ECML Workshop project IMPEL
•Project C5 of the ECML 2nd
medium-term programme (IMPEL)
Towards an Action Plan for ELP
Implementation
Dick Meijer
Why is this topic in the
program?
• Implementing the ELP needs a kind of a masterplan in
which all the ins and outs of an implementing process
are covered
• This part of the workshops deals with this challenge
• The input:
– general ideas about an action plan or action plans
– Case studies
• The outcome:
– First drafts of action plans related to own situation
Project C 5 IMPEL
ELP implementation support
Soutien à la mise en oeuvre du PEL
ELP in use
• Questions to be addressed
– In several countries the ELP is in use in others it is
still at a starting point, but main question is/will be
... how can we increase the use of ELP?
– If not yet in use .. how can be profited from the
experience from others?
– Who is to be convinced (learner, teacher, end
user, authorities (incl. headmaster)?
– Implementation.... bottom up or top down?
– What is role of publishers?
5
Project C 5 IMPEL
ELP implementation support
Soutien à la mise en oeuvre du PEL
Towards an Action Plan for ELP
Implementation
– What should be reached when? Target?
Quantitative? Qualitative? Satisfaction?
– What could be a critical moment?
– Which stakeholders are/ could be the most
important partners in an ELP implementation
process ?
– Does the product (the ELP) have enough
arguments from itself to convince?
– .....
Project C 5 IMPEL
ELP implementation support
Soutien à la mise en oeuvre du PEL
Towards an Action Plan for ELP
Implementation
• The stakeholders
• Learners
• Teachers (school)
– headmasters
• End users
– Employers
– ‘receiving’ schools
• Parents
• National/regional
authorities
– society
• Publishing houses
– Publishers
– Textbooks designers
Project C 5 IMPEL
ELP implementation support
Soutien à la mise en oeuvre du PEL
Towards an Action Plan for ELP Implementation
Stakeholders in relation to each other or where to make
interventions
Parents
Learners
research
ELP
Publishers
End user
national/regional
authorities
teacher/school
Project C 5 IMPEL
ELP implementation support
Soutien à la mise en oeuvre du PEL
Switzerland
Certificates
Diplomas
Goals
Standards
Curricula
Programmes
Outcomes
ELP
Assessments
Tests
Instruments
LearningProcesses
Textbooks
Materials
Situations
Intervention logic
Bulgaria
Inputs
Assumptions and risks
Activities
Assumptions and risks
Outputs
Outcomes
Assumptions and risks
Project C 5 IMPEL
ELP implementation support
Soutien à la mise en oeuvre du PEL
Towards an Action Plan for ELP
Implementation
• Levels of implementation
– Supra (Council of Europe - CEFR)
– Macro level (educational policy)
• ELP in educational system
• ELP in (national/regional) curriculum
– Meso level (school)
• ELP in school curriculum
– Micro level (classroom) –Teacher training
• ELP in classroom
• Instructional design
• Pedagogical and didactical design
– Nano level (individual)
Project C 5 IMPEL
ELP implementation support
Soutien à la mise en oeuvre du PEL
Levels of Implementation
• MACRO
– National or regional educational authorities
– Implementation
•
•
•
•
•
ELP in educational system
ELP in national curriculum
Legislation (?)
National policy (CEFR and national curriculum)
Assessment
Role in assessment
System of evaluation
Levels
Possible Strategic Objectives
• Macro level: Development of tools to involve national or
regional policymakers in ELP-project (if necessary)
• Macro level (Outside school): Development of
informative materials for employers and parents.
• Meso level: Development of curriculum statements
including examples of good practice. Development of
activities for school managers
Implementation activities
• Develop a strong marketing and/or information
structure : an action plan
• Points of attention
• On national level (macro): relate national curriculum to
CEFR
• School level (meso): teachers are key persons
– Good practices
– Experience themselves
– Headmasters: what is the influence in schools or
classrooms and what are the benefits?
Benefits for headmasters
•
•
•
•
They get clear educational (language) standards
They get more possibilities to cope with diversity
They might get the language teachers 'on the move'
They get more coherence between languages learned at
school
• They can set up goals for shorter periods
• They can see (and show) the ongoing language learning
in their schools.
‘Outside school’ activities
•
Some examples for end users (macro level):
– Distribute newsletters (electronic or traditional) for teachers in the project
and others who are interested
– Build information platform to share positive feelings and exchange
solutions (all)
– Write informative articles in press (national and local) (parents/employers)
– Show good practises (parents/employers)
– Let parents gain experiences with ELP
– Send information to platforms of employers (flyers)
– Let employers gain experiences
– Show international transparency (employers)
– Organize conferences with as much as possible impact.
Risks
• Information should be very practical
• Information should fit into their world
• Examples of good practice should not be to
specific (‘in my situation impossible’)
• What kind of problem will be solved by using
the ELP?
Aspects of an Action Plan
• Timeframe: in what year will the activity take place?
• What kind of events will be / have been organized? Why
this activity? Recommendable to others?
• Which group(s) of stakeholders is/was/are/will be
involved?
• Objectives, goals, aims? Successful?
• Other information which can be useful to others or
shared with others (e.g. budgets, number of persons
involved?
Workshop activity
(after presentation of case study)
• Working in pairs to identify elements of relevance to
your own practice (15 minutes)
• Exchange information on implementation activities in a
larger group (excluding teacher training activities) and identify
the potentially most effective ones (30 minutes)
• Coffee break (15.30)
• First draft of an action plan related to own project (30
minutes)
• Collect activities related to stakeholders and questions
to the panel put them on posters (30 minutes)
Project C 5 IMPEL
ELP implementation support
Soutien à la mise en oeuvre du PEL
Towards an Action Plan for ELP Implementation
Function of ELP
• Instrument for self
assessment (tests)
• Learner / teacher / school
/ end user (intake)
• Reporting instrument
(certificates, diplomas)
• School (end user) teacher
/ employer/ parents
• Planning instrument
(Standards, curriculum,
programmes)
• Learner / teacher / school
• Language teaching
(textbooks, didactics)
• teacher / school
Project C 5 IMPEL
ELP implementation support
Soutien à la mise en oeuvre du PEL
Towards an Action Plan for ELP Implementation
Function of ELP
•
•
Instrument for self assessment
(tests)
•
Reporting instrument (certificates,
diplomas)
•
•
•
•
Planning instrument (Standards,
curriculum, programmes)
•
•
•
Language teaching (textbooks,
didactics)
•
Learner / teacher / school / end
user (intake)
INTERVENTION ON MESO/MICRO
LEVEL
School (end user) teacher /
employer/ parents
INTERVENTION ON MACRO/MESO
LEVEL
Learner / teacher / school /
national authorities
INTERVENTION ON
MACRO/MESO/MICRO LEVEL
teacher / school- INTERVENTION
ON MICRO LEVEL
Workshop activity
• Working in pairs to identify elements of relevance to
your own practice (15 minutes)
• Exchange information on implementation activities in a
larger group (excluding teacher training activities) and identify
the potentially most effective ones (30 minutes)
• Coffee break (15.30)
• First draft of an action plan related to own project (30
minutes)
• Collect activities related to stakeholders and questions
to the panel put them on posters (30 minutes)
Dutch approach
The Dutch approach to implement the ELP
Dick Meijer
Summary Dutch ELP-project
• Since start very enthusiastic
• Introducing and implementing looked to be 'a piece of
cake'
• Because of the aims and intentions of ELP
• Almost all institutes were involved (exception: teacher
trainers !!!)
• Tried to develop 7 different portfolios (implementation
strategy: all sectors should be involved)
•
•
•
•
•
Piloting ELPs
Different projects (e.g. border ELP in German)
Regulare meetings with teachers
Developing new descriptors
Developing learning activities
Conclusions after three years of
piloting
• So many different portfolios were not necessary
• For the learners it was difficult to understand the
descriptors (not used to look at foreign language
learning that way)
• Focussing on reporting function is not enough to
implement ELP
• Teachers need also to be 'owner' of the portfolio
(involving them in new developments)
• The ELP should be embedded in the curriculum
Dutch portfolios
Validated portfolios:
• 9+ pupils (primary schools)
• 12+ pupils (lower secondary education)
• 15+ pupils (upper secondary education)
• Vocational education
• Migrants
Language portfolio for language teachers
English in primary and lower secondary education
Accessibility for (young)
learners
• One conclusion was: descriptors are difficult to
understand especially for (young) learners.
– they did not always recognize communicative
situations 'behind the descriptors'
– they had difficulties to imagine foreign
language situations if they are not used to go
abroad
Consequences
• If you want to implement the ELP, the problem of
accessibility should be solved
• The pedagogical role of the portfolio became more and
more important
• So:
– we tried to find ways to make the portfolio more
accessible to the 'users'
– We developed series of language learning activities,
linked to the descriptors (activities are concrete,
realistic, imaginable, have an addressee)
Checklist
• Checklist exists of descriptors and situations
and explanations
• It links to learning activities
Dutch portfolio is a 'complex'
project
• No stand alone activities: developing a common Dutch
language portfolio website
• Student/pupils: Portfolio - efficient learning activities
• Textbook authors (a.o.): Portfolio - language profiles
(series of concrete interpretations of descriptors in
terms of can do-statements)
• Schools: Portfolio and help for implementation (Focus
on matching secondary and vocational education)
• Implementation strategy: ad hoc by trying to solve
problems
Implementation strategies
• ELP for ‘everybody’ (now website)
• Strong focus on pedagogical part
• Involving teachers in school projects (at least two
teachers)
• Developing learning materials
• Organizing workshops, seminars etc.
• Articles written by professionals
• Involvement of all pedagogical institutes
• Maim aim: learning a language becomes interesting and
effective
• Focus on ongoing learning
• Almost no quantitative targets
• Research projects on two ELP projects
• Budget pro year
Situation now
Aantal users per profiel
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7-mar-2007
7
18-dec-2006
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
• 20.000 users
– 2.000 teachers
– 18.000 learners
• Implementing activities (bottom up):
–
–
–
–
–
Networks of schools
Publishers
Teacher training institutes
ELPs for all learners (primary till adult education)
Curriculum activities – ongoing learning, closing gap between
schools and between upper and lower secondary
Aspects of an Action Plan
• Timeframe: in what year will the activity take place?
• What kind of events will be organized (Maybe have been
organized? Why this activity? Recommendable to
others?
• Which group of stakeholders was involved?
• Objectives, goals, aims? Successful?
• Other information which can be useful to others or
shared with others (e.g. budgets, number of persons
involved?
Workshop activity
• Working in pairs to identify elements of relevance to
your own practice (15 minutes)
• Exchange information on implementation activities in a
larger group (excluding teacher training activities) and identify
the potentially most effective ones (30 minutes)
• Coffee break (15.30)
• First draft of an action plan related to own project (30
minutes)
• Collect activities related to stakeholders and questions
to the panel put them on posters (30 minutes)
Working group 3
John Thorogood/Dick Meijer
• Getting ELP into maximum number of classes
Practicalities ----7
• Ensuring impact on methodoligy ---- 6
• Is there life after ‘implemenation’ (life long)
• Institutionalisation -------6
• Continuity between phases ----5
• Maintaining momentum/interest ---- 3
• Acceptance outside formal educational process ----1
Working group 3
What do we hope to get from the
workshop?
•
•
•
•
•
•
After implementation – what next?
Learning from experiences of others
How to motivate other teachers (e.g. to integrate ELP)
Good practices in teacher training (implications for TT )
Better networking between participant countries
ELP ‘versus’ the CEFR (reporting vs pedagogic
functions): resolve (perceived) conflicts arising from
coexistence of ELP and CEFR
• Sharing ideas on material development
Ideas for an action plan
A kit for ELP-related teacher training
(ECML Project ELP-TT, C6)
Involvement of teachers
Project C 5 IMPEL
ELP implementation support
Soutien à la mise en oeuvre du PEL
Towards an Action Plan for ELP Implementation
Stakeholders in relation to each other or where to make
interventions
Parents
Learners
research
ELP
Publishers
End user
national/regional
authorities
teacher/school
Project C 5 IMPEL
ELP implementation support
Soutien à la mise en oeuvre du PEL
Towards an Action Plan for ELP Implementation
Role, and possible effects of using, ELP
• Instrument for self
assessment (tests)
• Learner / teacher / school
/ end user (intake)
• Reporting instrument
(certificates, diplomas)
• School (end user) teacher
/ employer/ parents
• Planning instrument
(Standards, curriculum,
programmes)
• Learner / teacher / school
• Language teaching
(textbooks, didactics)
• teacher / school
Key person: teacher
• The purpose: to support the implementation of
the ELP by
– developing a kit of materials and activities for
ELP-related teacher training;
– mediating materials and activities in a central
workshop;
– supporting national ELP training events arising
from the central workshop
• teacher training kit must be as wide-ranging as possible
– the CEFR – competences, levels and descriptors
– self-assessment in relation to the common reference
levels
– learning how to learn – a model for reflection for
teacher trainers
– learner autonomy
– language in the ELP – language(s) of presentation and
language(s) of process; plurilingualism
– developing intercultural awareness
– integrating the ELP with language curricula and
textbooks
– using the ELP to go beyond the textbook
– connecting assessment with the ELP and the
common reference levels
An example:
The intercultural dimension
• Why is this topic in the programme? – The intercultural
component of the ELP “reflects the Council of Europe's
concern with ... respect for diversity of cultures and ways of
life” and the ELP should be “a tool to promote plurilingualism
and pluriculturalism”. According to the Principles and
Guidelines the language passport should record “intercultural
learning experiences”. However, in most cases foreign
language learning takes place in classrooms far away from the
“target country”, and it is traditionally dominated by “a narrow
view of language”.[1] It is therefore necessary to look for
methods or activities to bring intercultural experiences into
the classroom, mediated through the internet and other
media. Global simulation is an activity that can give
(especially young) foreign language learners intercultural
experience.
•
[1]
D. Little & B. Simpson, European language Portfolio: the intercultural component and learning how to learn, Strasbourg, Council of Europe, 2003, p. 5.
• Working methods – Work in pairs. Invent a native
speaker of the target language by
• giving him/her a name, age, family, etc.
• decide where he/she lives (region, town, street, etc.)
• finding his/her school and give him/her a realistic
language profile
• .........
– Check the information on the internet or with a resource
person.
• The outcome of this activity should be a language
biography page
• What we want to achieve – Participants are
introduced to a number of activities they can
use to develop the intercultural experience
with their learners. Presentations on posters
should provide an overview of possible
activities.
• Cover page
• Powerpoint presentation on intercultural
learning
• Worksheet
• Language biography
• Handout
• Additional materials
– Workshop ‘Analysing a Textbook by using ELP and
CEFR’
• National events -Reports
–
–
–
–
Hamburg
Selbsteinschätzung (Hamburg)
Selbsteinschätzung
Sprachstadt
• References
Using resources
Using internet statistics for further
development
• In my opinion the tasks (learning activities) in the eELP are
okay.
• I like working with the eELP and I find it interesting
• Working with the eELP is useful
• To upload documents in the dossier To use the dossier) is,
nice, useful and interesting
• I like the idea that my teacher gives me information feedback
in my eELP on what I did well or not so well
• I can learn a language better with an eELP than without
• An eELP enables me to identify what I can do in an language
• An eELP enables me make an own planning
• I can work autonomous with an eELP
0
Met
www.europeestaalportfolio.nl
werk ik zelfstandig
Met
www.europeestaalportfolio.nl
maak ik een eigen planning
Met
www.europeestaalportfolio.nl
kan ik goed bepalen wat ik al
met een taal kan
Met
www.europeestaalportfolio.nl
kan ik een taal beter leren
dan zonder
Ik vind het leuk of interessant
of nuttig dat ik in
www.europeestaalportfolio.nl
in het dossier op kan slaan
wat ik gedaan/gemaakt heb
IIk vind het leuk of interessant
of nuttig, als mijn docent in
www.europeestaalportfolio.nl
aangeeft wat ik wel of niet
goed gedaan heb
Het werken met
www.europeestaalportfolio.nl
vind ik nuttig
Het werken met
www.europeestaalportfolio.nl
vind ik leuk of interessant
De opdrachten van
www.europeestaalportfolio.nl,
de leerzame activiteiten, vind
ik goed
700
600
500
400
1. helemaal niet mee eens
2. niet mee eens
3. niet mee eens of oneens
300
4. mee eens
5. helemaal mee eens
200
100
• User statistics
• How to use this kind of information for further
development?
• And for the implementation process?
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