Common Core State Standards
for English Language Arts and
Content Literacy: The Key Shifts
and Classroom Instruction
Cathy Shide
[email protected]
Goals
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Review of Standards and Organization
Key Shifts
Close Reading and Text Dependent Questions
Text Complexity – How to choose books?
Throughout the day we will be
1. Exploring implementation ideas and making plans
Resources – Close reading lessons; Reading Streets Text
Dependent Questions Grades 3-5; Anthology Unit Text
Dependent Guides 6-8; Informational Text Strategies and
Formative Assessment Suggestions
Developed by Cathy (Carter) Shide,
[email protected]
www.achievethecore.org
Something to think about!
http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=6Cf7
IL_eZ38&vq=medium A Day Made of Glass
Did You Know?
What will students need to be successful?
www.achievethecore.org
What do you know about Common Core ELA?
What have you done?
Do more thinking
Defend their answers all
subject
Not teaching the same
objectives
Worded differently
Reading and writing
standards
www.achievethecore.org
Not much
Research and evidence!!
4
ELA CCSS K-5
Reading
10 CCR
Appendix A & B
Literature Grade
level Standards
Informational
Grade level
standards
Writing
10 CCR
Appendix C
Speaking &
Listening
6 CCR
Language
6CCR
Appendix A
Foundational Skills
Grade Level standards
4 standards
Three appendices
•
•
•
A: Research and evidence; glossary of key terms
B: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasks
C: Annotated student writing samples
www.achievethecore.org
ELA CCSS 6-12
Reading
10 CCR
Appendix A & B
Literature Grade
level Standards
Writing
10 CCR
Appendix C
Speaking &
Listening
6 CCR
Language
6CCR
Appendix A
Informational
Grade level
standards
Three appendices
•
•
•
A: Research and evidence; glossary of key terms
B: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasks
C: Annotated student writing samples
www.achievethecore.org
ELA CCSS 6-12 History, Social Studies,
Science, Technical Subjects
Reading
10 CCR
Appendix A & B
Reading History,
Social Studies
www.achievethecore.org
Reading Science,
Technical Subjects
Writing
10 CCR
Appendix C
Writing History,
Social Studies,
Science, Technical
Subjects
Appendix A
Reading
Writing
• Why Text Complexity Matters
• The Standards Approach to Text
Complexity
• Key Considerations in
Implementing Text Complexity
• Standards’ Grade Specific Text
Complexity Demands
• Sample Annotated Reading Texts
Reading Foundational Skills
• Phoneme-Grapheme
Correspondences
• Phonological Awareness
• Orthography
Developed by Cathy (Carter) Shide,
www.achievethecore.org
• Definitions of Three Text
Types
• The Special Place of
Argument
Speaking & Listening
• Special Role in Literacy
• Read Alouds and ReadingSpeaking-Listening Link
Language
• Overview
• Conventions and Knowledge
of Language
• Vocabulary
Karen Wixson, PhD, University of Michigan
www.achievethecore.org
www.achievethecore.org
The Background of the Common Core
Initiated by the National Governors Association (NGA)
and Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) with
the following design principles:
• Result in College and Career Readiness
• Based on solid research and practice evidence
• Fewer, higher and clearer
www.achievethecore.org
11
Create a graphic organizer
Turn your paper horizontally (landscape) .Fold your paper into fourths.
Shifts
What and Why
Opportunities
Challenges
1. Building
knowledge through
content-rich
nonfiction
2. Reading, writing,
speaking grounded
in evidence from
text both literary
and nonfiction
3. Regular practice
with complex text
and its academic
language.
www.achievethecore.org
12
The CCSS Requires Three Shifts in ELA/Literacy
1. Building knowledge through content-rich
nonfiction
2. Reading, writing and speaking grounded in
evidence from text, both literary and
informational
3. Regular practice with complex text and its
academic language
www.achievethecore.org
13
Shift #1: Building Knowledge
Through Content-Rich Nonfiction
88
Frizzbee3519
www.achievethecore.org
14
14
Content Shift #1
Content-Rich Nonfiction
•
•
•
50/50 balance K-5
•
In grades 2+, students begin reading more complex texts,
consolidating the foundational skills with reading
comprehension.
•
Reading aloud texts that are well-above grade level should be
done throughout K-5 and beyond.
70/30 in grades 9-12
Students learning to read should exercise their ability to
comprehend complex text through read-aloud texts.
www.achievethecore.org
15
Building Knowledge Through Content-Rich
Nonfiction: Why?
•
Students are required to read very little informational text in
elementary and middle school.
•
Non-fiction makes up the vast majority of required reading in
college/workplace.
•
Informational text is harder for students to comprehend than
narrative text.
•
Supports students learning how to read different types of
informational text.
www.achievethecore.org
16
Content Shift #1
Sequencing Texts to Build Knowledge
•
•
Not random reading
Literacy in social studies/history, science, technical subjects,
and the arts is embedded
Resources
Page 33 in the CCSS for ELA/Literacy – The Human Body
www.achievethecore.org
17
Shift #2: Reading, Writing and
Speaking Grounded in Evidence
From Text, Both Literary and
Informational
www.achievethecore.org
18
18
Reading, Writing and Speaking Grounded in
Evidence from Text: Why?
•
•
Most college and workplace writing requires evidence.
•
Evidence is a major emphasis of the ELA Standards: Reading
Standard 1, Writing Standard 9, Speaking and Listening
standards 2, 3 and 4, all focus on the gathering, evaluating
and presenting of evidence from text.
•
Being able to locate and deploy evidence are hallmarks of
strong readers and writers
Ability to cite evidence differentiates strong from weak
student performance on NAEP
www.achievethecore.org
19
Content Shift #2
Text-Dependent Questions
Not Text-Dependent
Text-Dependent
In “Casey at the Bat,” Casey strikes out.
Describe a time when you failed at
something.
What makes Casey’s experiences at bat
humorous?
In “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” Dr.
King discusses nonviolent protest.
Discuss, in writing, a time when you
wanted to fight against something that
you felt was unfair.
What can you infer from King’s letter
about the letter that he received?
In “The Gettysburg Address” Lincoln says
the nation is dedicated to the
proposition that all men are created
equal. Why is equality an important
value to promote?
“The Gettysburg Address” mentions the
year 1776. According to Lincoln’s
speech, why is this year significant to
the events described in the speech?
www.achievethecore.org
20
Sample Informational Text Assessment
Question: Pre-Common Core Standards
High school students read an excerpt of James D. Watson’s The
Double Helix and respond to the following:
James Watson used time away from his laboratory and a set
of models similar to preschool toys to help him solve the
puzzle of DNA. In an essay discuss how play and relaxation
help promote clear thinking and problem solving.
www.achievethecore.org
21
Sample Literary Question: Pre-Common Core
Standards
From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Have the students identify the different methods of removing
warts that Tom and Huckleberry talk about. Discuss the charms
that they say and the items (i.e. dead cats) they use. Ask
students to devise their own charm to remove warts. Students
could develop a method that would fit in the time of Tom
Sawyer and a method that would incorporate items and words
from current time. Boys played with dead cats and frogs, during
Tom’s time. Are there cultural ideas or artifacts from the
current time that could be used in the charm?
www.achievethecore.org
22
Sample Text Dependent Question: Common
Core Standards
From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Why does Tom hesitate to allow Ben to paint the fence? How
does Twain construct his sentences to reflect that hesitation?
What effect do Tom’s hesitations have on Ben?
www.achievethecore.org
23
Shift #3:Regular Practice with
Complex Text and Its Academic
Language
www.achievethecore.org
24
Regular Practice With Complex text and Its
Academic Language: Why?
•
Gap between complexity of college and high school texts is
huge.
•
What students can read, in terms of complexity is greatest
predictor of success in college (ACT study).
•
Too many students are reading at too low a level.
(<50% of graduates can read sufficiently complex texts).
•
Standards include a staircase of increasing text complexity
from elementary through high school.
•
Standards also focus on building general academic
vocabulary so critical to comprehension.
www.achievethecore.org
25
What are the Features of Complex Text?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Subtle and/or frequent transitions
•
•
Longer paragraphs
Multiple and/or subtle themes and purposes
Density of information
Unfamiliar settings, topics or events
Lack of repetition, overlap or similarity in words and sentences
Complex sentences
Uncommon vocabulary
Lack of words, sentences or paragraphs that review or pull things
together for the student
Any text structure which is less narrative and/or mixes structures
www.achievethecore.org
26
Scaffolding Complex Text
The standards require that students read appropriately complex
text at each grade level – independently (Standard 10).
However there are many ways to scaffold student learning as
they meet the standard:
•
•
•
Multiple readings
Read Aloud
Chunking text (a little at a time)
Provide support while reading, rather than before.
www.achievethecore.org
27
Close Analytic Reading
•
Requires prompting students with questions to unpack
unique complexity of any text so students learn to read
complex text independently and proficiently.
•
•
Not teacher "think aloud“.
•
Text dependent questions require text-based answers –
evidence.
Virtually every standard is activated during the course of
every close analytic reading exemplar through the use of text
dependent questions.
www.achievethecore.org
28
Name the Standard
1.Read each of the standards for
each strand, Reading for
Literature or Informational Text;
Writing; Speaking and Listening;
Language
2.Create a name for each standard
with 1-5 word phrases
www.achievethecore.org
29
Reading Anchor Standards
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Evidence
Central ideas
Interaction
Vocabulary
Text structure
Point of view/purpose
Multimedia
Argument (evaluating argument)
Multiple texts
Range and Complexity
www.achievethecore.org
30
www.achievethecore.org
31
Writing Anchor Standards
1.
Write arguments
2.
Write to explain/inform
3.
Write narratives
4.
Write with coherence
5.
Plan, revise, rewrite
6.
Use technology
7.
Write short research
8.
Use multiple sources
9.
Use text evidence
10.
Range of tasks and purposes
www.achievethecore.org
32
Speaking and Listening Standards
1.
Range of conversations
2.
Integrate and evaluate
3.
Evaluate speaker’s point of view
4.
Present information clearly, know your audience
5.
Use digital media
6.
Adapt speech to context
www.achievethecore.org
33
Language Anchor Standards
1.
Command of grammar and usage
2.
Command of punctuation and spelling
3.
Use knowledge of language
4.
Vocabulary—use context clues
5.
Vocabulary—use figurative language
6.
Vocabulary—use academic language
www.achievethecore.org
34
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35
Structure of the Standards
•
Four Strands: Reading, Writing,
Speaking and Listening, Language
Strand
•
•
K-5 Foundational strand
Each strand has
Science/technology and social
studies standards for literacy
Anchor
Standard
•
Text complexity standards are
listed by grade “bands”: K-1, 2-3,
4-5, 6-8, 9-10, 11-12, CCR –
College and Career Ready)
GradeSpecific
Standard
www.achievethecore.org
36
Identify the Standard
RI . 4 . 2
Strand
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Grade
Standard Number
37
Identify the Standard
W. 11-12. 1b
Strand
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Grades
Standard Number
38
Performance tasks
1. Match the task to a standard
2. Brainstorm other standards this task
could also assess
3. Where are these tasks?
www.achievethecore.org
39
Fill in top line with words that begin with F
Antonyms are listed
F..
F..
Essay,
nonfiction
F..
Allow
Local,
National
Cathy Carter
Educational Consultant
www.achievethecore.org
F..
F..
Whole
Plains,
Desert
Fill in top line with words that begin with F
Antonyms are listed
F..
F..
Essay,
nonfiction
Language
Arts
F..
F..
F..
Allow
Local,
National
Whole
Plains,
Desert
Verb
Social
Studies
Math
Science
Cathy Carter
Educational Consultant
www.achievethecore.org
Fill in top line with words that begin with F
Antonyms are listed
F..
F..
F..
F..
F..
Essay,
nonfiction
Allow
Local,
National
Whole
Plains,
desert
Language
Social
Verb
Arts
Studies
Literary, Command
Other
Genre
Countries
Math
Science
Type of
Number
Biome
Cathy Carter
Educational Consultant
www.achievethecore.org
Contradictory/Reciprocal Examples Folktale
Forbid
Foreign
Fraction
Forest
Essay,
nonfiction
Allow
Local,
National
Whole
Plains,
Desert
Language
Social
Verb
Arts
Studies
Literary, Command
Other
Genre
Countries
Math
Science
Type of
Number
Biome
Cathy Carter
Educational Consultant
www.achievethecore.org
Research statements
 Kindergarten students’ vocabulary size is a predictor
of comprehension in middle school. (Scarborough,
1998)
 Students with poor vocabulary by third grade have
declining text comprehension scores in fourth and
fifth grade. (Chall, Jacobs and Baldwin, 1990)
 A single book reading improved significantly
children’s expressive vocabulary. (Senechal and
Cornell, 1993)
 Vocabulary instruction has a strong connection to
comprehension. (McKeown, Beck, Omanson and
Perfetti, 1983)
 Pre-instruction of words gave fourth grade students
greater gain. (Brett, Rothlein and Hurley, 1996)
Words heard in an hour
 Poverty: 615 words
 Middle class: 1251 words
 Professional: 2,153 words
Hart and Risley, 1995
Three-tiered Approach
 First Tier Words
• Basic words
o run, ball, is
 Second Tier
Words
• Academic words
• Found in many
curriculum areas
o vocabulary,
example,
create, add
 Third tier words
• Content words
• Low-frequency
words
• Words needed to
understand the
concept
o nutrient,
digestive,
ingesting
Beck and
McKeown,
1985
Check it out
*Page 8
Fill in the blanks with words
on the paragraph to develop
a meaning for you
*Page 8
The questions that p_____ face as they raise
chi____ from in ____ to adult life are not easy to
an___. Both fa____ and m____ can become
concerned when health problems such as co____
arise any time after the e____ stage to later life.
Experts recommend that young ch____ should
have plenty of s____ and nutritious food for
healthy growth. B____ and g____ should not
share the same b____ or even sleep in the same
r____. They may be afraid of the d____.
The questions that pourltrymen face as they raise
chickens from incubation to adult life are not easy
to answer. Both farmers and merchants can
become concerned when health problems such
as coccidiosis arise any time after the egg stage
to later life. Experts recommend that young
chicks should have plenty of sunshine and
nutritious food for healthy growth. Banties and
geese should not share the same barnyard or
even sleep in the same roost. They may be
afraid of the dark.
Coccidiosis – What can you figure out?
What is coccidiosis?
Who/What does it affect?
At what life stage does coccidiosis occur?
Why are merchants and poultrymen
concerned with coccidiosis?
Cathy Carter
Educational Consultant
Schema
Framework, the learner’s general
knowledge about a particular subject.
Provides a structure or guide for
understanding.
What do I
know
about . . .?
Without the appropriate
schema, trying to
understand a story,
textbook, or classroom
lesson is like finding your
way through a new town
without a map.
Some 3 yr olds enter
preschool knowing
three times as many
words as their less
advantaged peers.
Some 6 yr olds have
heard many
thousands of words
more than their peers
by the time they enter
1st grade
The more words you
know, the easier it is
to learn new words
because you have
more “pegs” to hang
the new words on
Better learning will not
come from finding
better ways for the
teacher to instruct, but
from giving the learner
better opportunities to
construct!
1/21/2008
Close Reading Modeling Method:
Example Tasks for K-5
Created by Content Area Specialists
for Illinois State Board of Education
Hosted by Jill Brown
ELA Content Specialists
Kathleen McNeary
Area IA
Erik Iwersen
Area I-BB, BC, BD
Amy Robinson
Area I-C
Jill Brown
Area II
Katy Sykes
Area III and IV
Kathi Rhodus
Area V and VI
www.achievethecore.org
Objectives
Discuss Text Complexity Model
Expand knowledge of reader and task
considerations
Understand key classroom practices aligned to
Common Core State Standards
Model close reading activity
Practice close reading activity
www.achievethecore.org
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Text Complexity
Text complexity is defined by:
Qualitative measures – levels of meaning,
structure, language conventionality and
clarity, and knowledge demands often best
measured by an attentive human reader.
Quantitative measures – readability and other
scores of text complexity often best measured
by computer software.
Reader and Task considerations – background
knowledge of reader, motivation, interests,
and complexity generated by tasks assigned
often best made by educators employing their
professional judgment.
Reader and Task
(Common Core State Standards Initiative)
www.achievethecore.org
62
Text Complexity
Qualitative
• Levels of meaning or
purpose
• Structure
• Language
conventionality and
clarity
• Knowledge
demands
Developed by Cathy (Carter) Shide,
[email protected]
www.achievethecore.org
Text Complexity
Quantitative
•
•
•
•
Word length
Frequency
Sentence length
Text cohesion
Developed by Cathy (Carter) Shide,
www.achievethecore.org
[email protected]
Step 3: Reader and Task
Considerations such as:
• Motivation
• Knowledge and experience
• Purpose for reading
• Complexity of task assigned
regarding text
• Complexity of questions
asked regarding text
(Common Core State Standards Initiative)
www.achievethecore.org
65
What should continue?
Libraries in room and visits to larger libraries
Guided reading options
Stations or Centers
Variety of genres
Media exposure
Word study and vocabulary instruction
Journal writing
Strategy instruction
www.achievethecore.org
What could we do better?
Revisit critical thinking.
Incorporate writing with all curricular areas
daily.
Infuse technology and instruction daily.
Integrate thematic instruction with cross
curricular genre studies.
Join cultural perspectives and relationships.
Take charge of your own learning and
professional development.
www.achievethecore.org
Baseball vs. Reading
www.achievethecore.org
www.achievethecore.org
? = I have a question about this
! = I have an idea about this
0-0 = I can visualize this
# = I have a connection
www.achievethecore.org
! = I have an idea about this,
Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
Here we go again. We were all standing in line waiting for breakfast when
one of the caseworkers came in and tap-tap-tapped down the line. Uhoh, this meant bad news, either they’d found a foster home for somebody
or somebody was about to get paddled. All the kids watched the woman
as she moved along the line, her high-heeled shoes sounding like little
firecrackers going off on the wooden floor.
Shoot! She stopped at me and said, “Are you Buddy Caldwell?”
I said, “It’s Bud, not Buddy, ma’am.”
She put her hand on my shoulder and took me out of the line. Then she
pulled Jerry, one of the littler boys, over. “Aren’t you Jerry Clark?” He
nodded.
“Boys, good news! Now that the school year has ended, you both have
been accepted in new temporary-care homes starting this afternoon!”
www.achievethecore.org
Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
Jerry asked the same thing I was thinking, “Together?”
She said, “Why no, Jerry, you’ll be in a family with three little
girls…”
Jerry looked like he’d just found out they were going to dip him
in a pot of boiling milk.
“…and Bud..” She looked at some papers she was holding. “Oh,
yes, the Amoses, you’ll be with Mr. and Mrs. Amos and their son,
who’s twelve years old, that makes him just two years older than
you, doesn’t it, Bud?”
“Yes, ma’am.”
She said, “I’m sure you’ll both be very happy.”
Me and Jerry looked at each other.
www.achievethecore.org
Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
The woman said, “Now, now , boys, no need to look so glum. I know
you don't understand what it means, but there’s a depression going on
all over this country. People can’t find jobs and these are very, very
difficult times for everybody. We’ve been lucky enough to find two
wonderful families who’ve opened their doors for you. I think it’s best
that we show our new foster families that we’re very…”
She dragged out the word very, waiting for us to finish her sentence
for her.
Jerry said, “Cheerful, helpful and grateful.” I moved my lips and
mumbled.
She smiled and said, “Unfortunately, you won’t have time for
breakfast. I’ll have a couple of pieces of fruit put in a bag. In the
meantime go to the sleep room and strip your beds and gather all of
your things.”
www.achievethecore.org
Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
Here we go again. I felt like I was walking in my sleep as I
followed Jerry back to the room where all the boys’ beds were
jim-jammed together. This was the third foster home I was going
to and I’m used to packing up and leaving, but it still surprises
me that there are always a few seconds, right after they tell you
you’ve got to go, when my nose gets all runny and my throat gets
all choky and my eyes get all sting-y. But the tears coming out
doesn’t happen to me anymore, I don’t know when it first
happened, but it seems like my eyes don’t cry anymore.
www.achievethecore.org
Key idea and detail questions
•Who is the person telling the story?
•Summarize the main event and details
supporting the event. What is explicitly
stated in the text that supports those
details?
•Describe the characters in this
selection with regards to age. What is
the setting and time period? How do
you know?
•What are the main character’s true
feelings about being placed in
temporary care? What evidence
supports that thought?
www.achievethecore.org
Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
Here we go again. We were all standing in line waiting for breakfast when
one of the caseworkers came in and tap-tap-tapped down the line. Uhoh, this meant bad news, either they’d found a foster home for somebody
or somebody was about to get paddled. All the kids watched the woman
as she moved along the line, her high-heeled shoes sounding like little
firecrackers going off on the wooden floor.
Shoot! She stopped at me and said, “Are you Buddy Caldwell?”
I said, “It’s Bud, not Buddy, ma’am.”
She put her hand on my shoulder and took me out of the line. Then she
pulled Jerry, one of the littler boys, over. “Aren’t you Jerry Clark?” He
nodded.
“Boys, good news! Now that the school year has ended, you both have
been accepted in new temporary-care homes starting this afternoon!”
www.achievethecore.org
Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
Jerry asked the same thing I was thinking, “Together?”
She said, “Why no, Jerry, you’ll be in a family with three little
girls…”
Jerry looked like he’d just found out they were going to dip him
in a pot of boiling milk.
“…and Bud..” She looked at some papers she was holding. “Oh,
yes, the Amoses, you’ll be with Mr. and Mrs. Amos and their son,
who’s twelve years old, that makes him just two years older than
you, doesn’t it, Bud?”
“Yes, ma’am.”
She said, “I’m sure you’ll both be very happy.”
Me and Jerry looked at each other.
www.achievethecore.org
Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
The woman said, “Now, now , boys, no need to look so glum. I know you don't
understand what it means, but there’s a depression going on all over this country.
People can’t find jobs and these are very, very difficult times for everybody. We’ve
been lucky enough to find two wonderful families who’ve opened their doors for you.
I think it’s best that we show our new foster families that we’re very…”
She dragged out the word very, waiting for us to finish her sentence for her.
Jerry said, “Cheerful, helpful and grateful.” I moved my lips and mumbled.
She smiled and said, “Unfortunately, you won’t have time for breakfast. I’ll have a
couple of pieces of fruit put in a bag. In the meantime go to the sleep room and strip
your beds and gather all of your things.”
In this section there are conflicting emotions – the boys are being
told to be “cheerful, helpful, and grateful” but how do they really
feel? What evidence in the text supports the true feelings of the
characters?
What are the antonyms/synonyms meanings of the words?
Does the time period have something to do with the author
choosing the word sleep room?
www.achievethecore.org
Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
Here we go again. I felt like I was walking in my sleep as I followed
Jerry back to the room where all the boys’ beds were jim-jammed
together. This was the third foster home I was going to and I’m used to
packing up and leaving, but it still surprises me that there are always a
few seconds, right after they tell you you’ve got to go, when my nose
gets all runny and my throat gets all choky and my eyes get all sting-y.
But the tears coming out doesn’t happen to me anymore, I don’t know
when it first happened, but it seems like my eyes don’t cry anymore.
What visualization comes to mind when the phrase “I felt like I was walking
in my sleep” is heard?
What does the term “jim-jammed” mean?
At any point, are there terms that can have graphics inserted from online
dictionaries inserted to better explain or give pictorial representation?
Foster home may need identification from this time period and is a good
way to incorporate technology.
www.achievethecore.org
Craft and Structure Questions
•Some possible questions might be to acknowledge the perspective
or point of view of the Bud, Jerry and the caseworker.
•How did the beginning of the selection contribute to the ending?
•How do the characters interact with one another?
•What are some of the areas of figurative language that are used
throughout the text? (shoes sounding like fire crackers, looked like
he’s be
dipped in a pot of boiling milk, how she dragged out her words)
These are underlined in yellow.
•What is the author’s meaning behind these words?
•What illustrations come to mind?
•Is first or third person narration being used?
•What could be the author’s purpose for using first or third?
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80
Third Read Integration of
ideas and
knowledge
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Third Read - Integration of ideas and
knowledge
•How did the character’s mood change from beginning of the
selection to the end of the story? Focus on the last words, “But
the tears coming out doesn’t happen to me anymore, I don’t
know when it first happened, but it seems like my eyes don’t
cry anymore.”
•What if this story took place in a different time period, how
would that change the selection? Especially if the time period
is now...
•What race do you assume Bud and Jerry are?
•If the reader hasn’t seen the cover of the book, how does the
story change if Bud is a female?
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Third Read - Integration of ideas and
knowledge
•Discuss the representation of food in the text and how the
author has the children leave with just a couple of pieces of
fruit. Discuss poverty and what pros there might be to being in
this setting and the cons. What other causes from this time
period could cause children to live in this setting?
•If possible, find an informational text about foster care from a
different cultural perspective and compare and contrast the
temporary home setting to this text.
•Students could also create a specific visual or oral
representation of the setting using descriptions and inferences
from the two texts.
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83
Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
Here we go again. We were all standing in line waiting for breakfast when
one of the caseworkers came in and tap-tap-tapped down the line. Uhoh, this meant bad news, either they’d found a foster home for somebody
or somebody was about to get paddled. All the kids watched the woman
as she moved along the line, her high-heeled shoes sounding like little
firecrackers going off on the wooden floor.
Shoot! She stopped at me and said, “Are you Buddy Caldwell?”
I said, “It’s Bud, not Buddy, ma’am.”
She put her hand on my shoulder and took me out of the line. Then she
pulled Jerry, one of the littler boys, over. “Aren’t you Jerry Clark?” He
nodded.
“Boys, good news! Now that the school year has ended, you both have
been accepted in new temporary-care homes starting this afternoon!”
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Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
Jerry asked the same thing I was thinking, “Together?”
She said, “Why no, Jerry, you’ll be in a family with three little
girls…”
Jerry looked like he’d just found out they were going to dip him
in a pot of boiling milk.
“…and Bud..” She looked at some papers she was holding. “Oh,
yes, the Amoses, you’ll be with Mr. and Mrs. Amos and their son,
who’s twelve years old, that makes him just two years older than
you, doesn’t it, Bud?”
“Yes, ma’am.”
She said, “I’m sure you’ll both be very happy.”
Me and Jerry looked at each other.
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Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
The woman said, “Now, now , boys, no need to look so glum. I
know you don't understand what it means, but there’s a
depression going on all over this country. People can’t find jobs
and these are very, very difficult times for everybody. We’ve
been lucky enough to find two wonderful families who’ve
opened their doors for you. I think it’s best that we show our
new foster families that we’re very…”
She dragged out the word very, waiting for us to finish her
sentence for her.
Jerry said, “Cheerful, helpful and grateful.” I moved my lips and
mumbled.
She smiled and said, “Unfortunately, you won’t have time for
breakfast. I’ll have a couple of pieces of fruit put in a bag. In the
meantime go to the sleep room and strip your beds and gather
all of your things.”
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Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher Paul Curtis
Here we go again. I felt like I was walking in my sleep as I
followed Jerry back to the room where all the boys’ beds were
jim-jammed together. This was the third foster home I was going
to and I’m used to packing up and leaving, but it still surprises
me that there are always a few seconds, right after they tell you
you’ve got to go, when my nose gets all runny and my throat gets
all choky and my eyes get all sting-y. But the tears coming out
doesn’t happen to me anymore, I don’t know when it first
happened, but it seems like my eyes don’t cry anymore.
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Symbol
Stands for:
∞
! = Means:
I have an idea about this,
?
Connections you
have to the text.
Question
You have seen, read, or thought
about that before.
I don’t understand. I need more
information.
!
Main Idea
+ (E)
Agree
- (E)
Disagree
New information
This is the important point the
author is trying to get across.
I agree with the author on this
point. (Support with (E)vidence)
I disagree with the author. I
think differently. (Support with
(E)vidence)
This is brand new to my thinking.
Word analysis
Structure/figurative language
NEW
Highlight
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A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
www.achievethecore.org
A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long page 88
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
(You never know what troubled little girl needs a book)..........
There was a bookstore uptown on gay street
Which I visited and inhaled that wonderful odor
Of new books
Even today I read hardcover as a preference paperback only
As a last resort
And up the hill on vine street
(The main black corridor)sat our carnegie library
Mrs. Long always glad to see you
The stereoscope always ready to show you faraway
Places to dream about
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A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
Mrs. Long asking what are you looking for today
When I wanted Leaves of Grass or alfred north whitehead
She would go to the big library uptown and i now know
Hat in hand to ask to borrow so that I might borrow
Probably they said something humiliating since southern
Whites like to humiliate southern blacks
But she nonetheless brought the books
Back and I held them to my chest
Close to my heart
And happily skipped back to grandmother’s house
Where I would sit on the front porch
In a gray glider and dream of a world
Far away
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A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
I love the world where I was
I was safe and warm and grandmother gave me neck kisses
When I was on my way to bed
But there was a world
Somewhere
Out there
And Mrs. Long opened that wardrobe
But not lions or witches scared me
I went through
Knowing there would be
Spring
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A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
www.achievethecore.org
A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
(You never know what troubled little girl needs a book)..........
There was a bookstore uptown on gay street
Which I visited and inhaled that wonderful odor
Of new books
Even today I read hardcover as a preference paperback only
As a last resort
And up the hill on vine street
(The main black corridor)sat our carnegie library
Mrs. Long always glad to see you
The stereoscope always ready to show you faraway
Places to dream about
www.achievethecore.org
A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
Mrs. Long asking what are you looking for today
When I wanted Leaves of Grass or alfred north whitehead
She would go to the big library uptown and i now know
Hat in hand to ask to borrow so that I might borrow
Probably they said something humiliating since southern
Whites like to humiliate southern blacks
But she nonetheless brought the books
Back and I held them to my chest
Close to my heart
And happily skipped back to grandmother’s house
Where I would sit on the front porch
In a gray glider and dream of a world
Far away
www.achievethecore.org
A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
I love the world where I was
I was safe and warm and grandmother gave me neck kissed
When I was on my way to bed
But there was a world
Somewhere
Out there
And Mrs. Long opened that wardrobe
But not lions or witches scared me
I went through
Knowing there would be
Spring
www.achievethecore.org
A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
www.achievethecore.org
A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
(You never know what troubled little girl needs a book)..........
There was a bookstore uptown on gay street
Which I visited and inhaled that wonderful odor
Of new books
Even today I read hardcover as a preference paperback only
As a last resort
And up the hill on vine street
(The main black corridor)sat our carnegie library
Mrs. Long always glad to see you
The stereoscope always ready to show you faraway
Places to dream about
www.achievethecore.org
A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
Mrs. Long asking what are you looking for today
When I wanted Leaves of Grass or alfred north whitehead
She would go to the big library uptown and i now know
Hat in hand to ask to borrow so that I might borrow
Probably they said something humiliating since southern
Whites like to humiliate southern blacks
But she nonetheless brought the books
Back and I held them to my chest
Close to my heart
And happily skipped back to grandmother’s house
Where I would sit on the front porch
In a gray glider and dream of a world
Far away
www.achievethecore.org
A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long
by Nikki Giovanni, Acolytes
I love the world where I was
I was safe and warm and grandmother gave me neck kissed
When I was on my way to bed
But there was a world
Somewhere
Out there
And Mrs. Long opened that wardrobe
But not lions or witches scared me
I went through
Knowing there would be
Spring
www.achievethecore.org
Process
Students and teachers understand multiple reads will occur
• Independently
• By proficient readers including teacher
Vocabulary instruction with a focus on Tier 2 words (see next
slide)
Questions will follow Common Core Standards structure
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Sample Process for Literature
•Key Ideas and Details
•State what the text says explicitly and support it with
evidence.
•Identify the central idea and theme(s).
•Analyze characters and events.
•Craft and Structure
•Interpret words and phrases.
•Analyze structures of text and how styles relate.
•Discuss purposes and points of view.
•Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
•Evaluate the different medias.
•Compare and contrast the different cultural experiences and themes.
Other texts to compare...
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Other texts to compare...
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References
http://programs.ccsso.org/projects/common%20core%20resour
ces/documents/Reader%20and%20Task%20Considerations.pdf
Curtis, C. (1999). Bud, Not Buddy. New York: Delacorte Books for
Young Readers.
Fisher, D., Frey, N., & Lapp, D. (2012). Text Complexity: Raising
Rigor in Reading. New York: International Reading Association.
Council of Chief State School Officers. , & National Governors
Association, (2010). Common core state standards initiative:
Appendix B. DOI: www.corestandards.org
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Vocabulary Shift
https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/improving-studentvocabulary?fd=1
Improving Students’ Vocabulary – Teaching Channel
https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/developing-betterquestions Developing Better Questions
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107
Changes in Lexile Ranges
Developed by Cathy (Carter) Shide,
[email protected]
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Text-Dependent Questions