Simple, Compound, and
Complex Sentences
Know the difference between compound
and complex sentences and how to write
them.
© 2008, TESCCC
6th Grade English Language Arts, Unit: 6, Lesson: 2
Simple Sentences
(independent clauses)
A simple sentence contains a subject, a
verb, and expresses a complete
thought.
The dog barks.
The cat screeches.
The bird flies away.
© 2008, TESCCC
6th Grade English Language Arts, Unit: 6, Lesson: 2
Simple Sentences
(independent clauses)
The sentences below are still simple sentences because there is still only one verb.
The dog barks loudly at the mail carrier
Deep in the middle of the night, the cat shrieks a dreadful melody.
After its bath, the bird flew away.
© 2008, TESCCC
6th Grade English Language Arts, Unit: 6, Lesson: 2
Compound Sentences
Compound sentences are two or more simple
sentences joined by a coordinator.
The dog barks.
The cat screeches.
The bird flew away.
What would you do to make one sentence from these three simple sentences?
Many people would just add “and”.
The dog barks and the cat screeches and the bird flew away.
© 2008, TESCCC
6th Grade English Language Arts, Unit: 6, Lesson: 2
Compound Sentences
Compound sentences are two or more simple sentences joined by a coordinator.
The coordinators are: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so
The dog barks and the cat screeches and the bird flew away.
Notice, this sentence has three independent
clauses in it, this means each sentence will
make sense on its own.
© 2008, TESCCC
6th Grade English Language Arts, Unit: 6, Lesson: 2
Compound Sentences
Compound sentences are two or more simple sentences joined by a coordinator.
The coordinators are: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so
However, it is quite boring to
read endless sentences linked
with “and” or “and then”
The dog barks and then the cat shrieks and then the bird flies away and then
the picture got ruined and it made me mad and I yelled at the dog.
© 2008, TESCCC
6th Grade English Language Arts, Unit: 6, Lesson: 2
Compound Sentences
Compound sentences are two or more simple sentences joined by a coordinating conjunction.
The coordinating conjunctions are: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so
However, there are other coordinating conjunctions: if, because,
unless, when, although. These are especially useful to show the
relationship between the two ideas in the independent clauses.
The dog barks because it is hungry.
The cat shrieks if it is threatened by the dog.
The bird flew away, although it didn’t go far.
© 2008, TESCCC
6th Grade English Language Arts, Unit: 6, Lesson: 2
Complex Sentences
A complex sentence is made of an independent clause and a dependent
clause. A dependent clause is a clause that will not make sense on its
own. A complex sentence always has a subordinator such as because,
since, after, although, or when or a relative pronoun such as that, who
or which.
Examples of dependent clauses:
when he went home
since she spent all her money
Notice, these make no sense on
their own, they beg for more
information.
although he finished his studies
He finished all of his chores when he went home.
She couldn’t buy the red shoes since she spent all her money.
Although he finished his studies, he was still worried about his grade.
© 2008, TESCCC
6th Grade English Language Arts, Unit: 6, Lesson: 2
Complex Sentences
When a complex sentence begins with a subordinator, a comma
is required at the end of the dependent clause
Although he finished his studies, he was still worried about his grade.
Because it was a beautiful day, I decided to go to the beach to take
pictures.
When the movie was over, the family decided to go to the pizza place.
© 2008, TESCCC
6th Grade English Language Arts, Unit: 6, Lesson: 2
Complex Sentences
When the independent clause begins the sentence and the
subordinators are in the middle, no comma is needed.
He was still worried about his grade although he finished his
studies.
I decided to go to the beach to take pictures because it was a
beautiful day.
The family decided to go to the pizza place when the movie was
over.
© 2008, TESCCC
6th Grade English Language Arts, Unit: 6, Lesson: 2
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Simple, Compound, and Complex Sentences (Lesson 4)