From the FIE to the IEP
Jim Gonzales
ESC Region XIII
[email protected]
April 4, 2008
No Monkey Business!
1
Personal Goal?
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GOALS
1. To learn how to use data sources to guide us
to creating an appropriate PLAAFP
2. To learn how to align our PLAAFP to our
Annual Goals
3. To learn the basic structure of our curriculum
4. To learn how to unpack a standard
IEP?
An IEP is like _____________ because…
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Are We On the Same Page?
• Special Education is seen not as a separate and
special place for learning, but as a set of services and
supports, that reach above & beyond general
education
• The IEP is the “whole enchilada”
– FOR ALL
• Present levels of academic achievement and functional
performance, measurable annual goals, assessment status,
nonparticipation with nondisabled students, all needed services
fully described (amount, frequency, duration, etc.)
– FOR SOME
• Transition goals & services, behavior plan, ESL needs, Braille,
communication needs, assistive technology, short-term objectives
or benchmarks
Adapted by Jim Gonzales from Nolet, McLaughlin, 2005
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Curriculum Access Continuum
Special Education & Related Services
Expanded
Curricula
Knowledge & Skills
General Curriculum
No
Accommodations or
Modifications
Accommodations
Modifications
Alternate
Achievement
Standards
5
A New Way to Think of IEPs?
New Approach
Old Approach
Isolated Assessment
Strengths/Deficits Identified
Discrete Skills
Individualized
Measurable
Observable
Isolated Instruction
Addresses the
Became the Curriculum
Disability
Adapted from Nolet, McLaughlin, 2005.
Becomes a Tool
Linked to the Curriculum
Annual Goal
Short Term Obj
PLOPs
Multiple Samples of Assessment
General Curriculum is the
Starting Point
Monitor Affective & Cognitive Operations
PLAAFPs
What Does the FIE Tell US?
• Helps identify why the student is having
difficulty
• Determines whether the student meets
eligibility criteria for an area of disability
• Recommends instructional strategies,
accommodations, and interventions to help the
student in the school setting
• Meets legal mandates
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Based on evaluation
When you
have to
learn something
Provide
current
information
PLAAFP
From a variety
of sources
Related to area
of need
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Round the Room & Back Again
PLAAFP Data Sources:
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 Work samples
 Photographs
 Videotape
 Therapy notes
 Parent communication
 Standardized assessment
 Anecdotal records
 Narrative records
 Statewide assessment
 Benchmark assessment
 Teacher-made tests
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Pitfalls to Avoid
• Using the category of eligibility as a PLAAFP, e.g.,
“Johnny has a learning disability in reading and
language”
• Stating only a vague PLAAFP, such as “Johnny has
difficulty reading,” rather than stating it in
measurable terms. When instruction is the needed
service, a measurable PLAAFP and goal are required
• Including so much information in the PLAAFPs
section of the IEP that the specific PLAAFPs related
to the child’s priority goals are lost in the verbiage
(Bateman & Linden, 2006)
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Writing a PLAAFP
• In what area(s) do there appear to be needs?
• Focus on current strengths within area of
need
• Use verbs that are objective, measurable &
accurate
NEED
9
MEASURABLE
Writing
FOCUS
(PLAAFP)
Pre-Writing
When given a familiar topic, on
average Jim will generate a 15
word draft independently.
NEED
9
MEASURABLE
Reading
FOCUS
Comprehension
(PLAAFP)
Comprehends
approximately 50% of the
material read
NEED
9
MEASURABLE
Physical
Access
FOCUS
Active
Movement
(PLAAFP)
Given a weight bearing
position, student uses head
control to activate switch
on 2 out of 10 trials when
asked to respond to a
question.
NEED
9
MEASURABLE
Reading
FOCUS
Comprehension
(PLAAFP)
Can correctly identify the
main idea from 3rd grade
text 50% of the time in
multiple choice format
NEED
9a
MEASURABLE
Writing
FOCUS
Mechanics &
Legibility
(PLAAFP)
Student requires
adapted paper
with preformatted
margins for
unstructured
writing tasks
NEED
9a
MEASURABLE
Language
Arts
FOCUS
Grades
(PLAAFP)
Only passed one
semester in
Language Arts last
year.
NEED
9a
MEASURABLE
Language
FOCUS
Answering
questions
(PLAAFP)
Correctly answers 1/3
inferential questions
orally after silently
reading an independent
level text.
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PLAAFPs
Practice
• Find your group
• Use your sample FIE to help you create
some PLAAFPs
– Area of need
– Focus on strengths within area of need
– Make it measurable & observable
• Remember this is your Baseline!
Know Your Sources!
Levels of Support
Minimal
Moderate
Maximal
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Type?
Sample Goal
Jim will acquire 20 vocabulary words that relate to activities in his community and
home.
Nichole will independently request to use word prediction software for narrative
language arts assignments as needed.
Given eighth grade expository material to read silently, Jim will correctly
answer 95% of a variety of multiple-choice comprehension questions over
that material.
Given a supervisor’s direction to look both ways twice before crossing, Jim
will cross the street safely 100% of the time.
Nichole will use a stand pivot transfer to transfer in and out of wheelchair given
physical assistance at her hips.
By the end of the year, Jim will write a paragraph containing at least a main idea and
two supporting details.
For three consecutive days Jim will initiate at least five appropriate verbal
comments/conversations with peers during lunch, recess and other
unstructured times.
Nichole will actively participate for a minimum of 15 minutes of upper extremity
weight lifting, using 2lb. hand weights.
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PLAAFP to Goal
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PLAAFP to Goal
Example #1
Given seventh grade
expository material, Jim
answers 50% of the
comprehension questions
correctly.
Given 7th
grade
expository
material
to read
silently,
Jim will
correctly
answer
65% of a
variety of
comprehe
nsion
questions
over that
material.
Given 7th
grade
expository
material
to read
silently,
Jim will
correctly
answer
75% of a
variety of
comprehe
nsion
questions
over that
material.
Given 7th
grade
expository
material
to read
silently,
Jim will
correctly
answer
85% of a
variety of
comprehe
nsion
questions
over that
material.
Given 7th
grade
expository
material to
read
silently, Jim
will
correctly
answer 95%
of a variety
of
comprehens
ion
questions
over that
material.
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PLAAFP to Goal
Example #2
• PLAAFP
– Jim correctly produces /s/ in 2/10 opportunities in word initial
position while naming pictures using a mirror and verbal
models
• Objectives/Benchmarks
– 1. Jim will produce /s/ in 4/10 opportunities in word initial
position while naming pictures using a mirror and verbal
models
– 2. Jim will produce /s/ in 6/10 opportunities in word initial
position while naming pictures following verbal models
– 3. Jim will produce /s/ in 8/10 opportunities in word initial
position while naming pictures following verbal models
• Annual Goal
– Jim will independently produce /s/ in 8/10 opportunities in
word initial position while naming pictures
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PLAAFP to Goal
Example #3
• PLAAFP
– Jim traces the first 2/9 prewriting (vertical, horizontal)
strokes with accuracy.
• Objectives/Benchmarks
– 1. Jim traces the first 3 prewriting strokes (vertical,
horizontal, and circular) strokes
– 2. Jim copies the first 3 prewriting strokes from a close up
model with no size/spatial parameters.
– 3. Jim copies the first 4 prewriting strokes from a close up
model staying within a 6 inch square boundary.
• Annual Goal
– Jim copies the first 4 prewriting strokes (… cross) from a close
up model staying within a 3 inch square boundary.
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PLAAFP to Goal Practice
• Review your PLAAFP Organizer
• Create an Annual Goal aligned with your
PLAAFP
– Create your short-term objectives/benchmarks
leading up to your annual goal
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GOALS
1. To learn how to use data sources to guide us
to creating an appropriate PLAAFP
2. To learn how to align our PLAAFP to our
Annual Goals
4. To learn the basic structure of our curriculum
5. To learn how to unpack a standard
TEKS Alignment
TEKS 101
• Introduction
– Provides you with a description of what every student should
know and be able to do by the end of the year
• In Grade 8, students refine and master previously learned
knowledge and skills in increasingly complex presentations, reading
selections, and writing. Eighth grade students continue to read
widely in classic and contemporary selections and informational
texts. Students are able to identify characteristics of various literary
forms. Eighth grade students are able to select and use different
forms of writing for specific purposes such as to inform, persuade, or
entertain. Students produce multi-paragraph compositions with
varied sentence structure. Eighth grade students edit their writing
based on their knowledge of grammar and usage, spelling,
punctuation, and other conventions of written language. Students
produce final, error-free pieces of written composition on a regular
basis. Students use citations competently and write by following
accepted formats for research reports. Eighth grade students present
oral and written reports, including presentations strengthened by
visuals and media.
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF THE
TEKS
TAKS OBJECTIVE
Knowledge & Skills Statement
Student
Expectation
Student
Expectation
Student
Expectation
TAKS Objectives
“umbrella statements” that serve as headings under which
student expectations from the TEKS can be meaningfully
grouped
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF THE
TEKS
TAKS OBJECTIVE
Knowledge & Skills Statement
Student
Expectation
Student
Expectation
Student
Expectation
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Knowledge & Skills Statement
This broad statement describes what students should know and be
able to do for the listed grade level
• (5.6) Reading/word identification. The student uses a
variety of word identification strategies. The student is
expected to:
• (7.12) Reading/text structures/literary concepts. The
student analyzes the characteristics of various types of texts
(genres). The student is expected to:
• (A.3) Foundations for functions. The student
understands how algebra can be used to express
generalizations and recognizes and uses the power of
symbols to represent situations. The student is expected to:
• (7.2) Scientific processes. The student uses scientific
inquiry methods during field and laboratory investigations.
The student is expected to:
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF THE
TEKS
TAKS OBJECTIVE
Knowledge & Skills Statement
Student
Expectation
Student
Expectation
Student
Expectation
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Student Expectations
This specific statement describes what students should be able to
do to demonstrate proficiency in what is described in the
knowledge and skills statement
(8.6) Reading/word
identification.
The studentThe
uses a variety
• (5.6)
Reading/word
identification.
of word identification
strategies.
The student
is expected to:
student
uses a variety
of word
identification
strategies. The student is expected to:
– (A) apply knowledge of letter-sound correspondences,
language structure, and context to recognize words (4-8);
– (B)
usestructural
structural
analysis
to identify
wordsknowledge
with
(B) use
analysis
to identify
words,root
including
of
prefixes
dis-,
non-,
and in-; and(7-8);
suffixes
Greek andsuch
Latinas
roots
and
prefixes/suffixes
and such as -ness,
-tion, and -able (4-6); and
– (C) locate the meanings, pronunciations, and derivations of
unfamiliar words using dictionaries, glossaries, and other
sources (4-8).
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Content vs. Performance
• State Standard:
– Student will identify, analyze, and apply
knowledge of the structure and elements of
fiction
• Content
– Structure and elements of fiction
• Performance
– Identify, analyze, and apply knowledge of
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Examples
• Determine a text’s main (or major) ideas
and how those ideas are supported with
details
• Content
– Text’s main (or major) ideas
• Performance
– Determine, supported with details
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Examples
• Round whole numbers to the nearest ten
or hundred to approximate reasonable
results in problem situations
• Content
– Whole numbers to the nearest ten or
hundred, in problem situations
• Performance
– Round, approximate reasonable results
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Examples
• Compare and order integers and positive
rational numbers
• Content
– Integers and positive rational numbers
• Performance
– Compare and order
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Key Ideas
1. Identified a need
2. Identified baseline data (PLAAFP)
3. Explore the student’s EGL standards
4. Unpack the aligned TEK to promote
student’s progress in the general curriculum.
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Unpack the TEKS
• By when?
• Who?
• Will do?
• What?
• How well?
• Under what conditions?
By when?
Specified date of expected
completion.
Who?
Specifies who will be expected to
accomplish the goal.
Will do?
A verb that can be observed when
executed.
Tells specifically what the student
will do.
What?
How well?
Under what
conditions?
Specifies the minimum standard
you establish for accomplishing
the goal.
Indicates the context in which the
goal will be observed.
By when?
Who?
Will do?
What?
How well?
Under what
conditions?
• By when? By January 2008,
• Who? Jim
• Will do? will write
• What? a final version of a creative essay
• How well? with no spelling or punctuation errors
• Under what conditions? after his writing partner has
proofread his first draft.
(c) retell or act out the order of
important events in stories (K-3);
• By when? By the end of the year,
• Who? Jim
• Will do? will retell orally
• What? the beginning, middle, and end of the passage/text
• How well? with at least 3 supported text details
• Under what conditions? after hearing text read aloud.
(a) travel independently in a large
group while safely and quickly
changing speed and direction
• By when? By the end of the year,
• Who? Jim
• Will do? will travel independently
• What? while keeping pace with his class
• How well? without falling
• Under what conditions? using a walker.
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Unpack the TEKS
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Share Time!
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