CLIL
A case study: Spain
In this presentation…
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What does CLIL stand for again?!
CLIL in Spain – country background
CLIL in Spain – what the law says
Four main areas of CLIL in Spain
Some considerations
Practical tips
What does CLIL stand for again?!
• It stands for: Content and Language
Integrated Learning
CLIL in Spain – country
background
Spain – country background
SPAIN
Official languages (apart from Spanish)
• Population: 46 million
• 17 autonomous communities
• 4 official languages
• Catalan
• Galician
• Basque
Student population in state
education in Spain
2007-08
TOTAL
2008-09
6.686.309
+ 182.655
6.868.964
619.939
-2.111
617.828
1.826.163
-3.278
1.822.885
Secondary (ESO) 12-16
2.600.466
+ 62.066
2.662.532
Primary (Primaria) 6-12
1.639.741
+ 125.978
1.765.719
Pre-school (Infantil) 0-6
Upper Secondary
(Bachillerato) 16-18
CLIL in Spain - legislation
Subjects taught in foreign languages
• “Education authorities can authorise that
part of the subjects taught in the
curriculum can be given in a foreign
language… The aim being that students
will acquire the basic terminology for the
subject in both languages”
Four main areas of CLIL in Spain
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International schools
Individual private school initiatives
Local authority initiatives
Local authority sponsored ‘bilingual
sections’
5. British Council bilingual schools project
1. International schools
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Usually outside mainstream school system
Follow target language/culture syllabus
Not in market for EFL textbooks
May use imported materials
Usually several schools (English, French,
German etc) in each big city
2. Individual private school
initiatives
• Private schools add CLIL classes as a response
to local authority sponsored projects in the
public sector
• Most typical in primary
• Often ‘non-linguistic’ subjects (Art, PE)
• Science also common
• Little communication between schools
• Little training or support
• English teachers doing the CLIL classes
3. Local authority sponsored
‘bilingual sections’
• Present in most regions of Spain but in varying
numbers
• Started in Primary and moving into Secondary
• Wide range of subjects – depends on available
teacher
• More training and support
• Subject teachers doing CLIL classes
• Often only one group in the school year doing
CLIL
4. British Council Bilingual
Schools Project
• 7-10 hours CLIL per week
• Native speaker teachers recruited in UK or
US
• Language & Literacy, Science, Geography,
History, Art
• Yearly seminar for all schools involved
• Training from the British Council
Some considerations
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Timetable
Choice of subject areas
Teacher availability
Resources available
Evaluation
How to select material
1. Timetable
• How many hours do students have of
English as a foreign language per week?
• Are there any subject areas which already
have content delivered in English?
• How many hours of another subject would
it be feasible to do in English?
2. Choice of subject areas
• Which subject areas would be the most suitable
for bilingual teaching?
• Which subjects contain a practical element
which would make learning in a second
language easier?
• Which subjects contain some language that may
overlap the language being taught in the English
classroom?
• Are there any subjects which are clearly
unsuitable?
3. Teacher availability
• Are any teachers of other subjects able to
speak English to the necessary level?
• Do the English teachers have the capacity
and/or qualifications to teach another
subject?
• Are both sets of teachers willing to take
part in the scheme?
• Do these teachers have sufficient flexibility
in their timetable?
4. Resources available
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Multimedia resources
Library resources / reference material
Local teacher centres
Published materials
5. Evaluation
Some considerations regarding how the
subject area is evaluated:
• Do we evaluate it according to the same
criteria as if it were conducted in the
students’ L1?
• Do we evaluate the level of the foreign
language as well as students’ knowledge
of the subject area?
6. How to select material
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Is there enough material available?
Is the linguistic level appropriate?
Is it suitable for the age group?
Is it attractive and motivating?
Some practical tips
• Choose a subject area
• Brainstorm all the topic areas within that subject
• Put them in order of suitability to be taught in
English
• Consider the main topics, language and
vocabulary students are learning in English at
that level
• Is there any overlap between topics and
vocabulary in the subject area and the English
syllabus?
• Set up work groups with other subject teachers
Summary
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What does CLIL stand for again?!
CLIL in Spain – what the law says
Four main areas of CLIL in Spain
Some considerations
Practical tips
Questions?
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