When Johnny Comes Marching Home
Reintegration Problems and Concerns
of Military Service Members Returning
from Combat
Presenters
Dr. Edgardo Padin, Ph.D.
Dr. John Schupp, Ph.D.
Dr. Roger P. Buck, Ph.D.
Human Toll of Traumatic Events
This Presentation will . . .

Be presented in three general
topic subsections:
 War’s impact on the
individual

How stress reactions impact
interpersonal relationships
of the returning veteran

College program
recommendations to best
meet the needs of returning
veterans

Explore the complexities of
human responses to, and
recovery from traumatic
experience.

Characteristics needed in
program development and
support programs to ensure
academic and vocational
success in military veterans
You may be permanently changed by a
traumatizing experience, but you do
not have to be permanently
“damaged”.
Roger P. Buck, Ph.D.
War and human stress reaction
The Five Major Trauma Research Topic Areas
Psycho-Physiological
Individual/Personal Characteristics
Trauma Specific Characteristics
Treatment Modalities/Outcomes
Social Factors
Psycho-Physiological

Studies that provide insight into alteration in the brain as
well as other physical reactions to trauma. Including the
impact that Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has on cognitive
processes.
Individual/Personal Aspects

Identification of characteristics such as age, sex, moral
development, and cognitive level and how these factors
might determine an individual’s reaction to traumatic
experiences.
Trauma Specific Issues

These research investigations reveal how
different aspects such as intensity, duration,
and type of trauma, impacts human responses.
Treatment Modalities/Outcomes

There is a significant amount of literature which
focuses on treatment outcomes and modalities
utilizing the knowledge obtained from research.
Evidence based best practice models are
derived from this research.
Social Factors

The impact social support or lack of support has
on an individual and their ultimate reactions to
crisis/traumatic experiences.
Five Major Topic Areas
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Psycho-Physiological
Individual/Personal
aspects
Social Aspects
Trauma Specific
Characteristics
Treatment Modalities
and Outcomes
What is Trauma?
Researchers attempt to develop a clear understanding of “trauma”
through critique and description of its characteristics - there is no
single definition of trauma



Judith Herman reported: “trauma overwhelms the ordinary human
adaptations to life” . . . “and trauma events generally involve threats
to life, or bodily integrity or close personal encounters with violence
and death” . . . And “confronts people with extremes of helplessness
and terror and evokes the responses of catastrophe”
R. Cohen said that “a traumatic event is an event that severely
challenges the long-held cherished beliefs and expectations of the
individual exposed to it”
C. Monohan stated: “Trauma is an extraordinary frightening event
that overwhelms the victim with feelings of terror and helplessness. .
. . Encounter with defenselessness can create memorable emotional
pain, confusion, and behavioral disruption.”
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of
Mental Disorders (4th ed.) DSM-IV


Trauma is referred to as “an extreme traumatic stress involving
direct personal experience of an event that involves actual or
threatened death or serious injury, or other threat to one’s physical
integrity, or witnessing an event that involves death, injury, or a
threat to the physical integrity of another person.”
Symptoms that occur following traumatic events fall into many
different diagnostic categories with “anxiety disorders” (Post
Traumatic Stress Disorder, PTSD) being one of the most prominent.
What factors determine response to
potentially traumatic events
16 Things We Know About Trauma

1. People with childhood
trauma are higher risk of
health problems as adult

2. Childhood trauma victims do
increased risk behaviors
(smoking, excessive alcohol
use)

3. Many people have
significant trauma history
which they don’t reveal

4. Domestic violence, child
abuse, alcoholic and neglectful
parents cause trauma
responses in their children

5. Suicide rate among trauma
survivors is higher than nation
avg

6. Military Reserves have
higher suicide rate than regular
military
16 Things We Know About Trauma



7. Combat veterans of today’s
war have higher suicide rate
than at any time in U.S. History
8. Military personnel with
multiple tours of duty in combat
are higher risk for PTSD
9. Trauma victims often don’t
seek professional help

10. Many military men and
women do not seek
professional help

11. Much of the public and
even many mental health
professionals are uninformed
of lifelong impact of trauma

12. Some trauma victims
become perpetrators
16 Things We Know About Trauma

13. Divorce rates and failed
relationships are higher among
people with trauma history

14. There are predictable and
normal responses to abnormal
events that appear extreme but
subside over time

15. The whole person is
affected by traumatic events:
Physical, Cognitive, Emotional,
Behavioral, Spiritual

16. Population exposure model
indicates the closer a person
is in proximity to an event the
more severe the response
Complex PTSD

Chronic Trauma
results in more
complex symptoms:





Concentration Camps
Prisoner of War
Prostitution Brothels
Repeated Child Abuse
Repeated tours of Combat
in war zone
Complex PTSD

Difficulties experienced by those who have
history of chronic trauma

Avoid talking and thinking about trauma experience due to
overwhelming nature

Alcohol and substance abuse to avoid and to numb feelings

Self mutilation and other forms of self harm

Suicide
Complex PTSD

Cont’d
Additional issues:

Person repeatedly abused is often mistaken as someone who
has a “weak character” when they don’t leave a perpetrator

Survivors of chronic trauma are often misdiagnosed as having
Borderline, Dependent, or Masochistic personality disorder

Survivors who are faulted for the symptoms they experience as a
result of victimization are unjustly blamed

A new diagnosis may prevent clinicians, the public and those who
suffer from trauma from mistakenly blaming survivors for their
symptoms
Healing and Recovery
7 Things Trauma Victims Seek to Recover

1. Sense of Personal
competency

5. Trust in self and capacity to
build trusting relationships

2. Personal autonomy
(understand self and how to
relate to the world)

6. Develop an understanding
about the traumas impact on
sense of connection with the
world and others

3.Understand personal impact
& how to integrate the
objective experience and their
subjective responses

7. Personal identity,
personality, self-image

4. Intimacy & Trust
Values/Spirituality

The importance of the spiritual component cannot
be “understated” when traumatic experiences occur.

Those who have some belief in a power greater than themselves
tend to develop an understanding of the event through “meaning”
they assign.

Understanding and meaning are the first steps toward recovery
and resilience.
5 Major Aspects of Recovery and Resilience

Trauma focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy –
Treatment as needed

Four Central Dimensions of Recovery

Grief and Bereavement

Anniversaries

Memorials, Ceremonies and Rituals
Foci of Treatment
CRAFTS






Cognitive problems
Relationship problems
Affective problems
Family problems
Traumatic behavior problems
Somatic problems

(From Judith A Cohen, M.D., Medical Director, Center for Traumatic Stress in
Children & Adolescents, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA)
Four Central Dimensions of Recovery
Aspects of the Four Central Dimensions
Self
Problem
Internal
(The self that does the action)
Others
External
(The self is acted upon)
“Self”
is based on:
 Beliefs
 Fears
 Identity-Who I am in this
world
 Health
 Attitude-Positive or
Negative
 Knowledge-Self
Recognizes about world
 Meaning-Way self
interprets world
“Others”
“Problem”
“System”


The (what happened) or
the thing that the person
must recover.
From the problem we
derive:
A. Cause
B. Effect
C. Possible Solutions
System
Significant people & events:
 Family
 Peers
 Providers
 Larger Society
Primarily the Mental Health
System:
 Diagnosis
 Medications
 Facilities/Programs
 Professionals
 Disincentives
Other systems that affect
recovery:
 Educational Legal/Penal
 Human Services
 Larger Society
Grief and Bereavement

Grief: Process we go through
in adjusting to loss of close
relationship

Grief: inevitable companion to
love and attachment

Death evokes realization of
one’s own mortality & causes
fear of death or conversely
desire for death (Join a fallen
comrade)
Grief and Bereavement

Survivor guilt often exists

Guilt due to fact they are still
living

Guilt for not saving the person

Guilt for not making the dying
process easier for the person
that died
Cont’d
Grief and Bereavement

Cont’d
Complications of bereavement








Prolonged grief or traumatic grief
Onset or recurrence of Major Depressive disorder
Onset or recurrence of Panic Attacks
Increased vulnerability to PTSD
Alcohol and other substance abuse
Poor nutrition, low levels of exercise
Suicidal ideation
Onset or worsening of health problems
Anniversaries

Symptoms of anniversary reactions include:

Re-experiencing symptoms of PTSD


Avoidance symptoms as in PTSD


Reactivate feelings, physiological responses and thoughts that
occurred at the time of the event
Avoid situations, places, or people that are connected to the
event
Arousal symptoms as in PTSD

Nervous and on edge, unable to sleep or concentrate,
increased irritability, and are more on guard
Memorials, Ceremonies and Rituals




Ritual can be defined as an expressive, symbolic act that
creates a special time and space in which the
participants experience themselves as a unique group
Rituals may be performed repetitively or once, public or
private
Rituals may be sacred or secular, traditional or created
A created ritual may be appropriate for a specific
individual or set of circumstances

For example: At the Oklahoma City Bombing during the
ceremony all participants were given roses – there was a
spontaneous act where many rescue workers threw their roses
into the pit in honor of those killed on the site.
What is “Trauma Informed”

All supports and interventions:

Are based on the knowledge that symptoms exhibited
by survivors are directly related to the traumatic event.

These experiences are the cause of mental health,
substance abuse and behavioral problems.

Must address survivor needs with an awareness of the
link between trauma event and predictable human
responses which are normal responses to abnormal
life events.
Resource Listing

National Center for Post Traumatic Stress
Disorder (NCPTSD) (www.ncptsd.va.gov)

National Child Traumatic Stress Network
(NCTSN) (www.nctsn.org)

National Center for Trauma Informed Care
(NCTIC) (www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/nctic/)

Sidran Institute (www.sidran.org)
What the Soldier Brings Home:
Combat Stress, Trauma &
Readjustment
Edgardo Padin-Rivera, Ph.D.
VA Medical Center
Cleveland, Ohio
“No one comes
back unchanged”
COL (Dr.) Tom Burke,
Department of Defense,
Director of Mental Health Policy
Life on the Front
To understand what the soldier brings home, one needs to look at how the
environment of war gets inside the mind.
Life on the Front:
How Combat Shapes Minds, Emotions, &
Behaviors
Prolonged exposure to combat stress
• Soldiers are under constant stress over long period of time
• Are exposed to multiple types of terrorism and life threatening events.
• May witness or participate
in multiple atrocities
• Develop a mindset of
“act immediately, debate later”.
• Habituated to rigid, highly
structured “military” concrete
thinking.
• Being on constant alert, or
“hyper-aroused” becomes
a way of life.
Life on the Front:
How Combat Shapes Minds, Emotions, &
Behaviors
 86% received artillery fire.
 93% were shot at with small arms.
 77% fired at the enemy.
 95% saw dead bodies or remains.
 89% were attacked or ambushed.
 86% know a troop injured or killed.
 65% saw dead or injured American.
 69% saw injured women/children
and were unable to help.
-- These numbers correspond in part to a study in the New England Journal of Medicine and pertain to service members in Iraq.
Life on the Front:
How Combat Shapes Minds, Emotions, &
Behaviors
In Iraq & Afghanistan, there is no true ‘safe zone’ or
‘rear’, there is a sense of
danger in all areas and
occupations all the time.
The stresses and demands
on cognitive and emotional
capacities are many and
almost constant.
Life on the Front:
How Combat Shapes Minds, Emotions, &
Behaviors
Exhaustion is constant. The soldier does not have energy or time to
process events until after leaving the battlefield.
The violence is scary, but also
exhilarating and immediately rewarding.
Many returning soldiers say combat was
the most exciting and important
thing they have ever done. Many
are bored when they come home.
Life on the Front:
How Combat Shapes Minds, Emotions, &
Behaviors
Many face loss of comrades that can be emotionally
devastating. Nothing is more
important to a soldier than his war
brothers.
For many service members,
a comrade’s death is
an overwhelming
experience, often leading
to prolonged unresolved
mourning and anger.
What the Soldier Brings Home
The PTS Syndrome
• Intrusive thoughts/memories
• Nightmares
• Avoidance/isolation
• Anger/angry outbursts
• Hyper-startle response
• Flashbacks
• Hyper vigilance
• Feelings of grief, guilt, &
loss…
What the Soldier Brings Home
It’s not just about PTSD
•
Disillusionment with “civilian life”
& activities.
Challenging of one’s identity
& core beliefs.
– Irritability & anger toward non-military.
– Profound feeling of alienation
from others.
– Social isolation.
–
•
•
Memories of events that can be
difficult to integrate.
Self-blame or guilt for acts of war.
• Despair or hopelessness about future.
• Physical health problems
• Alcohol and drug abuse
What the Soldier Brings Home
Post-Combat Battlemind
• Heightened sensory awareness of sights, sounds & smells.
• Action oriented ways of coping with new experiences.
• Identification and closeness with their military unit and
comrades who have shared similar experiences.
• Regimentation into highly structured and efficient routines.
• Profoundly realigned ideals, values & identity shaped by war.
• Habituation to intensity and extreme emotions of combat life.
Coming Home: Life, Work, Learning
Greatest need after traumatic
experiences is for active
engagement, affiliation, and
comfort available through
supportive relationships.
Greatest (unrealized) fear
of most returning soldiers
is engagement, affiliation,
and intimacy.
Coming Home: Life, Work, Learning
What They Say Are Problems (from Focus Groups)
●
Wanting to be left alone - Social avoidance/isolation
●
Sensitivity to loud noises and jumpiness – hyper-arousal
●
Anger, lack of patience - irritability
●
Chronic joint pain, generally ankle, knee and back pain
●
Memory problems or "lapses“ - trouble concentrating
●
Drinking or smoking too much
●
Personality changes, emotionally distressed
●
Body image issues: scars, weight changes, etc.
Coming Home: Life, Work, Learning
Obstacles to Restoring Previous Ties
•
Homecoming feelings of joy and euphoria are short lived (Eventually
not reinforcing).
•
Attempts to restart old ways of interacting, old roles fail.
•
Difficulties arise in trying to generate a “new normal”
(rigidity, fears, isolative struggles get in the way).
•
Civilian life at home may not have the edge and adrenaline and “life or
death” purpose associated with wartime duty.
•
Problems of internal chaos impinge on relationships.
Coming Home: Life, Work, Learning
Problems Reconnecting with Friends & Community
• Difficult for soldier to feel “at ease”
with previous friends.
• Soldier may find self unable to share
experiences with non-combat
acquaintances.
Problems Reconnecting in Family
• Military is seeing highest divorce
rate and domestic violence
incidents in 30 years.
• Stress, distrust, fear of intimacy,
readjustment to new relationship.
Coming Home: Life, Work, Learning
Difficulties with Public Interactions
• Tension about the “politics” of war
• Public has mixed views of the war.
• Awkwardness on both sides:
• Public may not always know what to do or say.
• Veteran too often becomes a community media event.
• Veteran unsure who he/she can talk to.
• Questions can arise about:
What will they want me to talk about?
What can I talk about?
How will they react to a story or event?
Coming Home: Life, Work, Learning
Learning Environment Problems
Veteran learning capacity vs instructor expectations.
–
–
–
May not be able to focus on single subject for long periods of time.
Has difficulty with “vague” subject matter or mixed conclusions. Need for
concrete outcomes.
mTBI issues may create short term memory deficits
(difficulty with details, memorization, etc)
Coming Home: Life, Work, Learning
Learning Environment Problems
•
Internal chaos (intrusive combat images and memories) may intrude on
ability to concentrate, pay attention.
•
Hyper-arousal (on guard), in crowds, among new persons, changing
environments (new classroom each course), may create tension,
irritability, anxiety.
•
May feel others expect things he/she may not be able to do or meet.
•
•
Other students may behave differently toward him/her.
•
Social isolation leads to difficulty seeking help for studies, working
with other students.
Subject Matter or Presentation may arouse anger, irritation, isolating
response (politics, history, social sciences are especially red flags).
Coming Home: Life, Work, Learning
The perception of positive community support
whether or not it is used is one of the best known antidotes to
chronic mental health problems after a traumatic event. So…
If you see a returning service member
this month, just say thank you.
Contact Information
Edgardo Padin-Rivera, Ph.D.
Chief, Psychology Services
Cleveland DVA Medical Center
Cleveland, Ohio
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 440-526-3030 x6900
Contact Information
Roger P. Buck, Ph.D.
Director, Counseling Services
Hocking College
3301 Hocking Parkway
Nelsonville, OH 45764
Phone: 740 753-6133
[email protected]
Helping America’s Best, Brightest and Bravest get their degree
By Dr. John Schupp- SERV National Director
To create a Successful First year veteran program



First day they walk onto the campus What works, What doesn’t.
How to impact retention
 What works, what doesn’t
How to make it self-sustaining
 Don’t cancel the program when the grant runs out
Guidance Counselors/High School experience

Decision to join the military




Usually happens in 7-8th grade
They do not fall into the College prep category
Not exposed to College process
Grades tend to drop after the decide


Classes won’t apply to the military
Good enough to just pass


Focus is on their military life
Preparing their family/friends for when the enlist
The first day they walk onto the campus

Show/Tell them where to park


No uniforms- they don’t know who is in charge


E-mail them a map if possible
Campus is mass chaos compared to the military
Provide a personal walk through

All the important areas (with a fellow vet if possible)





Veteran lounge (if you have one)
Student Veteran Association/group official
Certifying official
Cashiers/Financial Aid
Registrars
The first day they walk onto the campus cont’d

Provide them what they need to know
Nothing frivolous


Introduce them to faculty/staff that are veterans

Get this list ahead of time


They don’t need to know all the other organizations on the 1st day
They will make sure that they look out for the new student vet
Give them a list of what is needed from them

Transcripts, placement exam dates, etc

They will follow these directions very closely
Veteran Orientation

Try to have a group veteran orientation


Bring reps from the community to the event




Most student orientations are for 18yr olds
 Most veterans cannot tolerate them
Dept of Veteran Affairs Health and Benefits if possible
 Local Vet Center
 Community Based Outpatient Clinics
County services
 Veteran Service Commission
Community Veteran Organizations
 AMVETS, VFW, Local Service Officers

Important people for filing claims
They will do this for free
Veteran Orientation cont’d

Certifying official

Important to meet with them


This paperwork is of the utmost importance
Student Veteran Advisor

Very important position


Someone adept at military transcripts and MOS
Must understand time constraints of GI Bill
 They cannot waste semesters on non-important classes
The

st
1


Try to group with other veterans for Gen Ed classes
Place with veteran friendly professors
Try to have all classes on 2 days/wk or 3 days/wk



semester
Class selection very important


day of class- the
st
1
Allows them to schedule VA appts on other off days
Allows them to get a part-time job if needed
Show classroom locations before school starts
Warn them of the cost of books

Book stipend won’t kick in until after 1st month
The 1st day of class- the 1st semester cont’d

Encourage tutors on first day of school

They won’t want to at first



Sign of weakness
Try to find student veteran tutors
Warn them of the cost of living allowance
delays

Won’t get first check until 6-8 weeks after 1st
day
1st semester- Their Class Experience- professor

The Lecture



They are used to ‘briefing’
 This is what you need to know, now go do it
It is difficult to determine what they need to know
 Many lectures are full of all kinds of information
 Professor does not tell them what they need to know

Up to the student to figure it out
The professor

Some do not agree with their decision to serve
 Daily subject matter may drift to volatile topics
 Many veterans are trained to diffuse conflicts

Some have a more difficult time than others
 If it gets to bad, try to have them change classes
1st semester- Their Class Experience- students

Briefings


100% concentration
Arrive 15 minutes earlyand prepared







Not 100% concentration
Students arrive late

If late, do push-ups
Information given can be
life and death
Absolutely no talking
Questions afterward
Lecture





No push ups
Students leave early
Texting
Talking
Face-booking
All of this causes
distractions to the student
veteran
1st semester- Their Class Experience- Classroom

Military



Environment can cause harm
20-30 members in squad
People/houses are checked





Weapons
IED’s
Insurgents
When room is ’cleaned’


Squad can occupy it safely
Risk has been reduced
Classroom

Room is not ‘cleaned’


Students are not ‘checked’


Have to occupy it anyways
Backpacks can cause alarm
Environment not cleared

Environment can cause harm


Focus is on the environment
Not the lecture/assignment

Grades drop
Degree Completion Variables
Credits earned after 1st and 2nd year

Overall GPA after 1st and 2nd year

Summer credits

Full or Part Time
Graduation variables- Credits Earned/GPA

Earned 4yr degree

1st yr




1st yr

2.75 GPA Univ
2.39 GPA Comm College
2nd yr
Attended-no degree
20 or more Credits earned



58 or more credits earned
2.91 GPA
Less than 20 credits



Less than 2.50 Univ
Less than 2.32 Comm College
2nd yr

31.6 or more credits earned
2.13 GPA
Civilians- Full time needed (12/more credit hrs) 1st year
First year GPA is critical to graduation
Retention/GPA data after cohort
completion- student vets in civilian classes
Students grade level
2
senior
1
junior
3
sophomore
4
freshmen
10 Total AVG
Avg
Cr hrs
110
90
64
32
Avg
GPA
2.65
2.55
2.84
2.48
2.63
SERV
Students grade level
0
senior
3
junior
8
sophomore
12
freshmen
23
Proprietary and Confidential
Avg
Cr hrs
110
90
64
32
Avg
GPA
N/A
3.47
2.86
2.38
2.69
Veteran Variables- Courses Offered

Some Gen Eds are more difficult than others


They have been out of high school for 4yrs or more
English and Math are most difficult



Have not had math in awhile
Proper english not spoken/written
 Acronyms, commands etc.
Communications, Sociology, Psychology 1st semester



They have been taught to communicate in many cultures
Military is all about Psychology, Sociology
Sign language is a good foreign language course
Credits earned/GPA’s veterans
Veteran Cohort classes 1st year

Youngstown State University- Fall 2009





Sociology 17 students 3 cr hrs-3.33 GPA
General Psychology 21 students 3 cr. Hrs-2.70 GPA
Communication 5 students 3 cr. Hrs- 3.60 GPA
Math. Elementary Algebraic models –
 6 students1.14 GPA
26 total different students in these 4 classes
Graduation variables- Summer courses

Summer Classes and decreasing drop out
rate

One Summer term (4 credits)


10 credits or more

54.8% Continue on to complete next full academic year
61.1% Continue on to complete next full academic year
Every summer term completed

Increases graduation by 11.2%
Veteran Variables- Summer classes

Many veterans will take summer courses


65% take them on 3 univ campuses sampled
They are on a tight schedule


They continue their BAH


Are used to the monthly expense check
They continue enrollment


It’s a mission to complete
Less chance for VA to mess it up
Summer courses Increase graduation chances
Graduation Variables-Full or Part Time

Degree attainment after 6 years

Part Time students

14.9% obtained degrees or certificates





2.2% associates degrees
12.7% certificates
0% Bachelors degrees
73.4% were no longer enrolled after 6 years
Full time students

64.4% obtained degrees or certificates




8.3% associates
12.4% certificates
43.7% Bachelors degrees
28.2% were no longer enrolled after 6 years
Veteran Variables- Full/Part time

Most Veterans will go full time

Latest data shows 82% are full time

They get full time BAH
 Like the monthly expense check
Their time is limited
 Only 36 months allowed- not credit dependent
 Need to finish in 4 each 9 month academic years
They want to finish and get on with their lives
 They feel that they are behind everyone else



Full time increases chances for graduation
What type of campuses are they at?
% at Univ
Total on Univ campus
6,964
61.1%
% at CC
Total on CC campus
4,432
Total on OH campuses
11,396
Universities have 4yr of veterans
CC’s only have 2yrs of veterans
SERV
Proprietary and Confidential
38.9%
Was there a shift to Univ’s?
% of
Fall 08 total
Fall
09
% of Spring
total 2010
% of
total
Universities 5,132 59.3% 6,708 60.6% 6,964 61.1%
Community
Colleges 3,522 40.7% 4,356 39.4% 4,432 38.9%
Totals
8,654
11,064
11,396
New GI Bill makes Universities more attractive than
Community Colleges
What the trends show

Universities are gaining enrollment


No longer limited by ~ $1,300/month Montgomery
Older age group at Universities


Community Colleges are losing enrollment


Student veterans avg age ~24
1st version GI Bill makes the Univ’s more attractive
New GI Bill version 2.0

Allows for OJT/certificates
May create an increased demand for CC’s
Other variables affecting enrollment


Veteran dept/person
Certifying official


Veteran Lounge/center on campus


Full time job, or other responsibilities
Providing a gathering place for the veterans
Total student veteran population

Is there a critical mass that is needed
Veterans Dept or Person?
Comm College
Department
1.36%
Person
4.28%
3,658
82.44%
779
17.56%
% change
University
Department
3.42%
Person
5.14%
total
% of total
5,654
81.93%
1,247
18.07%
% change
total
% of total
Other Variables
Variable
Location
Student
union
% Change
% enrollment
-2.49%
65.40%
Variable
Location
Student
union
% Change
% enrollment
2.67%
37.25%
Comm College
Of Veteran office
Web
Page
Administration
yes
no
11.23%
34.60%
1.19% 5.17%
82.58% 17.42%
Universities
Of Veteran office
Web
Page
Administration
yes
no
5.41%
62.75%
3.13% 7.56%
85.99% 14.01%
Certifying Official Duties
% Change
% enrollment
Comm Colleges
Sole responsibility
4.43%
74.57%
one of many
-6.34%
25.43%
Universities
% Change
% enrollment
Sole responsibility
6.90%
74.57%
one of many
-4.60%
25.43%
Impact of a veteran lounge
% Change
% enrollment
% Change
% enrollment
Comm Colleges
yes
no
3.90%
25.24%
1.20%
74.46%
Universities
yes
5.60%
36.75%
no
2.70%
63.25%
Total campus veteran population
% Change
% enrollment
% Change
% enrollment
Comm Colleges
over 300
2.7%
66.58%
under 300
0.27%
33.42%
Universities
Over 400
Under 400
4.90%
88.19%
-2.86%
11.81%
If the vet population is high enough, the veterans find
each other, support each other and enrollment increases.
This shows that Veteran Resource Centers are needed
Student Veteran organization
% Change
% enrollment
% Change
% enrollment
Comm Colleges
Yes
-3.10%
13.41%
No
2.70%
86.59%
Universities
Yes
No
5.10%
30.52%
3.20%
69.48%
Dedicated Web Page Impact11,000 veterans total
• Community Colleges
Have
Don’t Have
1.19%
82.58%
5.17%
17.42%
• Universities
Have
3.13%
85.99%
Don’t Have
7.56%
14.01%
Veterans will not make their decision based on a
web site.
They did not decide to defend their country based
on a website
The Reality

2,142,719 Deployed since 9/11- as of June 2010



260,610 Currently Deployed
1,532,980 Active Duty, 609,739 Guard/Reserve
The vast majority of them are already home!
CTS Deployment File June 10
SERV
Proprietary and Confidential
Total Deployed by State- Active Duty +Guard/ Reserve
since June 2010
10,725 8,761
65,497
11,554
5,531
25,568
25,557
11,562
12,071
9,866
31,935
24,218
13,764
76,846 63,550 81,898 39,940
32,969
18,453
37,748
19,396
20,893
63,192
25,744
33,360
12,678
23,914
36,303
5,325
28,482
17,243
7,108
13,044
21,249
56,444 83,027
12,022
184,721 18,245
4,622
15,772
55,274
26,413
48,690
29,410
52,440
267,720
29,209
CTS
deployment
File Jan 2010
SERV
Proprietary and Confidential
206,699
States with most Deployed
State
% of state
Deployed population
1.Texas
267,720
0.99%
2.Florida
206,699
1.01%
3.California
184,721
0.46%
4.New York
83,027
0.39%
5.Pennsylvania
81,898
0.60%
6.Illinois
76,846
0.54%
7.Ohio
65,740
0.51%
8.Washington
65,497
0.90%
9. Tennessee
63,192
0.88%
59,985
0.54%
10. Michigan
Texas, Florida
and California
make up 31% of
the total
deployed
Total Deployed Branch Of Service-Nation
ARMY
NAVY
MARINE
CORPS
AIR FORCE
COAST
GUARD
TOTAL
ACTIVE
DUTY
657,801
345,240 228,345
297,615
3,979
1,532,980
30.48%
16.43% 10.58%
13.95%
0.19%
71.63%
ARMY
GUARD &
RESERVE
NAVY
RESERVE
416,578
38,861
39,725
113,687
888
609,739
19.31%
1.78%
1.91%
5.34%
0.03%
28.37%
MARINE AIR GUARD COAST
TOTAL
CORPS & AIR FORCE GUARD RESERVE
RESERVE RESERVE RESERVE FORCES
What the data shows

If given the right environment

Student veterans will succeed in greater numbers than
civilians


Happened in 1948-1956, 78% graduation rate
“Right environment”




Veteran only classes
Veteran Resource Centers on campus
Veteran professors
Veteran Advocates
What the campuses need

Funding- start up costs


Centers of Excellence for Veterans Student Success (FIPSE act) Grant July
2010
 16 campuses received $6M in grants
 Schupp needs your help for 2nd round of funding for 2011
Veteran Resource Center Act 2011


Schupp needs your help for this to be enacted/funded

1/3 $ from campus, 1/3 $ from community = matching federal $
Alternative methods of funding (non-govt, non grant)



Start up costs can be covered
Stay tuned for more details in future webinars
Let Schupp/Innovative Educators know if this interests you
Campus Responsibility

Once program is started-must be self-sustained




Cannot cancel program due to grant money ending
This is not your typical freshmen demographic
 Once faith/trust is given by veterans to campus
 Campus must return the faith/trust
Cancelling successful program will cause major problems
 Veterans leave, and never come back
 Veterans feel misled, betrayed

Can cause re-enlistments, major Psychological challenges
Campus must have a sound business plan

Tuition dollars from veteran enrollment can support program
With Their Military Experience and Their
College Degree
WE can make this generation
 The Next “Great Generation”
John Schupp
[email protected] (440) 488 – 6416
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