Improving attainment and closing the gap:
The Power of Collective Effort and Professional Trust
Hartlepool Education Commission
23rd June 2014
Dr Kevan Collins
[email protected]
www.educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk
1
One corner of London…
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A few key points…
•
8 square miles, home to 260,000 people – highest wages in London for people who work in the
Borough but, lowest household income in the city for residents and people living in the Borough
•
The Borough has 74 primary, 18 secondary and 6 special schools. All but a handful (less than 5% of
the Borough’s children attend its schools)
•
The Borough spends on average, £7,500 per child on education services
•
The highest % of children in the country eligible for FSM (58%) and highest levels of child poverty in
the UK
•
Primary schools where 77% of the children arrive speaking English as an additional language. Over
90 languages are spoken in the Borough’s schools
3
Tower Hamlets and national 5 GCSEs A* - C including
English and mathematics
70
60
50
40
5 GCSEs A-C including English and
mathematics national
30
5 GCSEs A-C including English and
mathematics Tower Hamlets
20
10
0
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
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% of pupils achieving expected levels
at the end of primary education
100
90
80
70
% of pupils achieving Level 4 in English at the
end of Primary education national
60
% of pupils achieving Level 4 in English at the
end of Primary education Tower Hamlets
50
40
30
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
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How…
1.
Ambition - poverty isn’t an excuse for poor outcomes
2.
Sustained effort - improvement over time is key
3.
Leadership - change requires the skill and tenacity of key people
4.
Relationships – knowing and understanding the needs of others
5.
Partnerships – systems don’t improve school by school
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Critical Success Features (1)
Building Professional Trust – Within Schools
Three Stages of Development
A. Order, structure and a focus on learning
B. Development of educational capital
C. Focus on pedagogy and professional development
Two dominant models currently found in English Secondary Schools
A. Driven by accountability based on management, monitoring and targets
B. Driven by professional trust based on leadership and professional development
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Critical Success Features (2)
Building Professional Trust – Between Schools
Competing positions – healthy tensions…
A.Collaboration and competition
B. London challenge and new ideology of self interest
C. Local responsibility for failure and external new providers
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Applying evidence in practice
Step 1: Decide what you want to achieve
Identify school priorities using internal data and
professional judgement.
Step 5: Securing and spreading change
Mobilise the knowledge and use the findings to
inform the work of the school to grow or stop the
intervention.
Step 4: Did it work?
Evaluate the impact of your decisions and identify
potential improvements for the future.
Step 2: Identifying possible solutions
External evidence summarised in the Toolkit can
be used to inform choices.
Step 3: Giving the idea the best chance of success
Applying the ingredients of effective implementation.
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Applying evidence in practice
Step 1: Decide what you want to achieve
Generate a question using data, professional
judgement and values.
•
•
How can we engage and support struggling readers in Year 7?
How can we promote engagement and participation in
lessons?
Applying evidence in practice
Step 2: Identify possible solutions
Ensure that you start from the best position by
seeking internal and external knowledge.
•
•
Which programmes have been evaluated to be effective
in raising outcomes for struggling readers?
What evidence am I going to assemble to attend to the
issue?
Teaching and Learning Toolkit
• The Toolkit is an accessible, teacher-friendly summary of educational
research. ‘Which?’ for education
• Practice focused: tries to give schools
the information they need to make
informed decisions and narrow the
gap.
• Based on meta-analyses conducted by
Durham University.
The Toolkit is a starting point for making decisions
Applying evidence in practice
Step 3: Give the idea the best chance of success
Implementation matters: have you thought about what the approach means
for teaching and learning?
•
What are the research informed ‘active ingredients’ in our approach to
promote engagement and participation?
•
Are we equipped to deliver the reading programme with fidelity?
CPD and professional capacity
?
Resources, time and materials
How big is the practice and mindset
leap?
Is there disruption to other learning?
Implementation matters: how is as important as
what the evidence says
In the US, healthcare workers failure to wash hands effectively is major cause of death –
$billions
Researcher created a checklist for surgical teams. Trial showed 66% reduction in infection
rates, ~1500 lives in 18 months. Packaged the principles of handwashing into a practical
intervention.
Shortage of practical vehicles (interventions, CPD training) to help get evidence
working in practice, at scale and with rigour (eg AfL)
Applying evidence in practice
Step 4: Put energy into evaluation
Did the approach work, what made it work, and how can
it be improved next time?
• Can we demonstrate that our readers are making
progress?
• How will we measure the impact of our new approach to
promote engagement?
Applying evidence in practice
Step 5: Making innovation stick
Moving from what we know to what we do.
•
•
•
Have we secured the capacity to sustain the provision?
Have we assembled the resources and will to sustain the change?
Is the new provision integrated into our performance management
processes?
Applying evidence in practice
Step 1: Decide what do you want to achieve
Identify school priorities using internal data
and professional judgement.
Step 5: Securing and spreading change
Mobilise the knowledge and use the findings
to inform the work of the school to grow or stop
the intervention.
Step 4: Did it work?
Evaluate the impact of your decisions and
identify potential improvements for the future.
Step 2: Identifying possible solutions
External evidence summarised in the Toolkit
can be used to inform choices.
Step 3: Giving the idea the best chance of success
Applying the ingredients of effective
implementation.
Opportunities and Threats
Competition and collaboration
Importance of assured trust:
• Pupil admissions practice
• Allocation of resources
• Credibility of local leaders
• Risk of fragmentation as external agencies create alternative school
networks
• National determination of ‘best’ schools
• Collaboration being used to drive a ‘political’ agenda
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Opportunities and Threats
Accountability and autonomy
Risk of narrow accountability levers
A.Inspection OFSTED – crowding out personal responsibility and trust
B. League tables and high stakes tests – risk of gaming and skewed curriculum
Both encourage focus on individual as opposed to collective achievement
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Concluding Thoughts
No answers, enduring tensions…
•
•
•
•
•
accountability and improvement
autonomy and templates
competition and collaboration
qualifications and engaged learners
trust and compliance
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Tower Hamlets