The Revised English Language
Proficiency Standards (ELPS)
with Sheltered Instruction
Presented by the Texas Education Agency
in collaboration with Region One Education Service Center/
LEP Instructional Excellence Center: Project Tesoro
May 2008
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Statutory Requirement
Newly approved
19 Texas Administrative Code §74.4
Chapter 74. Curriculum Requirements
Subchapter A. Required Curriculum
§74.4 English Language Proficiency Standards
Adopted December, 2007
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Chapter 74.4. English Language Proficiency Standards
(a) Introduction
(1) The English language proficiency standards in this
section outline English language proficiency level
descriptors and student expectations for English
language learners (ELLs).
School districts shall implement this section as an
integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.
The English language proficiency standards are to be
published along with the Texas Essential Knowledge
and Skills (TEKS) for each subject in the required
curriculum.
TEA Source: Newly Adopted Required Curriculum,
adopted on December 25, 2007.
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E.L.P.S.
(2) In order for ELLs to be successful, they
must acquire both social and academic
language proficiency in English. Social
language proficiency in English consists of
the English needed for daily social
interactions. Academic language
proficiency consists of the English needed
to think critically, understand and learn
new concepts, process complex academic
material, and interact and communicate in
English academic settings.
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Social vs. Academic Language
Social Language
Academic Language
Simpler language (shorter
sentences, simpler
vocabulary and grammar)
Usually face-to-face, small
number of people, informal
settings
Precise understanding is
seldom required
Usually simpler, familiar topics
(movies, friends, daily life)
Get many clues from expressions, gestures
social context
Many opportunities to clarify (look puzzled,
ask questions, etc.)
Technical vocabulary; written material has
longer sentences and more complex
grammar
Often lecture-style communication
or reading a textbook; little situational
context
Precise understanding and
description/explanation is required;
higher-order thinking
New and more difficult to understand
topics, knowledge is often abstract;
cognitively complex; student often has
less background knowledge to build on
Fewer clues, most clues are language clues
such as further explanation
More difficult to clarify
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Language Acquisition
Language
Development
Social and
Cultural Processes
Cognitive
Development
Academic
Development
(Collier, 1995)
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E.L.P.S.
(3) Classroom instruction that effectively
integrates second language acquisition
with quality content area instruction
ensures that ELLs acquire social and
academic language proficiency in
English, learn the knowledge and skills in
the TEKS, and reach their full academic
potential.
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E.L.P.S.
(b) School district responsibilities. In fulfilling
the requirements of this section, school
districts shall:
(1) identify the student's English language
proficiency levels in the domains of
listening, speaking, reading, and writing in
accordance with the proficiency level
descriptors for the beginning, intermediate,
advanced, and advanced high levels
delineated in subsection (d) of this section;
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E.L.P.S.
(2) provide instruction in the knowledge and
skills of the foundation and enrichment
curriculum in a manner that is linguistically
accommodated (communicated, sequenced,
and scaffolded) commensurate with the
student's levels of English language
proficiency to ensure that the student learns
the knowledge and skills in the required
curriculum;
(3) provide content-based instruction including
the cross-curricular second language
acquisition essential knowledge and skills in
subsection (c) of this section in a manner
that is linguistically accommodated to help
the student acquire English language
proficiency; and
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E.L.P.S.
(4)
provide intensive and ongoing foundational
second language acquisition instruction to ELLs
in Grade 3 or higher who are at the beginning
or intermediate level of English language
proficiency in listening, speaking, reading,
and/or writing as determined by the state's
English language proficiency assessment
system. These ELLs require focused, targeted,
and systematic second language acquisition
instruction to provide them with the foundation
of English language vocabulary, grammar,
syntax, and English mechanics necessary to
support content-based instruction and
accelerated learning of English.
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Cross-curricular
Essential Knowledge and Skills
(c) Cross-curricular second language acquisition
essential knowledge and skills.
(1) Cross-curricular second language
acquisition/learning strategies. The ELL uses
language learning strategies to develop an
awareness of his or her own learning
processes in all content areas. In order for the
ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations
across the foundation and enrichment
curriculum, all instruction delivered in English
must be linguistically accommodated
(communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded)
commensurate with the student's level of
English language proficiency.
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Cross-curricular
Essential Knowledge and Skills
The student is expected to:
(A) use prior knowledge and experiences to
understand meanings in English;
(B) monitor oral and written language production and
employ self-corrective techniques or other
resources;
(C) use strategic learning techniques such as
concept mapping, drawing, memorizing,
comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire
basic and grade-level vocabulary;
(D) speak using learning strategies such as
requesting assistance, employing non-verbal
cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution
(conveying ideas by defining or describing when
exact English words are not known);
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Cross-curricular
Essential Knowledge and Skills
(E) internalize new basic and academic language by
using and reusing it in meaningful ways in
speaking and writing activities that build concept
and language attainment;
(F) use accessible language and learn new and
essential language in the process;
(G) demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish
between formal and informal English and an
increasing knowledge of when to use each one
commensurate with grade-level learning
expectations; and
(H) develop and expand repertoire of learning
strategies such as reasoning inductively or
deductively, looking for patterns in language, and
analyzing sayings and expressions
commensurate with grade-level learning
expectations.
Total student expectations 8
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Cross-curricular
Language Domains
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
Cross-curricular second language
acquisition/listening. (9 SE)
Cross-curricular second language
acquisition/speaking. (10 SE)
Cross-curricular second language
acquisition/reading. (11 SE)
Cross-curricular second language
acquisition/writing. (7 SE)
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Five E.L.P.S. Strands
Learning Strategies
Writing
Listening
ELPS
Reading
Speaking
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What does it look like?
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Needs of English Language Learners
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Effective teachers providing:
 Affective support
 Cognitive support
 Linguistic support based on
language acquisition research
Focused instruction
 Modified texts
 Modified and differentiated
instruction
 Opportunities to demonstrate
mastery of knowledge and
skills
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What Teachers Need to Know
About Second Language Learning
Acquisition-Learning Hypothesis
The Affective Filter Hypothesis
The Input Hypothesis
The Natural Order Hypothesis
The Monitor Hypothesis
S. D. Krashen
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What Teachers Need to Know
About Second Language Learning (cont.)
Cognitively Undemanding
1
2
Developing survival vocabulary
Engaging in telephone conversations
Following demonstrated
directions
Reading and writing for personal
purposes: notes, lists, sketches, etc.
Context Embedded
(Concrete)
Context Reduced
(Abstract)
Participating in hands-on science
and mathematics activities
Understanding academic presentations
without visuals or demonstrations: lectures
Making maps, models, charts, and
graphs
Solving math word problems without
illustrations
Solving math computational
problems
Taking standardized achievement tests
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Cognitively Demanding
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What Teachers Need to Know
About Second Language Learning (cont.)
BICS
CALP
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BICS vs CALP
Which language do we use more often?
BICS
Science
Math
Soc. Studies
Guess
Rules
Hypothesis
Estimate
Speculation
Laws
Subtract
Same
Identical
Method
Plan
Justice
Numerous
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Sheltered Instruction
Sheltered Instruction is an approach
to instruction and classroom
management that teachers can use
to help English language learners
acquire and learn English and
content area knowledge and skills.
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Characteristics of Sheltered Instruction
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Comprehensible input
Affective environment
High levels of student interaction, including
small-group and cooperative learning
Student-centered
More hands-on tasks
Careful, comprehensive planning, including
selecting key concepts from core curriculum
(Echevarria & Graves, 1998)
Adapted from: Building Connections in the Content Areas through Sheltered Instruction
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Characteristics of Sheltered Instruction
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Well-planned lessons
Use of student background knowledge and
experience
Variety of delivery modes
Grade-level content
Checks for understanding
Use of higher-order thinking skills
Explicitly-stated lesson objectives
(Echevarria & Graves, 1998)
Adapted from: Building Connections in the Content Areas through Sheltered Instruction
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Program Characteristics
Sheltered Instruction
Not Sheltered Instruction
•Accelerated Instruction
•High Expectations
•Effective Instruction +
•Purposeful and Intentional
•Provided by content
experts with shared
responsibility of second
language acquisition
•Instructional Approach
•Remediation
•Dumping Ground
•“Just Good Teaching”
•Hit and Miss
•Responsibility of ESL
teacher
•ESL students in all
sheltered classes
•Scheduling requirement
•Program
Adapted from: Building Connections in the Content Areas through Sheltered Instruction
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Use of Appropriate Strategies
and Teaching Methods
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Frayer Model
Cloze Procedure
Hands-on Experiences
Instructional Conversation
Use of Cognates
Hands-on Experiences
Manipulatives (Concrete
Representations)
Language Experience Approach (LEA)
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Use of Cognates
important
importante
doctor
doctor
biology
biología
part
parte
moment
momento
execution
ejecución
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The Five E Model
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Engage – provide activity to draw interest (teacher-directed
activity)
Explore - hands on, discover on their own to construct new
knowledge (teacher guided)
Explain – students explain the procedures of the experiment &
observations (teacher guided)
Elaborate – observe, make predictions, generalize rules for objects
of the experiment, make a model, etc (teacher monitors,
facilitates discussion)
Evaluate – complete assessment, complete performance task
(teacher evaluates progress and students assess themselves)
Source: Adapted from Bybee, R. W. et al. (1989)
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Second Language Acquisition Strategies
Beginning Level
Intermediate Level
Advanced Level
Cooperative Groups
Concrete, Manipulatives and Visuals
TPR
Daily News
Non-Verbal Role Playing
level
Rhymes, Chants, Songs, Games
Hands-on Projects
Cloze activities
Choral Reading
Pre-recorded Stories
Author’s Chair
Label
Word banks
Think-pair-share
Silent reading
Role Playing (Verbal)
Reading & Writing on grade
Reading, Writing, Reciting Evaluating
Group Discussions
Retelling Stories
Dialogue Journals
Graphic Organizers
Summarize
Compare/contrast
Read Aloud
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Predicting Outcomes
Supporting
Analyzing Charts
Analyzing Graphs
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Connection to TELPAS
The newly adopted English language proficiency
standards are closely aligned with the Texas
English language proficiency assessments
(TELPAS).
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Together, the standards and assessments promote
the English acquisition that ELLs need to succeed
academically.
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Effective implementation of the ELP standards
should support not only better English acquisition
but better academic achievement, which should be
evident in state assessment results.
Source: TEA Assessment Division
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Connection to TELPAS cont’d
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TELPAS assesses the English language
proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and
writing of K-12 ELLs
TELPAS measures how well ELLs understand
and use English for everyday use and academic
purposes.
TELPAS reports four English language
proficiency levels:

Beginning
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Intermediate
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Advanced
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Advanced High
*Meets Requirements of NCLB
Source: TEA Assessment Division
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Key Features of Each Proficiency Level
Listening Speaking Reading
Writing
Beginning Level: Little or no ability, uses high frequency, routine
words; in writing, typically lists, labels, copies.
Intermediate Level: Limited ability, understands and uses short,
simple sentences. Uses present tense.
Advanced Level: Typically have grasp of basic verbs, tenses,
grammar features and sentence patterns/ partial grasp of more
complex verbs, tenses, grammar features and sentence patterns,
needs support
Advanced High Level: Ability, with minimal support very close to
native English speaking peers
Source: TEA Assessment Division
http://www.tea.state.tx.us/studen.assesment/admin/rpte/Training_on_the_2_12
_PLDs_Sp_08_final.ppt
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Academic Listening Sample
Good morning, class. Today we are going to study
something brand new. It’s difficult, so I’m going to need
everyone’s undivided attention. Open your books to
page one hundred seventy-two. At the top of the page is
the word “net.” Today’s lesson is about net. As it says in
the definition in your book, in math, net is a twodimensional model. The net of a cylinder is shown in
your textbook. Does everyone see the rectangle and two
circles? That’s the net of the cylinder.
What Might a Beginning Listener Understand?
TEA Assessment Division
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Academic Listening Sample
Good morning … Today … Open your books
to page one … top … page … Today’s …
book … math … two … book … rectangle …
two circles …
Beginning level
TEA Assessment Division
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Academic Listening Sample
Good morning, class. Today we are going to study … It’s
difficult … going to need everyone’s … Open your books
to page one hundred … top of the page … Today’s lesson
… your book, in math … two … cylinder … book …
rectangle and two circles … cylinder.
Intermediate level
TEA Assessment Division
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Academic Listening Sample
Good morning, class. Today we are going to
study something … new. It’s difficult, so I’m
going to need everyone’s … Open your books
to page one hundred seventy-two. At the top
of the page is the word … Today’s lesson is …
definition in your book, in math, net is a two
… a cylinder is … in your textbook. Does
everyone see the rectangle and two circles?
… cylinder.
TEA Assessment Division
Advanced level
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Academic Listening Sample
Good morning, class. Today we are going to study
something brand new. It’s difficult, so I’m going to
need everyone’s undivided attention. Open your books
to page one hundred seventy-two. At the top of the
page is the word “net.” Today’s lesson is about net.
As it says in the definition in your book, in math, net
is a two-dimensional model. The net of a cylinder is
shown in your textbook. Does everyone see the
rectangle and two circles? That’s the net of the
cylinder.
Advanced High level
TEA Assessment Division
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Modified Texts Appropriate for Language
Proficiency and Reading Level
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Teachers can modify texts to make content
more comprehensible for their students by:
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Using graphics
Using outlines
Rewriting the text
Using audio recordings
Providing demonstrations
Using alternate books or materials
(Echevarria & Graves, 1998)
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Modified and Differentiated Assignments
Based on Language Proficiency
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Teachers can modify assignments so that a
distinction can be made between the
student’s content knowledge and language
proficiency by:
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Simplifying the objectives
Asking the students to draw or use pictures
Using oral discussions in pairs or small
groups
Modifying the length and difficulty of the
assignments
(Echevarria & Graves, 1998)
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Collaboration
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ESL and content area
teachers benefit from
collaborative efforts to
design and implement
effective lesson strategies
for English language
learners.
Teachers in the
collaborative effort must be
comfortable with giving and
receiving constructive
criticism.
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Scaffolding
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Scaffolding is a means by
which students receive support
in various forms from their
teachers in an effort to promote
skills and understanding,
eventually resulting in student
independence through the
careful reduction of support as
students make progress.
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Pink Handout page 1
How Teachers Can Support
ELLs in Their Classrooms
Share one thing that you learned about
supporting ELLs that you did not know.
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Pink Handout pages 2-3
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What Teachers Need to Know About
Second Language Learning
What Teachers Know About ELLs
Acquisition of Literacy
Summarize the two pages
Report your summary to the whole
group
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Planning for Sheltered
Instruction
Strategies
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Frayer Model
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Frayer Model: requires students to define words that will help
them to better understand content concepts. For students with
lower levels of proficiency, pictures may be used to support
understanding.
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
 Can be done in pictures and words
 Provides details about the term or concept through
the characteristics
 Uses examples and non-examples to provide
clarity
 Allows clarifications in the native language to be
made
 Can be done cooperatively, providing needed
interaction
 Can be used as an assessment tool
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Concept Attainment
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Concept Attainment: is the “search for and listing of words that
can be used to distinguish exemplars from nonexemplars of various
concepts.” An excellent strategy for helping students problem-solve
and learn vocabulary and content area concepts based on their
critical attributes.
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
 Can be done with pictures
 Can be done orally
 Enables students to grasp key concepts
 Encourages oral responses
 Allows students to make their own concept
attainment charts
 Serves as an alternative assessment tool
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Features Analysis
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Feature Analysis: is a procedure that helps students make fine
discriminations between concepts and/or facts. Students are also
able to get a bird’s eye view of the facts and ideas learned in a
global, and for English language learners, more accessible manner.
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
 Utilizes pictures in place of words
 Provides content through another pathway other than
text
 Can be cooperative
 Can be done as a hands-on/manipulative activity
 Lowers the affective filter
 Can be used to summarize a chapter
 Can be used as an assessment tool
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Anticipation Guide
Agree
Disagree
This photograph was
taken after a
tornado.
This city is located
along a coast.
There was no loss of
life because of this
storm.
The storm that hit this
city was named
Andrew.
People were able to
evacuate before
the storm.
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Anticipation Guide: enables students to make predictions and
use their background knowledge related to the topics introduce
in the class. It is advantageous to ensure that selected items
for an anticipation guide make content concepts explicit.
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
 Involves generalizations that provide accessibility for
all students
 Activates and validates students’ backgrounds
 Involves low task orientation
 Maintains strong likelihood of instructional
conversations
 Allows meaning to be explored and negotiated
 Can be done orally and with pictures
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Two Column Notes
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Two Column Notes/T-Charts: help students organize information
from reading assignments, lectures, and videos.
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
 Utilizes organization style that makes knowledge
more accessible
 Allows columns to be added to include visual
representations
 Encourages notes to be done in pictures
 Functions as a study aid
 Builds vocabulary in meaningful contexts
 Can be done cooperatively
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Window Paning
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Window Paning: is a great strategy for organizing steps to a
process, helping students to remember important concepts,
or just remembering vocabulary words.
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
 Conveys much information through visuals and
little print support
 Can be cut into parts and reassembled again to
demonstrate comprehension of a process
 Can be used as an effective study aid
 Can be created in cooperative groups
 Can be used for assessment
 Uses M-space theory- the brain can remember 7
plus/minus 2 pieces of isolated information at a
time
 Is parallel to brain-based theories
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Find Someone Who
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Find Someone Who: This strategy can be a great way to lower the
affective filter when academic elements are combined with
everyday student trivia in a questionnaire format.
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
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Allows all students to participate and answer questions
Encourages students to begin teaching each other
Is highly cooperative and jigsaw-like
Uses informal pathways to get prerequisite information out to
the students
Allows native language support to occur in a natural and
supportive way
Extends opportunities for oral language/practice
Is highly motivating
Encourages students to use background knowledge and
experiences
Serves as a vocabulary builder
Provides opportunities to negotiate meaning
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Foldables
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Foldables: These structures can be used to organize parts to whole
by providing topics, definitions, examples, situations, and/or
pictures for easy access to content knowledge and skills. The
tactile nature of foldables provides novelty and fun for all students.
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
 Lowers the affective filter
 Is novel, fun
 Can use as a study aid
 Serves as a good vocabulary builder/word bank
 Utilizes a tactile approach that is recommended
for strugglers
 Can use pictures in place of print
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Characterization Chart
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Characterization Chart: is an organizer that helps students analyze
the complete nature of a character.
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
 Can be done cooperatively
 Can be done as a hands-on/manipulative way
of assembling pieces
 Can be done with pictures/few words
 Provides lots of information in one place (bird’s
eye view)
 Can be used for assessment
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Words Across Contexts
What would the word axis mean to--a mathematician?
an astronomer?
a gardener?
a historian?
A chiropractor?
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Words Across Contexts
What would the word scale mean to--
a fisherman?
a person who plays the piano?
a mountain climber?
a physical fitness trainer at a gym?
a cartographer?
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Words Across Contexts: emphasizes words in certain contexts. It
also encourages content areas to acknowledge what academic
vocabulary is universal to the content area or particular to the
content area.
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
 Helps with words with multiple meanings
 Can be done with pictures and words
 Provides details on a concept through
characteristics
 Use examples and non-examples to clarify
 Allows to clarify in the native language
 Can be done cooperatively (good interaction)
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Stretch to Sketch
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Sketch to Stretch: validates the student’s interpretation of any
text. The student creates a symbol from the text and generates an
explanation of the symbol that they create.
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
 Lowers the affective filter
 Is cognitively undemanding, yet abstract
 Builds comprehension in lower-level ESL
students
 Can be done cooperatively or in Jigsaw style
 Uses pictures and words
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Storyboard
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Storyboard: Students are asked to generate storyboard as an idea
generation technique for writing. Students enjoy designing drawings that
will reflect the sequence of events in their story. Storyboard can an also be
adapted to help students sequence events as they read a text and can be a
great tool for students to use because it helps them chunk information
Why is this a good strategy for ELL’s?
 Lowers the affective filter
 Is cognitively undemanding, yet abstract
 Builds comprehension in lower-level ESL
students
 Can be done cooperatively or in Jigsaw style
 Uses pictures and words
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Free Form Map
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Free Form Map: is a great way for students to document their
abstract thoughts and understandings about a given topic. It’s also
an alternative to semantic mapping-a strategy in which the
relationships and interrelationships between concepts are made
explicit.
Why is this a good strategy for
beginner/intermediate ELL’s?
 Lowers the affective filter
 Is cognitively undemanding, yet abstract
 Can be used for assessment
 Builds comprehension in lower-level ESL
students
 Can be done cooperatively or in Jigsaw style
 Uses pictures and words
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Activity
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Assigned Strategy/activity
Choose Content Area Lesson
Use Language Acquisition Framework
Tool and PLD s rubrics
Assign a Scribe
Assign a Reporter (s)
Present to the whole group
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Implications for Instruction
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Staff Development
 Content Area Teachers
 Enrichment Area Teachers
 All Instructional Staff
Sheltered Instruction
 Second Language Acquisition
 Social/Academic Language Samples
 Time for Lesson Remodeling
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Additional Resources


Related Websites pages 5-8
References pages 9-10
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The Revised English Language Proficiency Standards …