Illinois RtI Network
How Can RtI/MTSS Support
Implementation of CCSS?
November, 2014
Facilitated/Presented by:
Insert name(s) here
The Illinois RtI Network is a State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG) project of the Illinois State Board of
Education. All funding (100%) is from federal sources.
The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, #H325A100005-12.
However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not
assume endorsement by the Federal Government. (OSEP Project Officer: Grace Zamora Durán)
Making
What
Check-in
connections
Applying
Outcomes
Review
PreMeeting
Survey
Results
Pre-Assessment Link
https://www.surveymonkey.c
om/r/S6NHWJF
Agenda
• How RtI/MTSS supports CCSS
• Blending RtI/MTSS for
academics and behavior
• Problem analysis for Tier 3
• Progress monitoring for Tier 3
Connection to Illinois Professional
Teaching Standards
Planning for Instruction
 The teacher understands instructional planning and
designs instruction based upon knowledge of the
discipline, students, the community, and curriculum
goals.
Assessment
 The competent teacher understands and uses
appropriate formative and summative assessments for
determining student needs, monitoring student
progress, measuring student growth, and evaluating
student outcomes.
How has CCSS
affected you?
THE HOW We
Teach
Common Core
State Standards
RtI/MTSS—
THE
FRAMEWORK
translates
into…
and becomes…
THE WHAT We
Teach
Evidence-Based
Teaching
Practices
Engaging and
Effective
Curriculum
ELA - Instructional Shifts
Shift 1: Balancing Informational & Literary Texts (K-5) Students read a true balance of
informational and literary texts. Elementary school classrooms are, therefore, places where
students access the world — science, social studies, the arts and literature — through text
Shift 2: Knowledge in the Disciplines (Grades 6-12) - Content area teachers outside of the ELA
classroom emphasize literacy experiences in their planning and instruction.
Shift 3: Staircase of Complexity - In order to prepare students for the complexity of college and
career ready texts, each grade level requires a "step" of growth on the "staircase"
Shift 4: Text-based Answers - Teachers insist that classroom experiences stay deeply connected
to the text on the page and that students develop habits for making evidentiary arguments both
in conversation, as well as in writing to assess comprehension of a text.
Shift 5: Writing from Sources - Writing needs to emphasize use of evidence to inform or make an
argument rather than the personal narrative and other forms of decontextualized prompts.
Shift 6: Academic Vocabulary - Students constantly build the vocabulary they need to access
grade level complex texts.
Source: http://www.readingrockets.org/article/51433/#shifts
Shifts in Mathematics
Shift 1
Focus
Teachers significantly narrow and deepen the scope of how time and energy is
spent in the math classroom. They do so in order to focus deeply on only the
concepts that are prioritized in the standards.
Shift 2
Coherence
Principals and teachers carefully connect the learning within and across grades
so that students can build new understanding onto foundations built in previous
years.
Shift 3
Fluency
Students are expected to have speed and accuracy with simple calculations;
teachers structure class time and/or homework time for students to memorize,
through repetition, core functions.
Shift 4
Deep
Understanding
Students deeply understand and can operate easily within a math concept
before moving on. They learn more than the trick to get the answer right. They
learn the math.
Shift 5
Application
Students are expected to use math and choose the appropriate concept for
application even when they are not prompted to do so.
Shift 6
Dual Intensity
Students are practicing and understanding. There is more than a balance
between these two things in the classroom – both are occurring with intensity.
10
From engage ny
Setting high
standards is
insufficient
Remember to address
HOW to teach
Video—CCSS and MTSS
• Watch video—Ed Shapiro—Common Core
Standards and a Multi-Tier System of Supports
• https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTIDXPK1U
D4
• Discuss at your table and share with the group:
– Does your district view MTSS as a way to support all
students or just as a way to support students who are
low-achieving? Yes/No, provide evidence for your
response
– How can we help others make explicit
connections between MTSS and CCSS?
I-RTI NETWORK
MTSS—HIGH
QUALITY TIER 1
INSTRUCTION
Teacher as “activator” or “facilitator”?
From presentation by John Hattie
An activator
ES
A facilitator
ES
Reciprocal teaching
.74
Simulations and gaming
.32
Feedback
.72
Inquiry base teaching
.31
Smaller class sizes
.21
Teaching students self-verbalization .67
Meta-cognition strategies
.67
Individualised instruction
.20
Direct instruction
.59
Problem-based learning
.15
Mastery learning
.57
Different teaching for boys and girls
.12
Goals –challenging
.56
Web-based learning
.09
Frequent / effects of testing
.46
Whole Language Reading
.06
Behavioral organizers
.41
Inductive Teaching
.06
.60
.17
Explicit Instruction and Discovery
Not an either or - but a when.
Explicit
Instruction
Discovery
Little or no
background
knowledge
A great deal of
background
knowledge in the
domain
History of difficulty,
of failure
History of success
From Dr. Anita Archer
Teaching for different phases of
learning
Phase:
• Acquisition
• Fluency
• Generalization
• Retention
Strategies:
• Develop accuracy
• Lots of practice
• Examples & nonexamples &
• Instruction in different
settings, content areas
• Judicious review
I-RTI NETWORK
MTSS—TIERED LEVELS
OF SUPPORT
More powerful instruction involves:
More instructional time
Smaller instructional groups
resources
More precisely targeted at right level
Clearer and more detailed explanations
More systematic instructional sequences
skill
More extensive opportunities for guided practice
More opportunities for error correction and
feedback
Checklist for Effective
Interventions
 Students who need more get more.
 Interventions implemented with
fidelity.
 Interventions aligned.
 Interventions matched to student
needs.
I-RTI NETWORK
MTSS—PROBLEM SOLVING AND
DATA-BASED DECISION MAKING
Problem Solving Process
Problem Identification
Is there a problem? What is it?
Problem Analysis
Plan
Evaluation
Why is it happening?
Did the plan work?
Plan Development
What should be done about it?
Illinois ASPIRE
Problem-Solving and CCSS
• CCSS provides information about expectations
which are useful in the problem identification
phase of problem solving
• Problem identification—discrepancy between
what is expected (one example—expectations
of CCSS) and what the student is currently
doing
Extreme Off Track
2-3 Years Behind
No chance for graduation in a
traditional school setting
Disengagement
Risk Factors:
1. Disengagement
•20% absenteeism
2. Behind in Credits
•Particularly Core
Course Failures
3. GPA less than 2.0
4. Failed FCAT
High Off Track
3 or more risk factors
Off Track
2 of 4 risk factors indicated
Students entering with 20%
absenteeism and/or 2 or more
F’s in 8th Grade
At Risk for Off Track
1 of 4 risk factors indicated
On Track
No risk factors indicated
Hendry County Schools
I-RTI NETWORK
ASSESSMENT
AND CCSS
Big Ideas from Mark Shinn’s
aimsweb Webinar (10/14/14)
• Assessment implications of CCSS are tied to
summative evaluation and accountability.
• CBM is a “rich task” that addresses a number of
separate standards.
• CBM tests are consistent with CCSS, especially K-5
Reading and Writing Standards.
• Frequent progress monitoring is one of the most
powerful ways to increase student achievement.
From White Paper by Mark Shinn—The relation of aimsweb, CBM, and
CCSS: All parts of meaningful school improvement
CBM as a “rich task”
• …each standard need not be a separate focus for
instruction and assessment. Often, several
standards can be addressed by a single rich task
(emphasis added).
• R-CBM is a “rich task” where students read aloud
for 1 minute, serving as a holistic test that can
contribute to understanding student performance
relative to a number of reading standards.
From White Paper by Mark Shinn—The relation of
aimsweb, CBM, and CCSS: All parts of meaningful school improvement
Reasons Not to Drop CBM to
Address CCSS
• Proactive universal screening enables schools to
intervene as early as Kindergarten entry to
provide appropriately intensive
intervention…CBM is consistent with, and
complementary to, the CCSS.
• …when students read aloud for 1 minute and
WRC is counted, what is assessed is general
reading achievement, incorporating a variety of
skills.
• R-CBM is time and cost efficient.
From White Paper by Mark Shinn—The relation of aimsweb, CBM, and CCSS: All parts
of meaningful school improvement
CBM Alignment with CCSS
• Given aimsweb CBM’s focus on basic skills
assessment, and in particular, reading, it is not
surprising that R-CBM is highly (and most)
consistent with CCSS K-5 Reading Standards.
• Aimsweb R-CBM is less consistent (i.e., content
valid) with Reading Standards for Informational
Text K-5.
• Of course, general reading ability is directly
correlated (i.e., construct-related validity) to
being able to read and comprehend
informational texts…
From White Paper by Mark Shinn—The relation of
aimsweb, CBM, and CCSS: All parts of meaningful school improvement
Key ideas
MTSS supports CCSS
implementation through:
1. High quality Tier 1
instruction
2. Tiered levels of support
3. Problem-solving
4. Data-based decision making
Time to Reflect
One thing I learned during this section…
One thing I would like to have clarified
is…
One way I could apply this learning is…
Questions/Comments
Illinois RtI Network
Integrating RtI/MTSS for
Academics and Behavior
The Illinois RtI Network is a State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG) project of the Illinois State Board of
Education. All funding (100%) is from federal sources.
The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, #H325A100005-12.
However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not
assume endorsement by the Federal Government. (OSEP Project Officer: Grace Zamora Durán)
Features of MTSS (McIntosh & Goodman, 2015)
Academic RTI
• Specific academic
assessments and
interventions
• Use of published
curricula selected by
school or district
• Use of direct
assessment of skills
• Periodic assessment
through benchmarking
periods
• Focus on grade-level
teaming
• Described in IDEA as
SPED eligibility
determination approach
PBIS
• Scientifically-based
interventions
• Instruction as prevention
• Tiered continuum of
supports with increasing
intensity based on need
• Regular screening for
early intervention
• Use of a problem-solving
model and data-based
decision rules
• Focus on teaming
• Emphasis on improving
quality of implementation
• Embedded into school
improvement plan
• Specific social behavior
assessments and
interventions
• Use of free materials that
are adapted to fit the
school’s context
• Use of indirect
assessment of behavior
• Continuous assessment of
social behavior with existing
data sources
• Focus on school-wide
teaming
• Described in IDEA as schoolwide prevention and
individual intervention
approach
From Kent McIntosh, Keynote at Fall 2014 ISTAC Leadership Conference
Conditional Probabilities
Met Spring
DIBELS PSF
Benchmark
18%
1 or more
ODRs
33%
Spring
DIBELS PSF
Int. Support
33%
Grade:
2 or more
ODRs
From Kent McIntosh, Keynote at Fall 2014 ISTAC Leadership Conference
1
2
3
4
5
What do we integrate?
(McIntosh & Goodman, 2015)
•
•
•
•
Data systems
Practices
Teaming
District Support
– Training and Professional Development
– Coaching
From Kent McIntosh, Keynote at Fall 2014 ISTAC Leadership Conference
Steps in Integrating Initiatives
1. Identify shared, valued outcomes
– What are our overall goals?
2. Defend against activities that don’t help us
meet those goals
– No free lunches
3. Find common structures (and language) that
can be integrated
– Teams, data, professional development
From Kent McIntosh, Keynote at Fall 2014 ISTAC Leadership Conference
Determining Our Language of
Collaboration
• Option to do this as an activity or discuss and
plan how this tool could be used as an activity
in their district.
• Use the tool, Determining Our Language of
Collaboration, to discuss the language of
academic and behavior components of MTSS
• Come to a consensus on language that will be
used, define terms, and add to district
MTSS manual.
Some Big Ideas about MTSS
1. Integration can be hard
2. But we're all doing the same work
3. We need to integrate our systems to solve
the big problems
From Kent McIntosh, Keynote at Fall 2014 ISTAC Leadership Conference
Time to Reflect
One thing I learned during this section…
One thing I would like to have clarified
is…
One way I could apply this learning is…
Questions/Comments
Illinois RtI Network
Problem Analysis at Tier 3
The Illinois RtI Network is a State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG) project of the Illinois State Board of
Education. All funding (100%) is from federal sources.
The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, #H325A100005-12.
However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not
assume endorsement by the Federal Government. (OSEP Project Officer: Grace Zamora Durán)
“Problems are an unexpected
discrepancy between what is
expected and what is observed.”
Problem-Solving Process:
Assessments Used at Each Step
Did the plan
work?
Summatives
What will we do?
Progress
Monitoring
What is the
problem?
Benchmarking
Why is it
happening?
Diagnostics
“The primary purpose of
problem analysis is to
understand the salient
characteristics of a problem
and use that understanding to
identify potential problem
solutions.”
Problem Analysis
Question: Why is the problem occurring?
1. Collect and review RIOT data to...
– Differentiate between skill problem vs.
performance problem
– Determine situations in which the
problem behavior is most likely and least
likely to occur.
– Identify the factors that are contributing
to the problem.
2. Generate plausible hypotheses.
I-RTI NETWORK
DEVELOPING
HYPOTHESES
…identify factors that may contribute
to the problem.
– Instructional factors
• Pace, classroom management, expectations
– Educational factors
• Schedule of activities, supervision, class positioning
– Peer factors
• Reinforcement of undesired behavior of peer
– Familial factors
• Parental disciplinary style, parental cooperation with
school
– Child factors
• Memory, academic skill level, motivation
Hypothesis Question Bank
Provide time for participants to examine
question bank and discuss how it can be used as
part of problem analysis.
Problem Analysis (cont’d)
Question: Do you have enough information (data)
to confirm or refute a hypothesis?
3. Collect additional data as needed to validate
or refute hypotheses.
4. Select most validated and alterable
hypothesis
I-RTI NETWORK
COLLECT INFORMATION:
ICEL AND RIOT
INSTRUCTION
• Instructional
philosophy
• Instructional approach
or method(s)
• Expectations/objectives
• Clarity & organization
• Pace
• Opportunities for
practice
• Duration of continuous
instruction
• Nature & frequency of
feedback
• Academic engaged time
• Classroom Management
CURRICULUM
• Content
of materials
• Difficulty level of materials
• Sequencing
• Organization
• Perceived relevance
ENVIRONMENT
• Arrangement of the room
• Furniture/equipment
• Rules
• Management plans
• Routines
• Expectations
• Peer context
• Peer and family influence
• Task pressure
LEARNER
• Appropriateness of
curriculum and
instruction
• Perception of learning
environment
• Academic skills
• Social/behavioral skills
• Adaptive behavior skills
• Motivation
• Medical Issues
Data Collection Methods to Test
Hypotheses: RIOT
Review…
Records
Cumulative Folders
Work Samples
Health Records
Observe…
Student-peer
Student-teacher
Parent-child
Classroom
Interview…
Teacher
Parents
Bus Drivers
Student
Significant Others
Test…
Curriculum-based
Behavior rating scales
Norm-referenced
Criterion-referenced
95% Group CCSS Document
Provide participants with time to review 95%
group’s document and discuss how it can be
used to contribute information for Tier 3
problem solving.
I-RTI NETWORK
CURRICULUM BASED
EVALUATION
What is Curriculum-Based Evaluation
(CBE)?
• “CBE is a systematic problem-solving process
for making education decisions.”
-Howell et al., 2008
*What to teach and how to teach it
*Alterable variables
PUBLISHED ASSESSMENTS
I-RTI NETWORK
Consortium on Reading Excellence
(CORE) measures
Assessing Reading: Multiple Measures, 2nd Ed.
• K-12
Skill areas:
• Phonological Awareness*
• Decoding & Word Attack*
• Spelling*
• Fluency
• Vocabulary*
• Comprehension
*= Tests also available in Spanish
Diagnostic Assessment of Reading, 2nd Ed.
Ages: 5-Adult
Pre-reading through high school
Administration time: Approx. 40 mins.
9 areas of reading & language:
• Print awareness
Phonological awareness
• Letters & Sounds
Word recognition
• Word analysis
Oral reading
• Silent reading comp. Spelling
• Word meaning
MISCUE ANALYSIS
FOR READING
I-RTI NETWORK
Miscue Analysis
Directions:
• Have student read CBM passage out loud
• Administrator records errors above words.
• First 10 errors are analyzed for miscue type.
Types of miscues:
• Graphophonetic
• Syntactic
• Semantic
From the National Center on Intensive Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.org/
Practice: Miscue Types
Provide an example of each error type for the underlined
word in the following written sentence:
Now is the time for all good men to come to the aide
of their country.
Possible miscues:
• Graphophonetic: mean
• Syntactic: dogs
• Semantic: people
From the National Center on Intensive Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.org/
68
Miscue Analysis Example
Janet’s Passage
Reading Fluency
(PRF)
From the National Center on Intensive
Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.org/
69
Janet’s Quick Miscue Analysis Table
Written Word(s)
Spoken Word(s)
1
exciting
extra
2
snow
now
3
trouble
trains
4
learned
listened
5
forget
figure
6
driver
door
7
snowing
snake
8
driving
dumping
9
passengers
pencils
10
boy
baby
Percentage
Graphophonetic
yes – first
part
yes – except
initial s
yes – first
part
yes – first and
end
yes – first and
middle g
yes – first and
last
Syntactic
Semantic
yes
no
no
no
yes
no
yes
no
yes
no
yes
no
yes – first part
no
no
yes
no
yes
no
yes
yes
80 %
10 %
yes – first and
end
yes – first and
last
yes – first and
last
100 %
From the National Center on Intensive Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.org/
70
Instructional Recommendations for
Janet
Janet may benefit from instruction and practice
to help her…
• Self-monitor and self-correct for meaning
– Cloze procedure
– Pencil Tap strategy
– Listen to recording of own reading
• Sound out all parts of a word
From the National Center on Intensive Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.org/
71
ERROR ANALYSIS FOR MATH
I-RTI NETWORK
Error Analysis for Math
How wrong is a wrong answer?
• Evaluate each numeral in the answer to look
for patterns in correct and incorrect digits
From the National Center on Intensive
Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.org/
73
Computation Scoring Review:
Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication
Score each correct digit in the answer from right
to left.
Example: Correct answer is 417.
From the National Center on
Intensive Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.or
g/
Student Answer
Correct Digits
417
3
415
2
47
1
74
Scoring Review: Division
Score each correct digit in the answer from left
to right, with remainders scored from right to
left.
Correct Answer
36 R 13
Student#Answer
R#
Correct Digits
37 R 1
1
26 R 23
2
From the National Center on Intensive Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.org/
75
Scoring Review: Decimals
Start at the decimal point and work outward in
both directions.
.
# #
Correct Answer
83.76
Student Answer
Correct Digits
8.6
0
84.7
2
From the National Center on Intensive Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.org/
76
Scoring Review: Fractions
Score correct digits in each part of problem
(whole number, numerator, denominator) from
right to left then add for total correct digits.
#
#
#
From the National Center on
Intensive Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention
.org/
Correct
Answer
Student
Answer
Correct
Digits
2
2
77
Item 1
Correct Answer:
3058
+ 1148
4206
Student 1:
Student 2:
3058
+ 1148
4196
3058
+ 1148
4207
What does Item 1 tell us about each student?
From the National Center on Intensive Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.org/
78
Item 2
Correct Answer:
Student 1:
From the National Center on Intensive
Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.org/
Student 2:
79
Item 3
Correct Answer:
Student 1:
Student 2:
2
2
1
1 + 3 = 5
3
3
3
2
2
4
1 + 3 =4
3
3
6
2
2
4
1
+
3
=
4
From the National Center on Intensive
3
3
3
Intervention
http://www.intensiveintervention.org/
80
I-RTI NETWORK
NATIONALLY-NORMED
STANDARDIZED ASSESSMENTS
Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests-3rd
Edition
• Grades K-12
9 Subtests
• Phonological awareness
• Listening Comprehension
• Letter Identification
• Word Identification
• Rapid Automatic Naming
• Oral Reading Fluency
• Word Attack
• Word Comprehension
• Passage Comprehension
Kay Math 3 Diagnostic Assessment
Ages: 4-6 to 21-11; Grades: K-12
Time: 30-90 minutes (untimed)
10 subtests, 3 general math content areas
• Basic Concepts (conceptual knowledge)
• Operations (computational skills)
• Applications (problem solving)
Can also use for progress monitoring - (Forms A &
B)
• Alternate forms every 3 months
Other Commonly Used Standardized
Diagnostic Assessments
• Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, 3rd Ed.
(WIAT-III)
• Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement, 2nd
Ed. (KTEA-II)
I-RTI NETWORK
PROBLEM ANALYSIS AT
SYSTEM, GROUP, OR
INDIVIDUAL LEVEL?
“If the water in the aquarium is dirty,
it makes little sense to spend our
time diagnosing individual fish.”
Amelia VonName Larsen, Florida School Psychologist
As quoted by Jim Ysseldyke in his 2009 NASP Legends of School Psychology
Address
86
I-RTI NETWORK
CASE EXAMPLE—MAVIS
Step 1: Problem ID:
Discrepancy Statement
• Expected: Third graders will receive no office
discipline referrals for hitting others on the
playground during the school year.
• Actual: Mavis has 7 office discipline referrals
for hitting others on the playground.
• Discrepancy: Mavis has 7 more office
discipline referrals than is expected.
Illinois RtI Network
Step 2: Problem Analysis
Hypothesis Statements
• Mavis hits others on the playground because
he doesn’t know how to behave
appropriately.
• Mavis gets into fights on the
playground to get attention from
his peers.
Data Collection Methods to Test
Hypotheses: RIOT
Review…
Records
Cumulative Folders
Work Samples
Health Records
Observe…
Student-peer
Student-teacher
Parent-child
Classroom
Interview…
Teacher
Parents
Bus Drivers
Student
Significant Others
Test…
Curriculum-based
Behavior rating scales
Norm-referenced
Criterion-referenced
Data Collection Methods to Test
Their Hypotheses: RIOT
Review…
Interview…
Records
Cumulative Folders
Work Samples
Health Records
Observe…
*Teacher
*Parents
Bus Drivers
*Student
*Playground Supervisors
Test…
*Student-peer on playground
Student-teacher
Parent-child
Classroom during math seatwork
Curriculum-based
Behavior rating scales
Norm-referenced
Criterion-referenced
Additional Data Revealed…
• Observational data: Mavis was standing off
by himself watching the other boys playing.
For no apparent reason Mavis then walked
over to a peer and hit him.
Additional Data Revealed…
• Interview data:
– Parents: They’ve seen him hit one of his siblings
if they are doing something he’d like to do.
– Teacher: He has hit one of his classmates for no
apparent reason, just to “get a reaction.”
– Mavis: He gets angry when he is by himself but
really wants to play with the other kids.
Step 3: Design & Implement
intervention
• Goal: By May 10, 2014 Mavis will have 0
additional office discipline referrals for hitting
others on the playground.
• Intervention:
– Provide Mavis social skills training that
focuses on how to ask to join others when
they are doing something he’d like to do and
anger management skills
– Playground supervisors will “coach” Mavis to
use his group entry skills to join a group
Step 4: Plan Evaluation
Office Discipline Referrals
8
7
Intervention started
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
1
1
0
Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
0
Week 4
0
Week 5
0
Week 6
0
Week 7
Create a Case Example
• Have each table of participants identify a case (or
make up a case) for Tier 3 problem solving. Each
table may want to select a different problem or a
different age group.
• Using the case selected, have each table create a
case example to teach others colleagues how to
do problem analysis at Tier 3.
• Select from the tools provided in the handouts.
• When participants leave they should have several
cases they can use to teach others problem
analysis.
Key ideas
• The purpose of diagnostic
assessments is…
• to address questions about why the
problem is occurring to develop an
intervention with higher likelihood
of success.
• Can’t do/won’t do assessments may
be conducted…
• as a first broad review of problem
analysis
Key ideas
• Problem analysis involves
examination of a variety of
domains—not just…
• child and family domains—to
identify hypotheses for problems
• Sometimes diagnostic tests need to
be supplemented with additional
assessments…
• to obtain reliable information
related to a pattern of errors
Time to Reflect
One thing I learned during this section…
One thing I would like to have clarified
is…
One way I could apply this learning is…
Questions/Comments
Illinois RtI Network
Progress Monitoring at
Tier 3
The Illinois RtI Network is a State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG) project of the Illinois State Board of
Education. All funding (100%) is from federal sources.
The contents of this presentation were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, #H325A100005-12.
However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not
assume endorsement by the Federal Government. (OSEP Project Officer: Grace Zamora Durán)
General Principles—Tier 3
from Joe Torgeson
Instruction must be more:
explicit,
intensive,
supportive, both emotionally and
cognitively.
Progress must be monitored.
Dangers of not using data…
Instructional decisions based on what “feels”
right or the way it’s always been done –
even if it’s not working!
“One measurement is
worth a thousand expert
opinions.”
Donald Sutherland
bike mechanic and author
105
Progress Monitoring
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Selecting tools
Creating schedules
Setting goals
Defining decision rules
Graphing progress
Analyzing data
Sharing data
I-RTI NETWORK
SELECTING TOOLS
Progress Monitoring Checklist
Useful for monitoring interventions
Sensitive to small amounts of growth
Rapid feedback
Repeatable
Similar scale
No practice effect
Similar difficulty across measures
Brief and economical
So what would be good options for fluency?
Resource for Information
about Progress Monitoring
Tools
National Center on Intensive
Intervention—
see tools charts
Technically Adequate
Comprehension
Measures
ORF
Criterion Measures
SAT Word Study
SAT Comprehension
Question Answering
SAT Word Study
SAT Comprehension
Recall
SAT Word Study
SAT Comprehension
Cloze
SAT Word Study
SAT Comprehension
Correlation
.80
.91
.66
.82
.58
.70
.71
.72
from Fuchs, L.S., Fuchs, D., & Maxwell,L. (1988). The validity of informal reading
comprehension measures. Remedial and Special Education, 9, 20-28.
I-RTI NETWORK
CREATING SCHEDULES
Summary Chart for Goal Setting in 3 Tiers and RTI
Tier
Goal Material
Time Frame and
Frequency
Criterion for
Success
Tier 1:
Benchmark
Grade-Level
Materials
Benchmark to
Adequate Progress and
Benchmark, 3 Times per “Over the Bar”
Year
Tier 2: Strategic
Grade-Level
Materials
Benchmark and Monthly Adequate Progress and
“Over the Bar”
Tier 3: Frequent
PM
Individualized Based on
Severity
Weekly
Reduce the Gap
RTI for Eligibility
Grade-Level
Materials
Weekly for 4-10 Weeks
Adequate Progress or
Reduce the Gap
112
Shinn, 2009
I-RTI NETWORK
GRAPHING
PROGRESS
I-RTI NETWORK
SETTING GOALS AND
DEFINING DECISION RULES
Decision Rules: What is a “Good” Response to
Intervention?
• Positive Response
– Gap is closing
– Can extrapolate point at which target student will “come in
range” of peers--even if this is long range
• Questionable Response
– Rate at which gap is widening slows considerably, but gap is still
widening
– Gap stops widening but closure does not occur
• Poor Response
– Gap continues to widen with no change in rate.
Decision Rules: Linking RtI to
Intervention Decisions
• Positive
• Continue intervention with current goal
• Continue intervention with goal increased
• Fade intervention to determine if student(s)
have acquired functional independence.
118
Positive Response to Intervention
Performance
Expected Trajectory
119
Observed Trajectory
Time
Decision Rules: Linking RtI to
Intervention Decisions
• Questionable
– Was intervention implemented as intended?
• If no - employ strategies to increase implementation
integrity
• If yes – Increase intensity of current intervention for a short
period of time and assess impact. If rate improves,
continue. If rate does not improve, return to
problem solving.
120
Questionable Response to Intervention
Performance
Expected Trajectory
121
Observed Trajectory
Time
Decision Rules: Linking RtI to
Intervention Decisions
• Poor
– Was intervention implemented as intended?
• If no - employ strategies in increase implementation
integrity
• If yes – Is intervention aligned with the verified hypothesis?
(Intervention Design)
– Are there other hypotheses to consider? (Problem
Analysis)
– Was the problem identified correctly? (Problem
Identification)
122
Poor Response to Intervention
Performance
Expected Trajectory
123
Observed Trajectory
Time
I-RTI NETWORK
CASE EXAMPLES
70
60
Example of Progress Monitoring Chart for “Carlos”
Words Read Correctly
Started
Intervention 150”/week
Decreased time
to 90"
Grade ROI line
50
WRC
40
Goal Line
30
20
Carlos’ weekly scores
10
0
Weeks
Decreased time Met goal!
to 30"
60
Example of Progress Monitoring Chart for “Clarissa”
Words Read Correctly
Started intervention –
150”/week
50
Increased time to 225”
Grade ROI
Line
Changed to more
intense Intervention
WRC
40
Goal Line
30
20
Clarissa’s Weekly
Scores
10
Weeks
0
Time to Reflect
One thing I learned during this section…
One thing I would like to have clarified
is…
One way I could apply this learning is…
Questions/Comments
I-RtI Network
COACHING
November Book Study
November
Assignment:
Pgs, 28-30
and Chapters
7&8
Book Study Questions
1. How does the material in the reading
relate to what we are learning in our EC
meetings?
2. How does the material in the reading apply
to the work you are doing in your district?
3. How will this content and the ideas gained
through discussion help you improve your
coaching skills?
Team Coaching & Problem Solving
Plan Evaluation
Did the plan work?
Adequate progress?
Was the goal met?
Do we need to continue
or modify the plan?
Problem Identification
What is the problem?
What is expected?
What is occurring?
What is the context?
Plan Development
Problem Analysis
What will we do?
Why is it happening?
What is the goal?
Based on why, what will we do differently?
What has the highest likelihood of
success?
How will we monitor progress & fidelity?
What resources are needed? Illinois RtI Network
When does it occur?
With whom?
Can’t do or Won’t do?
Curricula, Instruction?
Environment?
December Book Study
December
Assignment:
Select one
chapter to
read: Chapter
3, 4, 5, or 6
Extension
Activity
Planning
• SAPSI-D Action Plan
• Tier 3 Problem
Analysis in district
manual
• Tier 3 progress
monitoring in district
manual
Closing
Activities
Descargar

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