Writing an Exemplar
Reading Lesson
MDCPS
Division of Language Arts/Reading
November 2012
Purpose of Common
Standards
• To improve U.S. educational attainment
by focusing schools on higher learning
goals
• To standardize educational opportunity
• To focus attention on fewer, higher, better
standards (more on outcomes than on
processes)
What Makes These Standards Special?
 Independent analysis indicates that they
are more rigorous/demanding than the
standards of 37 States
 Internationally benchmarked
 Include all grades (K-12) and emphasize
disciplinary literacy
 Increased stress on expository text,
critical reading, and use of technology
 Recognizes importance of text difficulty
and the value of canonical text
For the 2nd Time!
K-12 CRRP
Achievement Goals for K-2
70% of students in Kindergarten-2nd grade will:
 Score 85% or higher in the Broad Screen/Progress
Monitoring Tool section of the FAIR.
 Score in the 40th --- 60th percentile in the Vocabulary
Task. (AP1 & AP3)
 Respond to at least 4 out of 5 questions correctly on
the Listening Comprehension (Kindergarten) or
Reading Comprehension (Kindergarten-Grade 2)
Task.
 Read the target passage for Assessment Period 3 AP3 with 95% accuracy in
grades 1 and 2 and with fluency as follows:
 Grade 1- 60 words correct per minute
 Grade 2- 90 words correct per minute
 Score in the 40th-60th percentile in the Spelling Task (Grade 2 only)
Florida’s Common Core State
Standards Implementation Timeline
Miami-Dade’s
FL
FL
FL
FL
FL
BL (3
rd)
Let’s Explore
The Common Core!
K-2 Side by side CCSS (Lit)
K-2 Side by side CCSS (Info)
K-2 Side by side CCSS (FS)
Pacing guides
Considerations of Text Complexity
Quantitative Measures
• Readability Measures (like Lexile)
– Word frequency - < less common words = more complex
< more common words = less complex
– Syntactic complexity - < % of longer sentences = more complex
<% of shorter sentences = less complex
Qualitative Measures and Reader Task
–
–
–
–
Structure (both story structure or form of piece)
Language clarity and conventions – syntax (including vocabulary load)
Knowledge demands (life, content, cultural/literacy)
Levels of meaning/purpose
Broad Spectrum Measures
– Academic orientation – Information vs. Narrative
– Cohesion – techniques the author uses to tie text together
(repeated phrases vs. more abstract words)
– Word maturity – degrees of abstract multiple meaning words (e.g. ground, earth or soil, to
grind, or “no grounds” for an argument, or being “Well grounded”
Quantitative Evaluation
Common Scale for Band Old Lexile Range
Common Core Lexile
Range
K- 1ST
NA
NA
2nd – 3rd
450-725
450-790
4th – 5th
645-845
770-980
ONLY
QUANTITATIVE
MEASURE
INCLUDED
BOTH
QUANTITATIVE AND
QUALITATIVE
MEASURES
INCLUDED THAT
MAKES THE BROAD
SPECTRUM
Exemplar Texts
 Text samples provided to demonstrate the
level of complexity and quality the CCSS
require (Appendix B)
 Choices serve as guideposts in helping
teachers select similar complexity, quality
and range for their own classrooms
 They are not a partial or complete reading
list.
Literary Texts (Stories & Poetry)
Informational Text
Exemplar Text W/ Sample Performance Tasks
Text
Performance Tasks
Text
Performance Tasks
Kindergarten
Little Bear
by Else Minarik
and illustrated
by Maurice
Sendak
Owl at Home
by Arnold Lobel
“The Owl and
the Pussy Cat”
by Edward Lear
Pancakes for
Breakfast by
Tomie DePaola
Students (with prompting
and support ) describe
the relationship between
key events of the overall
story to the
corresponding scenes
illustrated . RL.K.7
Students (with prompting
and support) compare
and contrast the
adventures and
experiences of the owl in
the story and the owl in
the poem . RL.K.9
Students read two texts
on the topic of pancakes
and distinguish between
“Mix a Pancake” text that is a storybook
by Christina
Starfish
by
Edith Hurd
What Do You
Do With a
Tail Like
This? by Steve
Students identify the author
and illustrator and define
the role and materials each
contributes to the text.
RI.K.6
Students ask and answer
questions about animals
they encounter in the book.
RI.K.4
Jenkins
“Garden
Helpers” in
NGYE
Students (with prompting
and support) read and
demonstrate understanding
of the main idea -not all
Stories /Poetry
Informational Text
Frog and Toad
Together by
Arnold Lobel
Students retell Frog and Toad Together
while demonstrating their
understanding of a central message or
lesson (e.g., how friends are able to
solve problems together or how hard
work pays off. RL.1.2
A Tree is a
Plant by
Clyde Bulla
Students identify the reason the author
gives in the book in support of his point
about the function of roots in germination.
RI.1.8
The Wonderful
Wizard of Oz by
Frank Baum
After listening to the book, students
describe the characters of Dorothy,
Auntie EM, and Uncle Henry, the setting
of Kansan Prairie and major events such
as the arrive of the cyclone. RL.1.3
Fire! Fire! by
Gail Gibbons
After listening to the book students ask
questions about how firefighters respond to
a fire and answer using key details from the
text. RI.1.1
Little House in
the Big Woods
by Laura Ingalls
Wilder
Students (with prompting and support)
when listening to the book ask
questions about the events that occur
and by offering key details drawn from
the text. RL.1.1
Earthworms
by Claire
Llewellyn
Students locate key facts or information in
the book by using various text features
(headings, table of contents, glossary)
found in text. RI.1.5
Finn Family
Moomintroll by
Tove Jansson
Students identify the points at which
different characters are telling the story
in the book. RL.1.6
From Seed to
Pumpkin by
Wendy Pfeffer
Students use the illustrations along with
textual details to describe the key idea of
how a pumpkin grows. RI.1.7
The Paper Crane
By Molly Bang
Students identify words and phrases in
the book that appeal to the senses and
suggest the feelings of happiness
experienced by the owner of the
restaurant. RL.1.4
What Do You
Do With a
Tail Like This?
by Steve
Jenkins and
Robin Page
Students ask and answer questions
about animals they encounter in the text.
(e.g., hyena, alligator, platypus, scorpion)
Stories /Poetry
How the Camel
Got His Hump by
Rudyard Kipling
Informational Text
Students read fables and folktales from
diverse cultures that represent various
origin tales and paraphrase their central
message, lesson, or moral. RL.2.2
A Medieval
Feast by Aliki
Students read Aliki’s description of A Medieval Feast
and demonstrate their understanding of all that goes
into such an event by asking questions pertaining to
who, what, where, when, why, and how such a meal
happens and by answering using key details. RI.2.1
The Thirteen
Clocks by James
Thurber
Students describe the overall structure
story describing how the interactions of the
characters of the Duke and Princess
Saralinda introduce the beginning of the
story and how the suspenseful plot comes
to an end. RL.2.5
Bats:
Creatures of
the Night by
Joyce Milton
Students describe the reasons behind Joyce Milton’s
statement that bats are nocturnal in her Bats: Creatures
of the Night and how she supports the points she is
making in the text. RI.2.8
Bud, Not Buddy
by Christopher
Paul Curtis
Students describe how the character of Bud
responds to a major event in his life of
being placed in a foster home. RL.2.3
Throw Your
Tooth on the
Roof: Tooth
Traditions
Around the
World
By Selby Beeler
Students read Selby Beeler’s Throw Your Tooth on the
Roof: Tooth Traditions Around the World and identify
what Beeler wants to answer as well as explain the
main purpose of the text.
RI.2.6
Where Do
Polar Bears
Live by Sarah
L. Thomson
Students determine the meanings of words and phrases
encountered in Sarah L. Thomson’s Where Do Polar
Bears Live, such as cub, den, blubber, and the Arctic.
RI.2.4
A Drop of
Water: A Book
of Science and
Wonder by
Walter Wick
Students explain how the specific image of a soap
bubble and other accompanying illustrations in Walter
Wick’s A Drop of Water: A book of Science and Wonder
contribute to and clarify their understanding of bubbles
and water. RI.2.7
The Search for
Delicious by
Natalie Babbitt
Qualitative Evaluation
Category
Structure
(both story structure or form of piece)
Language Demands and
Conventions
(including vocabulary load and sentence
structure)
Knowledge Demands
(life, content, cultural/literary )
Levels of Meaning/Purpose
Notes and Comments on Text
Book opens top to bottom
Once upon a time (story)
Sequential
Causal and Problem Solution
Vocabulary load (business partners,
profit, debt, wealth,)
Sentence Structure (dialogue, sentence
variety)
Using dashes in the middle of sentences
Background Knowledge about
(harvesting, crops, business partnerships
and alluding to the fable “Tortoise and
the Hare”
Literal: Hare, who is hungry, plants on bears
land, so he and his family have food to eat.
Inferential: While Hare is doing all the
work, Bear is being tricked.
Analytical: Bears realization of Hare’s
trickery leads him to learning a lesson;
Hard work pays off.
Paradigm Shift of Instruction
The more students wrestle with
complex text the more
comprehension muscle they build
Close Analytic Read
Rules of the Road
• The text is the expert – not the teacher
– Foster student confidence and independence by having students reread
the passage, consult illustrations.
• Student support is in pairs, small groups and whole
class settings.
– Structure and time for collaboration, discussing and processing help
students internalize the skill.
• Goal is total understanding of text.
– Don’t rush through – have patience with a slower learning process that
is required by the standards and format of instruction. (close analytic
reading)
Close Analytic Read
Rules of the Road
• In primary grades, Read Alouds are expected.
• Front-loading should be done judiciously.
– The content should be embedded both in the text
and illuminated by the discussion questions, writing
activities, and extension activities.
• Selected text should enhance student literacy –
based exercises and allow them to practice
analyzing content based themes.
Close Analytic Read
Rules of the Road
Close analytic reading of exemplar text should include:
• Learning Objectives – 4-5 days on an exemplar text
• Reading Tasks – independence is the goal through multiple encounters
with the text, carefully planned and sequenced questioning with
answers that are always evidenced in text.
• Discussion/Language/Vocabulary Tasks – activities that encourage
discussion, inferring meaning from context, and attention to academic
language. High value words should be discussed and lingered over
during the instructional sequence.
Close Analytic Read
Rules of the Road
Close analytic read should include:
• Sentence Syntax Tasks – Engage students in a close examination of
complex sentences to discover how they are built and how they
convey meaning. Unpacking complex text focuses on both the precise
meaning of what the author is saying and why the author might have
constructed the sentence in a particular fashion.
• Writing Tasks – Students may paraphrase, synthesize ideas,
support opinions, or explain relationships in a culmination
activity to organize and make sense of their thinking and
learning.
Writing Exemplar Reading Lessons
for Complex Text
Step One: Read the text/s.
Step Two: Identify the Core Understandings and Key Ideas of the Text: Literal, Inferential, & Analytical
Levels of Meaning
Step Three: Determine the Primary Standard
Step Four: Write the Performance Task Question Based on the Highest Level of Meaning
Step Five: Determine the Secondary & Ongoing Standards
Step Six: Analyze the Language Standards: Vocabulary, Sentence Syntax/Structure, & Literal/Non Literal
Language
Step Seven: Create Coherent Sequences of Text-Dependent Questions for the Close-Analytic Read
(Grades: 2-5) OR for the Close-Analytic Think Aloud (Grades: K-1)
* Create Guiding Questions based on the Skills Needed to Answer the Performance Task
Question (Some of the Text-Dependent Questions from step 6 might become Guiding Questions)
Step Eight: Reflect on standards, lessons, and Guiding Questions & the relationship to the Performance
Task Question
Step Nine: Plan your day-by-day lessons scaffolding instruction towards understanding the highest level
of meaning identified in step two.
Revised November 2012
Writing Exemplar Reading Lessons
for Complex Text
Step One: Read the text/s.
Step Two: Identify the Core Understandings and Key Ideas of the Text: Literal, Inferential, & Analytical
Levels of Meaning
Step Three: Determine the Primary Standard
Step Four: Write the Performance Task Question Based on the Highest Level of Meaning
Step Five: Determine the Secondary & Ongoing Standards
Step Six: Analyze the Language Standards: Vocabulary, Sentence Syntax/Structure, & Literal/Non Literal
Language
Step Seven: Create Coherent Sequences of Text-Dependent Questions for the Close-Analytic Read
(Grades: 2-5) OR for the Close-Analytic Think Aloud (Grades: K-1)
* Create Guiding Questions based on the Skills Needed to Answer the Performance Task
Question (Some of the Text-Dependent Questions from step 6 might become Guiding Questions)
Step Eight: Reflect on standards, lessons, and Guiding Questions & the relationship to the Performance
Task Question
Step Nine: Plan your day-by-day lessons scaffolding instruction towards understanding the highest level
of meaning identified in step two.
Revised November 2012
Planning for a Rigorous Lesson Gr. 2
Step 2
Key Ideas
Literal
Identify Core
Understanding • Hare, who is hungry, plants on
bears land, so he and his family
and
have food to eat.
Key Ideas of
the Text
Inferential
• While Hare is doing all the work,
(Identify the key
Bear is being tricked.
insights students
should understand
from the text.)
Analytical
•
Bears realization of Hare’s trickery
Leads him to learning a lesson;
Hard work pays off.
Instructional Tools:
•Mentor Text
Standards
Identify the
Primary
Standard
RL.2.2 – Recount stories,
including fables and
folktales from diverse
cultures, and determine
their central message, or
moral.
Instructional Tools:
•Common Core State
Standards K-2
•Common Core State
Standards At-a-Glance
•Task Cards
Step 3
Performance Task Question
Step 4
Develop a
Performance
Task
Question
How do the
events in the
story change
Bear’s work
habits?
Instructional Tools:
• QAR’s
•Task Cards
Standards
Secondary Standards:
RL.2.3 – Describe how characters in a story respond to major events
and challenges.
RL.2.10 – By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature,
including stories and poetry, in the grades 2-3 text complexity band
proficiently , with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Identify the
Ongoing
Standards
Ongoing Standards:
RL.2.1- Ask and answer such questions as who, what , where, when, why
and how, to demonstrated understanding of key details in a text.
RL.2.4 - Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats,
alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a
story, poem, or song.
RL. 2.5 – Describe the overall structure of the story, including describing
how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the
action.
RL.2.6 – Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters,
including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading
dialogue aloud.
RL. 2.7 – Use information gained from the illustration and words in a
print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of it’s characters,
setting , or plot.
Step 5
Identify the
Secondary
Standards
Instructional
Tools:
•Common Core
State Standards
K-2
•Common Core
State Standards
At-a-Glance
•Task Cards
Language: Vocabulary
Step 6
Identify Language
Standards
Vocabulary
Tools:
Context Clues Chart
Common Prefixes List
Common Suffixes List
Vocabulary
Clarification Chart
Context Clues: wealth, lazy
Synonyms:
Antonyms: hard work; lazy
Prefixes:
Base Words:
Multiple Meaning:
Academic Words:
wealth
debt
profit
business partners
cheated
clever
lazy
crops
harvest
Language: Literal & Nonliteral
Identify Language
Standards
Literal & Nonliteral
Tools:
Figurative Language
Chart
Hare and his family were in very bad shape.
So Hare and Mrs. Hare put their heads together and cooked up a
plan.
We can split the profit right down the middle.
Language: Sentence Syntax
Identify Language
Standards
Tools:
Sentence Syntax
Clarification Chart
Sentence Syntax
“The top half or the bottom half? It’s up to you -tops or bottoms.”
“It’s a done deal, Bear.”
When it was time for the harvest..
And although Hare and Bear learned to live happily as neighbors, they never
became business partners again.
Text Dependent Questions
Create Text
Dependent
Sequential
Questions
Step 7
• What was Hare’s serious problem?
• Did he go about getting food in the
way that you would expect him to?
• What makes a person clever?
• How was Hare clever in the way
he solved his problem?
• When Hare tricks Bear for the first
time, how does Bear feel? How do
you know?
• Look at the illustrations on pages
1-25, and describe how Bear feels
about work. How do you know?
• What do the illustration on pages
26-29 show the reader about
Bear?
Instructional Tools:
•Task Cards
•QAR’s
•Mentor Text
Let’s Reflect… Step 8
Think about…
the Performance Task Question…
1. Do your lessons lead up to FULL
understanding of the text?
2. Will your students be able to answer
the Performance Task Question
INDEPENDENTLY?
Foundational Skills
Things To Consider
• Foundational Skills in Common Core is where you would
locate your phonics and word recognition standards
• Houghton Mifflin phonics is aligned to the Common Core
Foundational Skills
• Houghton Mifflin phonics follows a research based scope
and sequence
• The instruction of phonic skills daily is a non-negotiable
• Phonics instruction should be delivered utilizing a explicitly
and systematic approach (teacher modeling, guided
practice, independent application of skills in connected text)
Foundational Skills
RF.2.3bKnow spelling-sound
correspondences for common
vowel teams
RF.2.3c –
Decode regularly spelled twosyllable words with long vowels
sleep
hungry
asleep
neighbor
weeded
open
beets
weeded
agreed
season
cheated
Prosody:
“The compilation of spoken language features that
includes stress or emphasis, pitch variations,
intonation, reading rate, and pausing.”
Osborn & Lehr, 2003
Visualizing Planning and Instruction
Planning
Teaching
Performance Task
Question
Performance Task
Question
Step 9
FIVE DAY PLAN FOR
“TOPS AND BOTTOMS”
Five Day Planner
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Focus Standard:
Main Idea
Focus Standard:
Vocabulary/Sent. Syn.
Focus Standard:
Story Structure
• Characteristics of a
Trickster Tale
• Cover to Cover
Purpose setting:
Student read the text
independently for initial
understanding .
• Students will orally
recount and describe
key ideas or details
from the text. Teacher
will ask building
confidence questions
•Students in small
groups participate in
collaborative
conversations
to complete the
Elements of a Trickster
Tale Chart.
•
Teach context
clues utilizing the
“Context Clues
Chart”
Purpose setting:
Reread to clarify
words and/or phrases
in text.
• Teach literary text
structure
• Character traits
lesson
Purpose Setting:
Reread to sequentially
organize major event
in the story.
Purpose Setting:
• Students will
complete the
pattern puzzle
in small groups
• Teacher will guide
and facilitate the
academic
vocabulary and
sentence syntax
discussions
• Students recount
the story using their
pattern puzzle
• Students complete
the story map
• Students will
complete the
Vocabulary and
Sentence Syntax
Clarification Charts
• Ask and answer
story structure
questions,
• Quick Write in
response log
• Instruction of the
ee vowel team
• HFW
• Making Words
Lesson
• HFW
•
Day 4
Syllable Patterns
Lesson Skills
Foundational
•
HFW
Day 5
Focus Standard:
Focus Standard:
Cmplx.Text/M.I./Intrctn
Interaction/Point of View
Students will
reread the text in
small groups to find
evidence of
character traits for
the assigned
character and text
mark.
• Students will
complete the
Author’s Toolbox for
Bringing a Character
to Life Chart in small
groups
• Ask and answer
Coherent
Sequence of Text
Dependent
Questions
Purpose Setting:
Pose the Performance
Task Question
• Reread and answer
the Performance
Task Question
• Follow the
Performance Task
Instructional
Procedure
• Ask and answer
questions related to
character
development
•
Spot and Dot
Foundational
Skills
for Syllabication
•
HFW
•
Assess Phonic
Foundational
Skill of theSkills
Week
Culminating Activity
Performance Task Question
How do the events in
the story change Bear’s
work habits?
Performance Task
Instructional Procedure
Teacher Modeling/Think Aloud
• Teacher/student analyze question by discussing what is necessary to fulfill the
requirement of the task
• Teacher/students examine text to support the responses
Write Answers To The Questions
• Students write individual answers
• Students share written responses in pairs/groups
Improving Responses
Compare and Justify
• Guide students in discussing whether the answer fulfills the reading concepts
embodied in the task and are supported by the selection
Develop Better Responses
• Use student responses to build and model complete paraphrased text-based answers
Application For Ongoing Instruction
• Students practice responding to similar questions and apply strategies independently
with various texts
• Teachers select assessments for primary and secondary standards
Primary Teachers…
It’s YOUR TURN!!!
Time for you to plan
complex text…
Writing Exemplar Reading Lessons
for Complex Text
Step One: Read the text/s.
Step Two: Identify the Core Understandings and Key Ideas of the Text: Literal, Inferential, & Analytical
Levels of Meaning
Step Three: Determine the Primary Standard
Step Four: Write the Performance Task Question Based on the Highest Level of Meaning
Step Five: Determine the Secondary & Ongoing Standards
Step Six: Analyze the Language Standards: Vocabulary, Sentence Syntax/Structure, & Literal/Non Literal
Language
Step Seven: Create Coherent Sequences of Text-Dependent Questions for the Close-Analytic Read
(Grades: 2-5) OR for the Close-Analytic Think Aloud (Grades: K-1)
* Create Guiding Questions based on the Skills Needed to Answer the Performance Task
Question (Some of the Text-Dependent Questions from step 6 might become Guiding Questions)
Step Eight: Reflect on standards, lessons, and Guiding Questions & the relationship to the Performance
Task Question
Step Nine: Plan your day-by-day lessons scaffolding instruction towards understanding the highest level
of meaning identified in step two.
Revised November 2012
Kindergarten
Joy Cowley
First Grade
Phillip and Hannah Hoose
Second Grade
Brian Lies
Gail Gibbons
Planning for a Rigorous Lesson Gr. 2
Step 2
Key Ideas…
Literal – These are the basic facts,
details, or information presented wordfor-word stating the exact meaning.
Inferential – This is the information that
the students will infer (figure out) beyond
(Identify the key
the literal meaning based on the
insights students
details/evidence stated in the text.
should understand
Analytical – This is a close, thorough
from the text.)
examination of the relationship of the
whole to the parts OR the parts to the
whole. The process of demonstrating
understanding of analytical information
is complex yet systematic, logical, and
detailed which provides evidence based
on text.
Identify
Core
Understanding
and Key Ideas
of the Text
Standards…
Identify the
Primary
Standard
Step 3
Primary –
This targets your analytical level of
understanding.
Performance Task Question…
Performance
Task
This is a question the students will need to answer IN
WRITING at the END of instruction.
(Culminating
Assessment)
The lessons taught daily will scaffold the student’s
understanding of the literal and inferred information
guiding them towards the ultimate analytical level of
understanding.
Part of the answer will include literal and inferential
information from the text as support for analytical
meaning.
Step 4
Standards…
Identify the
Secondary &
Ongoing
Standards
Secondary – This/these targets your lessons
and scaffolded instruction to help your
students get to the understanding in the
primary standard.
Ongoing – These are standards you have
previously instructed that you may review or
touch on in some way during your lessons.
Step 5
Language: Vocabulary
Identify
Language
Standards
Are there words that have???
•Context Clues –
•Synonyms –
•Antonyms –
•Prefixes –
•Suffixes –
•Base Words –
•Multiple Meaning Words –
•Compound Words –
•Academic Vocabulary – Other Tier 2 words NOT
previously addressed above.
Literal & Non Literal Language – These are words,
Step 6
phrases, and/or sentences that have descriptive and/or
figurative language worth lingering over.
Language: Sentence Syntax
Identify
Language
Standards
Sentence Syntax & Structures:
These are phrases or sentences in which the arrangement
and operation of the words together may be unusual for
the students to encounter. This not only includes the
wording but the conventions such as grammar and
punctuation. The placement of words and conventions in
the sentence will determine the true meaning and ideas
expressed by the author.
Sequential Text-Dependent
Questions
Create Text
Dependent
Sequential
Questions:
The literal & inferred questions to guide
students towards total understanding of the
analytical information of the text helping them
to answer the performance task question.)
Step 7
Let’s Reflect… Step 8
Think about…
the Performance Task Question…
1. Do your lessons lead up to FULL
understanding of the text?
2. Will your students be able to answer
the Performance Task Question
INDEPENDENTLY?
Kindergarten and First Grade Teachers
Foundational Skills…
Phonics:
Syllable
Type
High-Frequency
Words:
Example
Frequency
fantastic
43.3
Open
silent
28.9
VCe
basement
6.7
Vowel team
moisture
9.5
r-controlled
circumstan
ce
10.2
Final Stable
station
1.4
Closed
Language
Conventions Keep these standards in mind:
When writing or speaking use:
•collective nouns (e.g., group)
•Irregular plural nouns (e.g., feet, children, teeth, mice, fish)
•reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves)
•past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid, told)
•adjectives and adverbs
•simple and compound sentences (e.g., The boy watched the movie;
The little boy watched the movie; The action movie was watched by
the little boy.)
When writing:
•capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names
•commas in greetings and closings of letters
•apostrophe to form contractions & frequently occurring possessives
•generalize learned spelling patterns (e.g., cage → badge; boy → boil)
•consult reference materials
What lessons are you going to teach to address your plan???
BREAK IT APART for 10 days…
Day ___
Focus Standard:
_________________
Day ___
Focus Standard:
_________________
Day ___
Focus Standard:
_________________
Day ___
Focus Standard:
_________________
Day ___
Focus Standard:
_________________
Purpose for Reading:
Purpose for Reading:
Purpose for Reading:
Purpose for Reading:
Purpose for Reading:
Activity:
Activity:
Activity:
Activity:
Activity:
Guiding Question:
Guiding Question:
Guiding Question:
Guiding Question:
Guiding Question:
Foundational Skills:
Foundational Skills:
Foundational Skills:
Foundational Skills:
Foundational Skills:
Remember… THIS unit has
TWO texts. Let’s plan AGAIN…
Bats
By Gail Gibbons
Writing Exemplar Reading Lessons
for Complex Text
Step One: Read the text/s.
Step Two: Identify the Core Understandings and Key Ideas of the Text: Literal, Inferential, & Analytical
Levels of Meaning
Step Three: Determine the Primary Standard
Step Four: Write the Performance Task Question Based on the Highest Level of Meaning
Step Five: Determine the Secondary & Ongoing Standards
Step Six: Analyze the Language Standards: Vocabulary, Sentence Syntax/Structure, & Literal/Non Literal
Language
Step Seven: Create Coherent Sequences of Text-Dependent Questions for the Close-Analytic Read
(Grades: 2-5) OR for the Close-Analytic Think Aloud (Grades: K-1)
* Create Guiding Questions based on the Skills Needed to Answer the Performance Task
Question (Some of the Text-Dependent Questions from step 6 might become Guiding Questions)
Step Eight: Reflect on standards, lessons, and Guiding Questions & the relationship to the Performance
Task Question
Step Nine: Plan your day-by-day lessons scaffolding instruction towards understanding the highest level
of meaning identified in step two.
Revised November 2012
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