COM 3: RadioTelephone Procedure
(RTP)
Prepared by JWT 2004
COM 3: Radio-Telephone
Procedure (RTP)
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Reasons for security
Rules for security
How to speak clearly
Radio discipline
The Phonetic Alphabet
Radio appointment titles
Ratel Procedure
The successful use of voice radio requires
 a standard ratel procedure,
 constant practice and
 good radio discipline.
Ratel Procedure
Ratel procedure is a set of simple rules based on
the principles of:
 Security,
 Accuracy, and
 Discipline.
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The principles of security, accuracy and
discipline can be remembered by the
mnemonic SAD.
Reasons for Radio
Security
 In a military situation, any enemy will
attempt to listen in to radio
communications. They will not only try to
find out any information, but also locate
units by identifying operators.
 Although Cadets does not operate under
the same security conditions as the army,
the same rules for radio security apply.
Rules for Radio Security
 Only authorised transmissions are to be made.
 The following practices are specifically
forbidden:
 violations of communications silence (radio,
electronic and emergency);
 unofficial conversation between operators;
 transmitting a person’s name;
Rules for Radio Security
 unauthorised use of plain language;
 use of plain language in place of suitable
prowords;
 use of jargon;
 obscene language.
Questions
 What does S.A.D. stand for?
 Why do we need radio security?
 What are some of the practices that are
forbidden on the radio?
Accuracy: How to Speak
Clearly
To avoid wasting time on repetitions and
corrections, ratel messages must be sent
clearly. Operators and users must
remember the following points:
 Hold the microphone close to the mouth
when transmitting.
 Use the correct manner of rhythm,
speed, volume and pitch (RSVP)
Accuracy: How to Speak
Clearly
 Rhythm. Keep a natural rhythm. Divide the
message into sensible phrases.
 Speed. Speech should be slightly slower than
for normal conversation.
 Volume. Speak only as loudly as in normal
conversation. Shouting results in a distorted
signal.
 Pitch. The voice should be pitched slightly
higher than usual.
Radio Discipline
Discipline is essential for the efficient working of
radio nets. The NCS operator, irrespective of
rank, is in charge of the net and is responsible
for radio discipline. Radio discipline includes:
 correct use of ratel procedure,
 use of the correct frequency, and
 constant radio watch by all stations on the net.
Radio Discipline
 Only one station may transmit at a time. To
prevent confusion, the following rules must be
obeyed:
 Before speaking, listen to ensure that the
frequency is clear to avoid cutting in on other
transmissions.
 Leave a short pause at the end of a
conversation.
 Answer all calls immediately and in the correct
order.
Questions
 What do the letters R.S.V.P. stand for?
 What are some of the elements of radio
discipline?
 How can you prevent confusion when
transmitting?
The Phonetic Alphabet
 When it is necessary to identify any letter of the
alphabet, the authorised phonetic alphabet to be used.
 Difficult words or groups within the text of plain text
messages may be spelled using the phonetic alphabet
and preceded by the prowords I SPELL.
 If the operator can pronounce the word to be spelled,
he will do so before and after the spelling to identify the
word, for example: Papadopoulos - I SPELL Papa
Alpha Papa Alpha Delta Oscar Papa Oscar Uniform
Lima Oscar Sierra - Papadopoulos.
The Phonetic Alphabet
A
Alpha
F
Foxtrot
B
Bravo
G
Golf
C
Charlie
H
Hotel
D
Delta
I
India
E
Echo
J
Juliet
The Phonetic Alphabet
K
Kilo
P
Papa
L
Lima
Q
Quebec
M
Mike
S
Sierra
N
November
T
Tango
O
Oscar
U
Uniform
The Phonetic Alphabet
V
Victor
W
Whisky
X
X Ray
Y
Yankee
z
Zulu
Questions
 Spell Camberwell in the phonetic
alphabet.
 Spell your surname in the phonetic
alphabet.
 Spell your street name in the phonetic
alphabet.
Radio Appointment Titles
 To avoid disclosing the level of a
headquarters by referring to specific
appointments, standard radio
appointment titles are used throughout
the Australian Defence Force (ADF).
These titles are not classified and only
conceal the level of the headquarters.
Radio Appointment Titles
The title is not to be qualified in any way except:
 to indicate appointments next in seniority, in which
case MINOR may be added, for example PRONTO
MINOR is the next most senior Signals Corps
representative;
 when it is necessary to distinguish between similar
appointment holders of different formations, MY,
YOUR, HIS, OUR or THEIR, may be used before the
title, for example, MY PRONTO, YOUR PRONTO or
OUR SUNRAY may be used before the title;
 when the call-sign may follow the title, for example,
STARLIGHT call-sign Zulu Three Four.
Radio Appointment Titles
Commander
SUNRAY
Second-in-command
SUNRAY MINOR
Adjutant
SEAGULL
Quartermaster
MOLAR
Signals
PRONTO
Transport
PLAYTIME
Medical
STARLIGHT
Questions
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Why are radio appointment titles used?
What does sunray mean?
What does sunray minor mean?
What does starlight mean?
What does pronto mean?
What does playtime mean?
Final questions?
 Look over your notes. There will be a
test of the material you have learnt in
this lesson.
 Now is your chance to ask final
questions.
COM 3: RadioTelephone Procedure
(RTP)
Prepared by JWT 2004
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Correct Use of RATEL Procedures - CGS-Cadets