Gifted and Talented
Black Minority Ethnic and EAL pupils project
Tuesday 31st March 2009
Outline of the day
9:30 – 10:00 Outline of the project
10:00 – 10:45 G&T / EAL pupils – looking at the pupils in your school.
10:45 – 11:00 Tea / coffee
11:00 – 12:30 The Gifted and Talented pupil
12:30 – 1:20
Lunch
1:20 – 2:00 Identification and tackling underachievement
2:00 – 3:00 Learning and Teaching Strategies
3:00 – 3:30 Developing the project
The G&T BME & EAL Project
Aims to:
• explore and understand the needs of BME/EAL pupils with
(potential) high ability
• evaluate the effectiveness of L&T strategies / materials in
supporting learning pathways
• consider the role of mentoring
• produce a short case study of strategies that effectively meet these
pupils learning needs.
So why?
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Equitability and inclusion
National data – BME / EAL underrepresented
Local under representation on G&T registers
Rural context – isolated
Little evidence of successful strategies outside major cities
Lack of shared knowledge of what works!
Opportunity for us to learn
How the project works……..
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Initial teacher day
Build case study of identified pupil’s/pupils’ needs
Use and evaluate impact of learning & teaching tools
Complete case study of pupil/s
Disseminate impact in school
Consider potential of other BME/EAL pupils as G&T
Identify their needs - ongoing
The case study………
• To provide evidence of good practice strategies
• To create a tool to share what works
• To improve school practice and provision for potentially
high ability BME/EAL learners
• To develop own expertise and understanding
What do we mean by the term
Gifted and Talented?
The current definition
‘Gifted and talented children are those who have
one or more abilities developed to a level significantly
ahead of their year group – or those with the
potential to develop these abilities.’
DCFS: The Standards Site
In England the term ‘gifted’ refers to those pupils who are capable of
excelling in ‘academic’ subjects:
english, mathematics, science, IT, history, geography, modern foreign
languages and drama.
‘Talented’ refers to those pupils who may excel in areas requiring
visio-spatial skills or practical abilities such as games and PE, art or
music.
Leadership skills, analytical and questioning skills, ‘multiple intelligences’
are features which define a way of learning which fits outside this
‘subject’ based learning model.
The expectation is that………
• a school will identify its most able or potentially most able pupils
• these pupils may be identified for attainment / potential in any
area of school life or for achievements beyond school
• a school’s register will reflect the make up of its pupil intake
• Gifted and Talented pupils can be found in every classroom in
every school
• identification is contextualised to the school
What are the characteristics of gifted and
talented pupils?
In comparison with peers when engaged in their area of expertise
G&T pupils tend to:
• show a passion for particular subjects and seek to pursue them
• master the rules of a domain easily & transfer their skills to new problems
• analysis their own behaviour & consequently use a greater range of learning
strategies than others
• make connections between past & present learning
• work at levels beyond those expected for their age
• engage in depth with the subject & show intellectual maturity
• produce original & creative responses to common problems
• actively engage in debate & discussion on a particular subject
They may also:
be reluctant to show their skills and abilities
be isolated and perceived as or perceive themselves as ‘the
only one’
have special educational needs
be from low socio-economic groups
learn English as an additional language
have medical conditions
be in public care
be from different ethnic or cultural groups
come from a family under stress
be at risk of disaffection and exclusion
ACTIVITY: identify the learning characteristics
of high ability BME/EAL pupil/s in your
school.
Are there other characteristics that you could
add?
Above average
ability
Task commitment
G&T learners
Renzulli’s three-ring
model of giftedness
Creativity
Where the 3 rings overlap is said to be where gifted and talented
students are found.
Gardener’s multiple intelligences
intrapersonal
interpersonal
naturalistic
bodily kinaesthetic
Multiple Intelligences
Logico-mathematical
musical
spatial
Verbal-linguistic
Belle Wallace’s High performance constellation
INTELLIGENCES
Bodily kinaesthetic
Linguistic
Logical- mathematical
Spatial
Musical
Spiritual
Personal
Inter – personal
Intra - personal
ZEAL
Interests
Ego – strength
Motivation
Self – esteem
Sensitivity
Maturity
KNOWLEDGE
Knowing that …..
Knowing how to …..
Knowing when to …..
Thinking skills
Problem – solving
strategies
PERFORMANCE
CREATIVITY
Imagination
Lateral thinking
Independence
Divergence
Originality
Flexibility
heredity + early learning experiences + general environment
LGT Model of BME/EAL & G&T
What characteristics do learners need to enable
them to achieve? – the 4 Rs
• Resilience – desire to stick at it
• Resourcefulness – able to find the tool to enable independence in learning
• Reciprocity – able to learn alone & with others
• Reflective – understanding of self as a learner
Based on the works of Guy Claxton
Teaching key skills
Benefits:
• develops independence and understanding of how to learn
• enables pupils to engage in the enquiry process
• promotes the importance of applying skills and flexibility
ACTIVITY: Consider ways in which a key skills approach could be used
to support the learning of BME/EAL pupils in your school.
Identifying process
Q: Why do we identify pupils?
Criteria for identifying pupils
‘Schools have the discretion to
decide how best to identify their
gifted and talented pupils but are
likely to obtain the best results by
drawing on a wide range of
information sources, including both
qualitative and quantitative
information. A range of popular
methods for identification are listed
below.’
What criteria do we use?
• Teacher nomination
• Checklists
• Testing-achievement, potential and
curriculum ability
• Assessment of children’s work
• Peer nomination
• Parental information
• Discussions with children
DCSF 2008
• Using community resources
ACTIVITY:
How does your school currently identify
pupils?
What criteria does your school use?
Do any of these methods disadvantage
BME/EAL pupils?
Underachievement
BME and EAL pupils are identified as groups that are at risk of
underachievement.
This implies that BME / EAL pupils with potential high ability are
at risk of underachievement.
Pupils may underachieve for a variety of reasons.
Underachievement may be caused by ‘ barriers’ that inhibit learning
pathways.
Pupils who underachieve may…….
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have low self-esteem
manipulate their environment to make themselves feel better
tend towards a superior attitude to those around them
find inadequacy in others, in things, in systems, to excuse their own behaviours
Sometimes pupils with abilities in one or more areas of learning may also
suffer from a disability or difficulty in others. This can present a considerable
barrier to the achievement of potential, as well as leading to frustration and
disaffection.
What we need to do………
The key aspects of underachievement that need to be
taken into account and considered are:
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What are the indicators of underachievement?
What are the causes of underachievement?
What are some ways of countering underachievement?
Are there potential causes due to dual or multiple exceptionalities?
Some barriers mask potential and lead to
underachievement
ACTIVITY: How might some of these barriers mask BME/EAL pupils’
potential?
• level of language comprehension in English
• level of literacy in English
• understanding of school processes including the way the curriculum
is delivered
• opportunity for enrichment experiences
• cultural differences and values
What other barriers might there be for BME/EAL pupils in your
school?
Learning and Teaching strategies
Strategies for supporting gifted and talented
learners in the classroom
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Differentiation
Thinking time / Reflection time
Open ended learning activities
Risk taking and opportunities to deal with both success and failure
Thinking and questioning skills
Learner as researcher
Learner as the expert
Balance of depth, pace and breadth
Blooms Taxonomy
Evaluation
Synthesis
Analysis
Application
Comprehension
Knowledge
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1
test
recommend
name
define
convince measure
decide
describe
tabulate
discriminate summarise
tell
support
who
label
compare
identify
explain
examine quote collect
conclude judge
plan
select
show
where
summarise
substitute assess
grade
when
create rearrange
differentiate
rank
list
compose
extend predict distinguish
integrate combine
what is?
discuss associate interpret
formulateprepare
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5
2
modify rewrite
generalise
infer
invent
design
order select
apply
modify
examine
describe estimate
contrast
solve
demonstrate
arrange
relate
separate experiment
change
compare
explain
illustrate
complete
show
divide
classify
discover
connect
calculateclassify
analyse
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3
4
5
6
2
Knowl
edge
Comprehens
Application
Analysis
Synthesis
Evaluation
LGT teacher tools
• A set of resources to help provide for gifted and talented students
http://www.londongt.org
• Organised around the three core areas of identification, provision
and evaluation
• Provide ready-to-use training materials for use in school
• REAL project: materials that support the identification and
progression of high ability BME & EAL pupils
http://www.londongt.org/real/
Most Difficult First
– don’t get GT to do
everything – only give
them challenging work
and open ended
activities
Differentiate by
Process and Content –
By outcome is NOT
enough!
Higher Order
Questions – use
Blooms Taxonomy for
prompts. Create
Questioning
Classroom. Allow time
to answer Qs.
Use of IT is carefully
planned and is not
seen as add-on –
ensure activities relate
to objectives
Planning – ensure all
abilities planned for
with extension activity
for more able –
consider
breadth and depth
Grouping – use a
variety of groups to
engage GT
Activate Prior Knowledge
and Accredit Prior
Knowledge – build on what
they know – use mind
mapping, concept maps,
graphic organisers to
demonstrate knowledge and
understanding
Develop
Independence – allow
GT students some
choice in their learning
– use Activity Choice,
set own targets etc.
Build in time for
reflection of learning
Gifted &
Talented
Checklist
Develop collaborative
learning with
Thinking and
Problem Solving
Skills in all areas of
curriculum
Planning issues –
ensure activities for
GT children ties in with
their interests and
learning styles.
Consider whole class
teaching – look for ways to
offer extension in each part
of your lesson – from the
starter session to the
plenary session. Allow time
for thinking and use high
level language
Planning the development of the project in
your school
Possible project activities……..
• What is the current learning experience of the pupil/s in
the project?
• What strengths? Are there any barriers? APP
• What strategies shall we use? – L&T resources, mentoring,
involving parents, peers, interventions
• How will you evaluate impact?
• How will you record?
What do I need to consider?
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What do I want to do?
When am I going to do it?
What activities will be undertaken?
Who do I need to include?
How will I share what I learn?
Draft a provisional action plan outlining costs and activities.
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Gifted and Talented Black Minority Ethnic and EAL pupils