Can We Agree?
Appreciation for one another
Exchange ideas freely
Influence what we can
Opportunity to reflect
Unite in purpose
Housekeeping
• Restrooms
• Schedule
• Technology
Technology
• Cell phones on vibrate.
• Wifi log-in instructions
#NCEL14
@NCDPI_ELs
Speed Dating
• Have you ever heard of speed dating? Let’s try
it!
– We will rotate chairs and converse with a partner
for 30 seconds and then move on
– Introduce yourself and what LEA you are from
Inclusion Activity: Group Resume
Each Group:
• Pick a facilitator and a scribe to keep track of the discussion
on chart paper
• Prepare a 2-3 minute presentation that highlights the
strengths/ interests of the entire group.
– “How would you promote your group to others?”
• How many years of teaching experience do you have?
• What are your certifications?
• Special skills
WOW us with your AMAZING group resume 
Our Vision
• “To build capacity at the local school system
level and sustain statewide implementation of
research-based strategies to meet the needs
of our English learners.”
• Thank you for being part of this journey and
helping make the vision a reality!
Today’s Agenda
8:00 – 8:30 am
Sign in
8:30 – 10:30
English Language Development
10:30- 10:45
BREAK
10:45- 12: 00
Academic Language
12:00 – 12:30
Lunch
12:30 – 1:45
Juicy Sentence and Talk Moves
1:45 – 2:00
BREAK
2:00- 3:00
Model Performance Indicators
Links of Interest
NC DPI Title III/ESL Website
– http://eldnces.ncdpi.wikispace
s.net/Home+%28ELD%29
Rank your WIDA knowledge level
Survey “Questions”
1. I can explain the 6 language proficiency levels.
2. I know about the WIDA performance definitions...
3. I can explain the differences among vocabulary usage, language forms &
conventions, and linguistic complexity.
4. I can utilize WIDA standards to develop lesson plans.
5. I am able to develop MPIs for content standards based on students’
language proficiency levels
6. I can recognize whether WIDA standards are being utilized within
instruction.
ELD Curriculum Resources
• ELD Standards
• Can Do Statements
• Model Performance Indicators
• Features of Academic Language
– Discourse Complexity
– Language Forms and Conventions
– Vocabulary Usage
THE WIDA ELD STANDARDS
FRAMEWORK
WIDA’s Guiding Principles of Language
Development
Cards with one guiding principle each are
on each table.
Participant 1 reads the card.
Participant 2 responds to the card.
Participant 3 adds an additional
response.
Participant 4 summarizes what has been
said.
(Add additional responses before the
summary as needed based on the
number at your table.)
NC ELD SCS (WIDA ELD Standards)
WIDA’s Features of Academic
Language
• Word level
• Sentence level
• Discourse level
CAN DO Descriptors
Organization of MPI’s in Standards
MPI
STRAND
Elements of a
Model Performance Indicator
Proficiency Levels
Grade: 7
Standards Connection
New Elements in 2012
ELDStandard 5: The Language of Social Studies
Connection
Example Topic
Agriculture
READING
Students at all levels
of English language
proficiency are
exposed to gradelevel words and
expressions, such as:
agricultural product,
natural resource
Level 1
Entering
Identify
agricultural icons
using visual or
graphic support
(e.g., on maps or
graphs)
Level 2
Emerging
Locate resources
or agricultural
products using
visual or graphic
support
Level 3
Developing
Distinguish among
resources or
agricultural
products using
visual or graphic
support
Level 4
Expanding
Find patterns
associated with
resources or
agricultural
products using
visual or graphic
support
Level 5
Bridging
Draw conclusions
about resources or
agricultural
products on maps
or graphs from
grade-level text
Cognitive Function: Students at all levels of English language proficiency ANALYZE the importance of
agricultural resources to regional economies.
Example Context for Language Use: Students read informational texts and related websites
about crops or agricultural products to use maps or create charts.
Topical
WIDAVocabulary
Consortium
Cognitive Function
Example Context for Language Use
Level 6 - Reaching
Topical
Vocabulary:
Content Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas #7: Integrate visual
information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital text.
Performance Definitions
At a given proficiency
level, what the ELL
student will process,
understand, produce,
or use.
(Page RG44 in the 2007
Edition)
New Performance Definitions
Receptive
Productive
Process for Developing MPIs
ALSO: Assessment & Feedback
Everyday vs. Academic Language
• We can explore forests and wilderness by hiking
and camping.
• Hiking and camping lets us explore vast forests
and wilderness areas. EOG Grade 6 Reading released item
Everyday vs. Academic Language
Everyday
Language
Academic
Language
•Immediate feedback from •Anticipation of level of
listener
•Gestures
•Prosody (pitch, stress,
phrasing)
•Facial expressions
•Ability to add information
in real time
explicitness required of
reader
•Precise word choice
•Time to structure text
Activity: Types of Language
1) Turn to a partner.
2) Decide who will be A and who will be B.
3) A discuss your favorite fruit and why you like it.
4) B write key words used in your discussion.
5) Switch
Standard 1:
Social and Instructional Language
Activity: The Language of an Apple
Standard 2: The language of Language Arts
• A describes the apple from a poet’s perspective.
• B writes key words and phrases.
Standards 5 & 3: The language of Social Studies
& Mathematics
• B discusses the apple from an economist’s
perspective.
• A writes key words and phrases.
Activity: The Language of an Apple
Standard 4: The language of Science
• A describes the apple from a biologist’s
perspective.
• B writes key words and phrases.
Standard 5: The language of Social Studies
• B discusses the apple from a historian’s
perspective.
• A writes key words and phrases.
Activity: The Language of an Apple
Cultural and Social factors
• A and B write any emotional associations
you have with “apple”.
Activity: The Language of an Apple
• Now, two pairs create a group of four.
• Discuss your observations:
How does the language used to discuss the apple
change depending on the focus?
• Share out.
Academic language varies by…
• Purpose
• Type
Lily Wong Fillmore
Professor Emerita, University of California, Berkeley
Ensuring that language minority and
struggling students meet the language
demands called for in College and Career
Readiness Standards
⇒⇒⇒
Instructional shifts that provide all
students access to complex text.
As adapted from Dr. Lilly Wong Fillmore & Charles Fillmore, Rebecca Blum Martinez,
University of New Mexico, and the Council of Great City Schools
Standards and ELLs/Struggling
Readers
• CCSS adopted by many states
• Addresses the “dumbing down” of curricula
• Prepares students to be “college and career
ready”
• After many years of scripted curricula, how to
change teaching?
• What about ELL students? What about
struggling readers? Can they participate?
How?
What have been the teaching
practices for ELLs?
• Simplification of the L2 learning process
– Comprehension is all that matters
– Students should feel no anxiety in learning
– Scaffolding means “front-loading” all information
– Use of simplified texts which were created for
struggling readers, not ELLs.
– Students have had no exposure to other, more
formal registers of language (oral and written)
The result for ELLs
• To many years in segregated ESL classes
register (Valdes, 2001)
• ESL classes focused on the newly arrived
• No real curriculum for ELLS (scope &
sequence)
• Little progress is made in the register needed
for school
• Long term ELLs!!
Based on the work of Lily Wong Fillmore and
Charles Fillmore
Let’s look at an example of a
simplified text
Abraham Lincoln’s childhood
Abe had to work and did not get to go to school
very often. But he loved to read books and
would read whenever he got the chance.
Math was also a favorite subject for Abe.
From: Score.rims.k12.ca.us/activity/presidentsday/pages/linc6.htm
Now let’s compare to one that is a bit
more complex
Abraham Lincoln’s childhood
Lincoln had less than a year of schooling. Books
were scarce and so was paper. He worked his
arithmetic problems on a board and cleaned the
board with a knife so he could use it again.
The family owned a Bible and he spent many hours
reading it. He would copy parts of it in order to
memorize it. Sometimes he would walk for miles
to borrow a book. One of his favorite books was
“The Life of George Washington.”
• Which version captured your attention?
• What makes one better than the other?
• Which version are EL’s or struggling readers
more likely to see in school?
Based on the work of the Language and Cultural Equity Office, and
Rebecca Blum Martinez
Let’s compare the two versions
•
•
•
•
•
Language (words, structure)
Flow, cohesiveness, coherence
Ease of following ideas
In formativeness
Overall impression of Lincoln
What is needed for L2 learning?
• Speakers willing to engage with learners
• Learners needing or wanting the L2
• A context which allows for engagement between
the two.
• Sufficient language data for the learner to create
hypotheses about how the language works
• Sufficient opportunities to use the language
• Sufficient feedback to ‘correct’ hypotheses
• Ever increasing complexity and breadth of data
And how are academic registers
learned?
• Through engagement with academic texts that
are sufficiently complex
• From different subject areas
• And that increase in complexity
• With the assistance of a teacher who can
point out the structures, components, ways of
expressing meaning in those texts.
Based on the work of Lily Wong Fillmore, Charles Fillmore, Snow, Schleppegrell, Gee
Let’s return to the second text
Lincoln had less than a year of schooling. Books
were scarce and so was paper. He worked his
arithmetic problems on a board and cleaned
the board with a knife so (that) he could use it
again.
www.garden of praise.com/ibdiinco.htm
Find beautiful and compelling texts
Pick a “Juicy Sentence”
• That represents a big idea
• Unpack or deconstruct that sentence to
discover how the grammatical, rhetorical
components make meaning.
• Do this in preparation for teaching
How to Choose “Juicy” Complex
Excerpts and Sentences
Choose Sentences that are:
•
tied closely to the Essential Question being explored.
•
layered with academic Tier 2 vocabulary.
•
long and embedded with main and dangling clauses, parts,
and phrases.
•
filled with figurative language that merits attention.
Lily Wong Fillmore and Maryann Cucchiara 2012
Simple steps in working through a complex sentence
1. Choose a complex sentence ahead of time;
2. Decide on chunks; note complex parts.
3. In class: Read sentence aloud (together).
4. Identify the meaning of the subject.
5. Identify the meaning of the predicate.
Keep building common ground…
6. Discuss the meaning of each chunk;
Keep building common ground…
7. Keep going until the entire sentence is generally
understood.
8. Ask for reformulations, paraphrases, what was learned.
9. Link paraphrases to original sentence.
10. Read the sentence aloud again, together.
Your turn….
Abraham Lincoln’s education consisted of little
more than a total of 18 months throughout
his early life, and was mostly from itinerant
teachers. This did not stop young Abraham
Lincoln thirsting for knowledge through. He
was an avid reader and borrowed books from
neighbors at every opportunity. Some,
perhaps including his father thought Abraham
may have been doing al this reading to avoid
manual labor, even though he was known to
be very skilled with an axe.
Let’s examine this sentence
Abraham Lincoln’s
education consisted of
little more than a total
of 18 months
throughout his early
life, and was mostly
from itinerant teachers.
– Detached Stance
– Lexical density through
the use of embedded
clauses and phrases
– Adverbials that add
more information
What is one way to work with
complex text for Ells?
• Academic Discourse, Academic Conversation,
Academic Discussion……
~Talk Moves!
Briefly, why aim for talk and discussion?
•Talk reveals understanding and
misunderstanding.
• Talk supports academic language development.
• Talk supports deeper reasoning.
• Talk supports social development and
perspective taking.
Talk moves is about talk by teachers and
students about academically important
content:
• Talk that supports development of student
reasoning
• Talk that supports improvement in students' ability
to communicate their reasoning
So why do you think Abraham Lincoln
would walk for miles to borrow a book?
What if the response is this:
24 blank faces. 1 or 2 hands up.
You think:
They need time to think!
(and maybe time to
practice what they want to
say!)
9 Talk Moves—
Choices, Choices, Choices
1. Turn and Talk
2. Say More
3. So Are You Saying?
4. Who can rephrase…?
5. Why do you think that?
6. Can you think of an opposite answer?
7. What do others think?
8. Who can add more to what ____ just said?
9. Who can explain why ____ said that answer?
Guiding
Questions &
Conversation
Prompts
Sentence Starters
for Conversation
Prompts
Writing
Assignments
Let’s Practice
• Choose a juicy sentence from the sample
reading with those at your table!
– Find a text you would use in your classroom!
Plan a short academically productive
conversation
• That focuses on the structures of the sentence
and their meanings.
• This is NOT meant to be a GRAMMAR Lesson!
• Use the “talk moves” as the strategy for this
conversation
Resources
www.textproject.org
http://inquiryproject.terc.edu
www.cgcs.org
BREAK
Please Return
in:
15
minutes
Examples of transformed MPIs
http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=1089921&backurl=/sh
elf/my
Links to the Standards:
Math
Science
ELA
Social Studies
Work with a partner to develop a strand of MPIs.
Links to NC
Standards:
Math
Science
ELA
Social Studies
Practice & Application
At your table discuss possible MPIs that could be created based on the following
information & select 1 person from your table to share with the whole group.
•
•
•
•
ELD Standard: Language of Science
Content Standard: Explain why Earth sustains life while other planets
do not based on their properties (including types of surface, atmosphere
and gravitational force) and location to the Sun
Cognitive Function: your choice
Language Proficiency Level: Level 3
Looking for Strands of MPIs?
www.wida.us/downloadlibrary/standards
Identify
Problems
(Define & Clarify)
Evaluate &
Revise
Action Plan
Develop
Hypothesis
Collect
& Use
Data
Discuss &
Select
Solutions
Problem Solving
Meeting Foundations
Develop &
Implement
Action Plan
Identify
Problems
(Define & Clarify)
Evaluate &
Revise
Action Plan
Develop
Hypothesis
Collect
& Use
Data
Develop &
Implement
Action Plan
Discuss &
Select
Solutions
Problem Solving
Meeting Foundations
Identify
Problems
(Define & Clarify)
ACCESS for ELLs Teacher Report
Evaluate &
Revise
Action Plan
Develop
Hypothesis
Collect
& Use
Data
Develop &
Implement
Action Plan
Discuss &
Select
Solutions
Problem Solving
Meeting Foundations
Identify
Problems
(Define & Clarify)
Evaluate &
Revise
Action Plan
Develop
Hypothesis
Collect
& Use
Data
Develop &
Implement
Action Plan
Discuss &
Select
Solutions
Problem Solving
Meeting Foundations
Identify
Problems
(Define & Clarify)
Evaluate &
Revise
Action Plan
Develop
Hypothesis
Collect
& Use
Data
Develop &
Implement
Action Plan
Discuss &
Select
Solutions
Problem Solving
Meeting Foundations
On-Line Training Modules
•
LinguaFolio training modules
– Http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/linguafolio/
•
The WIDA English Language Development Standards
– http://www.rt3nc.org/
– Available to NC Teachers through HomeBase. Accessed by
logging in with your existing username and password.
Final Thoughts
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Can We Agree? - NC English Language Development …