Introduction to Media Studies
SoSe 2011
Mag. Klaus Heissenberger
North American Literary and Cultural Studies
Universität des Saarlandes
Introduction to Media Studies
SoSe 2011
Mag. Klaus Heissenberger
North American Literary and Cultural Studies
Universität des Saarlandes
second meanings, hidden meaning
analyze
influence on society
insight (other) culture > cross-cultural knowledge
use for future professions, the workplace > getting a job in the media
... National interest
omnipresence > link to culture, everyday life
like media etc.
personal transformation > into analysts
ability to cross-reference
communicate to youngster/pupils
contemporary relevance, e.g. actual use of language / authenticity
----Society --- progress -- politics -- democracy -- ...
The “Circuit of Culture”
The “Circuit of Culture”
Paul Du Gay, Stuart Hall, Linda Janes,
Hugh Mackay, und Keith Negus. Doing
Cultural Studies. The Story of the Sony
Walkman. London: Sage/The Open
University, 1997.
The “Circuit of Culture”
The “Circuit of Culture”
The “Circuit of Culture”
The “Circuit of Culture”
The “Circuit of Culture”
The “Circuit of Culture”
The “Circuit of Culture”
5 interlinked “moments” at which culture is
meaningful:
… production
… consumption
… representation
… identity
… regulation
Cultural Studies: Culture, representation,
identity and power
culture
power
representation
identity
Cultural Studies: Culture, representation,
identity and power
• conventions and conventionality
• norms, the ‘normal’ (default, standard, generic)
• difference: the ‘other’
• power: binary differences are hierarchical
• social identity: construction of the subject through differences
• ‘representation’
• (making) meaning
The circuit of culture
Paul Du Gay, Stuart Hall, Linda Janes, Hugh Mackay, und Keith Negus. Doing
Cultural Studies. The Story of the Sony Walkman. London: Sahe/The Open
University, 1997.
The “Circuit of Culture”
Making identity more complicated
Concepts of identity: Identity activity -- theory:
identity = social dimension
categories = subject positions
contingent = variable, shifting because dependent on the context
Subject ≈ public, social aspect of the self
Reading: Stuart Hall, 3 conceptions of identity
- Enlightenment subject
- Sociological subject
- Postmodern subject
Essentialist vs. non-essentialist concepts or
ideas of (racial/ethnic, sex/gender etc.)
identity:
Essentialist ideas:
Identity is supposed to be fixed in an
originating moment. There is a “true,”
authentic, fixed set of characteristics that
belong to a particular group. These
characteristics do not change across time
and are shared by all members of this
group.
Essentialist vs. non-essentialist concepts or
ideas of (racial/ethnic, sex/gender etc.)
identity:
Non-essentialist ideas:
A non-essentialist perspective questions whether it
is possible to speak of a “true” identity that is fixed
for all time and in all places.
Identity is seen as contingent, i.e. dependent on the
context, and produced by (or: the result of) a
particular negotiation of differences (of sex, gender,
race, ethnicity, class, age,...) in the respective
context. There is not any authentic, fixed set of
characteristics that belongs to a particular group.
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SERIES II: Gender