELEHONE
SABOT
RADIO
COMMUNICATIONS
REFERENCES
• Boat Crew Seamanship Manual,
COMDTINST M 16114.5(series), chapter 11
RADIOTELEPHONE HANDBOOK
Boat Forces Command (FORCECOM)
CGTTP 6-01, 1A
January 2013
USING THE
RADIOTELEPHONE
Some basics on using the VHF-FM Radio Telephone:
1. Know the radio set and how it works
2. Be alert
3. Speak in a confident tone (Speak SLOWLY, A deep
voice is easier to understand.)
4. Keep the mic out of the wind when talking.
USING THE
RADIOTELEPHONE
5. Key the mic before starting to talk
6. Release the mic after you finish talking
7. Release the “Push-to-Talk button after each
phrase or two to allow another station to breakin if necessary.
8. Ensure receiver volume is turned up enough to
detect signals, but not so loud as to damage
your hearing.
PROHIBITED
PRACTICES
1. Violating radio silence
2. Unofficial conversations between operators
3. Transmitting on a directed net without permission.
4. Excessive tuning or testing for more than 10
seconds.
5. Failure to listen before transmitting.
PROHIBITED
PRACTICES
6. Using other than authorized procedure words.
7. Unauthorized use of plain language in place of
procedure words.
8. Any other unauthorized use of plain language.
9. Profane language or loss of temper.
PHONETIC ALPHABET
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
ALPHA
BRAVO
CHARLIE
DELTA
ECHO
FOXTROT
GOLF
HOTEL
INDIA
AL-FAH
BRAH-VOH
CHAR-LEE
DELL-TAH
ECK-OH
FOKS-TROT
GOLF
HOH-TEL
IN-DEE-AH
PHONETIC ALPHABET
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
JULIETT
KILO
LIMA
MIKE
NOVEMBER
OSCAR
PAPA
QUEBEC
ROMEO
JEW-LEE-ETT
KEY-LOH
LEE-MAH
MIKE
NO-VEM-BER
OSS-CAH
PAH-PAH
KEH-BECK
ROW-ME-OH
PHONETIC ALPHABET
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
SIERRA
TANGO
UNIFORM
VICTOR
WHISKEY
X-RAY
YANKEE
ZULU
SEE-AIR-AH
TANG-OH
YOU-NEE-FORM
VIK-TAH
WISS-KEY
ECKS-RAY
YANG-KEY
ZOO-LOO
PHONETIC FIGURES
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
ZE-ROH
WUN
TOO
TREE
FOW-ER
FIFE
SIX
SEV-UN
AIT
NINE-ER
FIGURES
NUMBER
SPOKEN
• 44
FOW-ER, FOW-ER
• 500
FIFE, ZE-ROH, ZE-ROH
• 7000
SEV-UN, ZE-ROH, ZE-ROH, ZE-ROH
• 16,000
WUN, SIX, ZE-ROH, ZE-ROH, ZE-ROH
• 14,899
WUN, FOW-ER, AIT, NINE-ER, NINE-ER
FIGURES
• For a Decimal Point Say:
–DAY-SEE- MAL
To say: 123.6 speak:
WUN, TOO, TREE DAY-SEE-MAL , SIX
MIX of LETTERS
& NUMBERS
• To spell say: “I Spell”
• To give a string of numbers, say: “Figures”
• To give a mix of letters & numbers say:
– For: NY1234 say: “ I SPELL NO-VEMB-ER, YANGKEE, WUN, TOO, TREE, FOW-ER”
– For 129B say: “FIGURES, WUN, TOO, NINE-ER,
BRAH-VOH
DATES
• DATES:
• Speak dates digit-by-digit using month’s full name.
For 20 August say:
– “Too, Ze-Roh, August”
INITIALS
INITIALS:
. For W. E. Lewis, say:
“INITIALS, WISS-KEY, ECK-OH, LEWIS “
Speak the phonetic alphabet for personal
ROMAN NO.
ROMAN NUMBERS:
Precede roman numerals by the Phrase
“ROMAN NUMERALS”,
then transmit the Arabic numbers
PUNCTUATION
Punctuation
Mark
Spoken As:
• Colon (:)
COLON
• Comma (,)
COMMA
• Decimal Point (.)
DAY-SEE-MAL
• Hyphen (-)
HYPHEN
• Oblique stroke (/)
SLANT
PUNCTUATION
Punctuation
Mark
Spoken As:
• Parenthesis (( ))
• Period (.)
BRACKET ON/BRACKET OFF
PERIOD or FULL STOP
• Question mark (?)
QUESTION MARK
• Semicolon (;)
SEMI-COLON
RADIO USE
• To call or reply:
• 1. Check that you are on the proper channel
• 2. Listen to be sure there is no traffic on the channel
• 3. Speak clearly and slowly in a normal voice
holding the mic about 2” from your mouth and
out of the wind.
4.
Avoid excessive calling and unofficial traffic.
NOTE: (Transmit call sign only once if conditions are
favorable.)
RADIO USE
5. After unsuccessful attempts to contact a
station, transmit the proword “Nothing
Heard” or “Negative Contact”. Attempt again
after a reasonable interval.
6. Send a transmission at a speed that allows for
accurate message copying by the recipient.
Transmit the message phrase-by-phrase, unkeying the microphone at regular intervals.
RADIO
USE
• End every transmission with one of the following
prowords:
• OVER
Recipient response required.
• OUT
No response required.
• WAIT
Use for pauses that require more
than a few seconds.
• WAIT OUT
Use for pauses that require more
than a few seconds. I will call you
back.
RADIO CHECKS
• Conduct radio checks to test equipment or when
communication with another unit is doubtful. Make
radio checks on a Coast Guard working channel.
Radio checks on VHF channel 16 are illegal according
to FCC rules.
PRIORITY RADIO USE
• Distress communications have absolute priority
over all other transmissions.
• At times, a net control station (NCS) might impose or
lift radio silence on a directed net.
• Example: ALL STATIONS (3X) THIS IS _____ SILENCE
(3X). I SAY AGAIN (“SILENCE” is pronounced
“SEELONCE).
• ALL STATIONS (3X) THIS IS____ SILENCE LIFTED.(3X)
• “SILENCE” is pronounced “SEELONCE”.
PRIORITY RADIO USE
• Distress Call: “MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY”
• The proword “THIS IS (Unit’s name)”
• Give in order:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
The distressed unit’s position
Nature of distress,
Number of POBs,
Medical condition (if any), age of POBs if pertinent,
Description of vessel,
Any other information that may aid in the rescue.
• The receiving unit should acknowledge receipt of the
message (RECEIVED MAYDAY).
PRIORITY
RADIO USE
• Urgent Communications:
The urgency signal “PAN-PAN” (pronounced PAHNPAHN) indicates the calling station has an urgent
message to transmit concerning the safety of a ship,
an aircraft, other vehicle, or the safety of a person.
Message may be addressed to either a specific
station or to ALL STATIONS.
• Urgent communications have priority over all other
transmissions except distress. Exercise care not to
interfere.
PRIORITY
RADIO USE
• Safety Communications:
Safety broadcasts use the same procedures as
urgent communications. Use the safety signal
proword “Securite” pronounced (Say-Cur-i-Tay) (say
3X).
• Say “This is ______”,
• Give brief identifying message, (ex: Safety marine
broadcast) – Listen Channel ____, Out”.
COMMONLY USED
PROWORDS
ACKNOWLEDGE
Instructs recipient to acknowledge
BREAK
Indicates the separation of text from
other portions of the message.
CALL SIGN
The group that follows is a call sign.
CORRECT
You are correct
CORRECTION
An error was made in this
transmission, the correction is:
COMMONLY USED
PROWORDS
• DISREGARD
The transmission was in error,
disregard the message.
• EXECUTE
Carry out the intention of the
message or signal, followed by OUT.”
• EXEMPT
The station immediately following
this proword are exempted.
• FIGURES
Numerals or numbers follow.
COMMONLY USED
PROWORDS
FROM
Identifies the message originator.
I READ BACK
The following is my response to your
instructions to read back.
I SAY AGAIN
Use to repeat a portion of a
transmission.
I SPELL
Precedes a word spelled phonetically.
MESSAGE
The following message requires
recording.
COMMONLY USED
PROWORDS
NEGATIVE
No
NO PLAY
During an exercise, used to
distinguish real world activity.
NEGATIVE -
Used when there is no reply from
-CONTACT
station called.
OUT
No reply required or expected.
OVER
A reply is required or expected.
COMMONLY USED
PROWORDS
READ BACK
Repeat back as received
ROGER
I have satisfactorily received your last
transmission.
SAY AGAIN
Repeat all of your message.
SEND YOUR --
I am ready to receive your message.
SILENCE
Requires radio silence. Send no
traffic, Used in conjunction with a
MAYDAY case.
COMMONLY USED
PROWORDS
SILENCE LIFTED
Radio silence is lifted.
SPEAK SLOWER
Your transmission was too fast.
Reduce the speed at which you are
speaking.
THIS IS ______
Identifies the station
UNKNOWN -STATION
Used when trying to establish
communications with an unknown
station
COMMONLY USED
PROWORDS
WAIT
I must pause for a few seconds.
WAIT-OUT
I must pause for more than a few
seconds. I will call you back.
WILCO
I have received your message,
understand and will comply.
WORDS TWICE
Transmit each phrase twice.
WRONG
Your last transmission was incorrect.
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