State Compensatory
Education
Program and Fiscal Requirements
October 25, 2011
Presented by: Wes Pierce
What is State
Compensatory Education?
What is Compensatory
Education?
Programs and/or services designed
to supplement the regular
education program for students
identified as at-risk of dropping out
of school (TEC 29.081)
What is the Purpose of
Compensatory
Education?
To:
• Increase the academic achievement
of at-risk students
• Reduce the dropout rate of these
students
The goal is to close the achievement between
at-risk and all other LEA students
How Will We Meet
the SCE Goal?
Using State Compensatory Education
funds, districts will provide intensive
accelerated instruction to students who:
• Have not performed satisfactorily on a
state assessment
• Are at-risk of dropping out of school
Who Are At-Risk
Students?
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Activity:
As a table group:
• Read the 13 scenario cards and decide if each
student should be coded “at-risk”
• Place the at-risk student scenario cards under
the “thumbs up” and those not qualifying
under the “thumbs down”
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
A student is considered at-risk if
he/she is under 21 years of age and
meets ANY of the following 13
criteria…
#1
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
--Is in prekindergarten, kindergarten
or grade 1, 2, or 3 and did not perform
satisfactorily on a readiness test or
assessment instrument administered
during the current school year
NOTE: Do not use previous year’s score for classification
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1
#1
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Miguel did not perform satisfactorily on the TPRI endof-year assessment in May. Upon arrival this fall, the
teacher notes his struggles and places him in
accelerated instruction even though she has not
administered the beginning-of-the-year TPRI.
#2
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
--Is in grade 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12, and did not
maintain an average equivalent to 70 on a scale of
100 in two or more subjects in the foundation
curriculum during a semester in the preceding or
current school year or is not maintaining such an
average in two or more subjects in the foundation
curriculum in the current semester
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1
#2
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Lucy is currently passing all classes during
the fall semester. She passed all but one
class last spring; however, she failed both
algebra I and biology last fall.
#3
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
As of the 2009-2010 school year:
PK or kindergarten students who did not
advance from PK or kindergarten to the
next grade level only as the result of the
request of the student’s parents are
excluded from “at-risk” identification
-- Was not advanced from one grade level to the
next for one or more school years
NOTE: Student remains at risk of dropping out of school
for the remainder of his/her public school education
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1
#3
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Johnny is in Pre-Kindergarten. Although his
academic performance has been acceptable, his
parents meet and voice concerns over Johnny
advancing to Kindergarten next year due to his
small stature. They decide to retain him in PK.
#4
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
--Did not perform satisfactorily on an assessment
instrument administered to the student under
Subchapter B, chapter 39, and who has not in the
previous or current school year subsequently
performed on that instrument or another
appropriate instrument at a level equal to at least
110% of the level of satisfactory performance on
that instrument
NOTE: See the next slide for calculating 110%
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1
How Is 110% Figured?
Calculation of 110%
Satisfactory Performance
Student Name: _________________________
Subject: ____________
Step 1:
Divide the TAKS raw score cut (the number of correct responses needed to pass the
test) by the total TAKS test items (total number of questions in the particular test).
__________ raw score cut / __________ total test items = _________% passing
27
42
64.29%
Activity: Using the TAKS Raw Score
Conversion Table, determine the
passing % for the “met standard” level
Step 2:
Multiply the percentage of the total TAKS items needed to be answered correctly by
110%.
__________% X 110% =__________% of items needed to be answered correctly
64.29%
70.72%
Activity: Using the “met standard”
percentage, determine what
percentage is necessary to meet the
110% threshold
Step 3:
Divide student TAKS score (the number of correct responses) by the total TAKS test
items (total number of questions in the particular test).
__________ student score / __________ total test items = _________% passing
28
42
66.67%
Activity: Using the 4th grade student
A’s math raw score of 28, determine
the passing percentage of the student
Step 4:
Compare Step 2 (110%) to Step 3 (student %) to ensure that the student has met or
exceeded 110% requirement.
__________110% =>__________ student %
70.72%
66.67%
Activity: Compare the 4th grade
students’ math score percentage to
the 110% required percentage to
determine the at-risk status of the
student
What Does It Take?
30
42
71.43%
Activity: Determine what raw score
would be necessary for a student to
meet the 110% threshold (70.72%) in
4th grade math this year?
#4
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Sandra failed the 3rd grade math TAKS two
years ago. She passed the 4th grade math
TAKS last year by getting the EXACT
number she needed to pass correct
#5
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
--Is pregnant or is a parent
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1
#5
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Jack and Diane are juniors and have just
become the proud parents of a baby girl
#6
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
--Has been placed in an alternative
education program in accordance
with Section 37.006 during the
preceding or current school year
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1
#6
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Colby is an eighth grader. When he was in
sixth grade, he was sent to a DAEP for
fighting. He has since learned to control
his anger and has not returned to the
alternative setting
#7
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
--Has been expelled in accordance
with Section 37.007 during the
preceding or current school year
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.;
#7
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Lily was expelled at the end of the school
year last May for code of conduct
violations. She has returned to school this
fall hoping to get a fresh start
#8
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
--Is CURRENTLY on parole,
probation, deferred prosecution,
or other conditional release
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1
#8
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Bill broke into the liquor store this summer
and was caught as he exited the premises
with some stolen beverages. He received
two years of probation
#9
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
--Was PREVIOUSLY reported through
the Public Education Information
Management System (PEIMS) to
have dropped out of school
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1
#9
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Two years ago, Kayla dropped out of
school with plans to get her GED. After rethinking her plans, she has re-enrolled and
is planning to graduate next year when she
gets caught up on her credits
#10
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
--Is a student of limited English
proficiency, as defined by Section
29.052
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1
#10
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Maria moved from Mexico when she was in 2nd
grade. She could not speak English at the
time, but has since acquired her second
language and is doing well in school. She was
exited from her school’s ESL program last year
#11
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
--Is in the custody or care of the
Department of Protective and Regulatory
Services or has, during the current school
year, been referred to the department by a
school official, officer of the juvenile court,
or law enforcement official
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1 and
19 TAC, Part II, Chapter 61, Subchapter EE , http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter061/ch61ee.html
#11
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Jake and his sister Sara came to school
last month with suspicious bruises. Both
students’ teachers reported their mother to
CPS for investigation
#12
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
For more information: The Texas Homeless Education
Office offers free technical assistance service to any
district that needs help in developing and/or
implementing its Homeless Education Plan. Call 512475-9702 or 1-800-446-3142 to speak with a
consultant. http://www.utdanacenter.org/theo/
--Is homeless, as defined by 42 U.S.C.
Section 11302, and its subsequent
amendments
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1 and
McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 2001, Section 725
#12
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Taylor and his mom have been living in
Dallas. Taylor’s mom recently received a
transfer to a job in the area. She decided
to move in with her recently-divorced sister
so they two could share the rent
#13
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
--Resided in the preceding school year or
resides in the current school year in a
residential placement facility in the
district, including a detention facility,
substance abuse treatment facility,
emergency shelter, psychiatric hospital,
halfway house, or foster group home
Refer to TEC, Sections 29.081 and 28.002(a)(1) and the TEA Financial Accountability Resource Guide -Module 9, Section 9.2.3.1
#13
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
Scenario:
Philip returned to school last week from a
one-month stay at Red River. His emotional
state has stabilized and he is currently
passing all of his classes
Who Are These
“At-Risk” Students?
For more information regarding student
identification, review the Frequently Asked
Questions at:
http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/financial.audits/SCE_QandA.pdf
Who Are These AtRisk Students?
FACT OR FIB?
Students on free-reduced
lunches are automatically
coded at-risk
Who Are These AtRisk Students?
FACT OR FIB?
Title I students are NOT
automatically at-risk students
Who Are These AtRisk Students?
FACT OR FIB?
Schools should identify at-risk
students year-round
Who Are These AtRisk Students?
FACT OR FIB?
504 and Special Education
students are automatically
coded at-risk
Who Are These AtRisk Students?
FACT OR FIB?
ALL foster children are at-risk
Foster children are under the
custody or care of the
Department of Family and
Protective Services
Who Are These AtRisk Students?
FACT OR FIB?
A 5th grade student failed the first
administration of the reading test. He
passes the second administration
getting EXACTLY the number needed to
meet standard; therefore, he remains on
the at-risk list
Who Are These AtRisk Students?
Special education students who do
not perform at the level of progress
established by the ARD committee
shall be deemed at-risk until the ARD
committee determines the student
has met the assessment goal for
exiting the student from being at-risk
What Is Local
Student Eligibility?
• MUST be adopted by the board of trustees
• Adopted criteria must be current and clearly
defined in the district improvement plan for
districts or the instructional plan for charter
schools
• Number may not exceed 10% of the number of
students who received services during the
preceding school year
• Students identified using local criteria are NOT
reported through PEIMS
Refer to Module 9, Section 9.2.3.2
LEA must maintain current
auditable documentation
regarding locally identified
at-risk students
What Is Local
Student Eligibility?
• MUST document the need for the specific
supplemental services or instruction in
the comprehensive needs assessment
and the CIP/DIP prior to providing
services to locally identified at-risk
students
• SCE allotment may NOT be used to
provide services on a campus that does
not have any state identified at-risk
students
Refer to TEC, Section 29.081(d)
How Are SCE
Funds Generated?
How Are SCE
Funds Generated?
FACT OR FIB?
Funding for state
compensatory education is
based upon the number of
students at-risk of dropping
out of school
Refer to Module 9, Section 9.2.4
How Are SCE
Funds Generated?
Funding is generated by:
• Number of students on free/reduced lunch from
district’s average of best six-month’s
enrollment in the PREVIOUS school year
• Annual allotment for students who reside in a
residential placement facility in a district in
which the student’s parent or legal guardian
does not reside
• Annual allotment for pregnant students or
students who are parents that attend school
full time and participate in a program under
Section 29.081 of TEC
• Annual allotment for military dependent
students
Refer to Module 9, Section 9.2.4
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
• Funds can only be allocated
to campuses with students
identified as at-risk
• Campus allocations should be
made based on “need”
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
• A SUPPLEMENTAL
compensatory, intensive,
or accelerated instruction
program under §29.081,
TEC
Supplement vs. Supplant: Funds cannot
be used to provide required foundational
program
Refer to TEC, Section 45.152 and Refer to Module 9, Section 9.2.4.1 and Section 9.2.3.1 for additional guidance
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
A district's compensatory education allotment shall be
used for costs supplementary to the regular education
program, such as:
• Program and student evaluation
• Instructional materials and equipment and other
supplies required for quality instruction
• Supplemental staff expenses, salary for teachers of atrisk students, and/or smaller class size
• Individualized instruction
All examples must be reasonable and necessary, and
most importantly, linked to the current comprehensive
needs assessment, goals, strategies, and evaluation
Refer to TEC, Section 45.152 and Refer to Module 9, Section 9.2.4.1 and Section 9.2.3.1 for additional guidance
Basic vs. Supplemental Programs
Regular or
Basic
Program
Your basic program would
represent the plain cake;
every student is
entitled to a regular
education,
in this case, an equal sized
piece of cake.
Supplemental
Program
The
frosting
represents
additional
support
for the student
Supplemental
Program Plus
The
candles
represent even
further additional
support
for the student
© 2011
What does “supplemental to the
basic instructional program” mean?
Sample Finding
FINDING - DISTRICT “A” FUNDED FIVE STATE MANDATED
SECOND GRADE TEACHERS WITH SCE FUNDS
Auditors found that Sample ISD was not in
compliance with the 22 to 1 state mandate.
Specifically, auditors noted that the district
hired the additional teachers with SCE funds in
order to meet the state requirement
Note: The compensatory education allotment shall not be
used to achieve the Foundation School Program student to
teacher ratio requirement of 22:1. This rule also applies
when these funds are used to upgrade the educational
program on a Title I, Part A schoolwide campuses
What does “supplemental to the
basic instructional program” mean?
Sample Finding
FINDING - DISTRICT “B” HAD NO DOCUMENTATION TO
SUPPORT COMPENSATORY, INTENSIVE, OR ACCELERATED
INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
Specifically, auditors noted that the Reading is
Fun after-school program had no
documentation to support compensatory,
intensive, or accelerated instructional
services. A review of school documentation
indicated that this program was a latchkey
after school program open to any student in
first through third grade. The district could not
provide attendance records, academic
curricula, and/or test results
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
Although SCE funds cannot be
used to fund basic PK services,
they can be used to offer full-day
services to at-risk students
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
• An alternative education program established
under §37.008, TEC
– A disciplinary alternative education program
(DAEP)----SB 1 this legislative session
expanded this to include a juvenile justice
alternative education program (JJAEP)
SB 1 also repealed the requirement to
only spend 18% of SCE funds on
DAEP…there is no longer a cap
Refer to TEC, Section 45.152 and Refer to Module 9, Section 9.2.4.1 and Section 9.2.3.1 for additional guidance
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
• Mentoring Programs for
At Risk students
• Supplementing the Dyslexia
Program
Refer to TEC, Section 45.152 and Refer to Module 9, Section 9.2.4.1 and Section 9.2.3.1 for additional guidance
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
• Support a SCHOOLWIDE Title I
program at a campus at which at
least 40% of the students are
educationally disadvantaged (as
listed in most current NCLB application)
•
•
Schoolwide status cannot be from a feeder
pattern, Ed-Flex waiver, or previous status
Schoolwide flexibility is NOT extended to
district level activities
Refer to TEC, Section 45.152 and Refer to Module 9, Section 9.2.4.1 and Section 9.2.3.1 for additional guidance
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
When using SCE funds to upgrade the Title I
schoolwide program:
• The SCE program must still be implemented
• SCE expenditures must be tracked back to the
SCE PIC, and all generally accepted
accounting principles must be followed
• Use Program Intent Code (PIC) 30 only for SW
campuses at 40% using SCE funds to upgrade
schoolwide program
Refer to Module 9, Section 2.4.1 for additional guidance
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
When using SCE funds to upgrade the Title I
schoolwide program:
• SCE funds used to support the Title I, Part A
schoolwide educational program must be part
of the campus budget
• Campus Improvement Plan must follow State
and Federal guidelines and indicate the
coordination of SCE funds
• The district/charter maintains documentation
that all programs and strategies are supported
by scientifically based research
It is not sufficient to say, “some studies indicate _____.”
Refer to Module 9, Section 2.4.1 for additional guidance
Program
Intent Codes
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
24 - Accelerated Education
26 - Nondisciplinary Alternative Education Programs- AEP
Basic Services
Ensure all the attending students are identified “atrisk” using state criteria
Local criteria may be used adjacent to state criteria
28 - Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs DAEP Basic
Services
29 - Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs DAEP
Supplemental SCE Costs
A waiver required if LEA requires more funds to offer
additional supplemental services
30 - Title I Schoolwide Activities Related to SCE & Other
Costs on Campuses with 40% or More Low-Income
Poverty Percentage
Refer to Module 9, Section 9.3.1
Who can be served?
At-Risk - TEC 29.081
Title I Schoolwide
Program
The SCE program is defined  provides opportunities for
all students to meet the
in law as programs and/or
services designed to
State's proficient and
advanced levels of
supplement the regular
student academic
education program for
students identified as at risk
achievement.
of dropping out of school.
 meets the educational
needs of all children in the
The purpose of the program
is to increase the academic
school, particularly the
achievement and reduce
needs of children who are
the dropout rate of these
failing, or most at risk of
students.
failing, to meet the State’s
challenging student
academic performance
standards .
Commonality
Both programs
are designed to help
students served
to achieve proficiency on
challenging
State academic
achievement standards.
© 2011
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
If Funds Are Spent on Staff Development:
• Be able to demonstrate that school
personnel have received staff
development designed to assist students
at risk of dropping out of school
• Expenses MUST be reasonable and
necessary
• Training MUST be related and beneficial
to the at-risk program and on-going, not
“one time” event
Refer to TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide, version 14, Module 9, Sections 9.2.5 and 9.2.6
How Can SCE
Funds Be Expended?
Staff Development Documentation Needed to
ensure:
– Training was evaluated for effectiveness
– Each professional development activity was
related to the priority areas needed to
improve student achievement
– List of attendees indicates teachers
receiving training serve at-risk students
– Cost of professional development is
reasonable and necessary
Refer to TEA Financial Accountability System Resource Guide, version 14, Module 9, Sections 9.2.5 and 9.2.6
Can SCE Funds Pay For
Professional Development?
Sample Finding
FINDING - DISTRICT “C” DID NOT MAINTAIN ADEQUATE
SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION FOR TRAINING AND
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT EXPENDITURES THAT WERE
CODED TO THE SCE PROGRAM
Specifically, auditors noted that District C
funded the cost of CPR training, Vision
Screening Certification training, and Diabetes
Management training for school nurses with
SCE direct funds. District C could not attest
that the professional development was related
to the intent and purpose of the SCE program.
As a result, unallowable costs ($4,899) were
charged to grant funds
Can You Justify
Expenditures?
Always consider the following questions:
• Is the program, activity, or strategy reasonable and
necessary to carry out the intent and purpose of the
program?
• Does the program, activity, or strategy address a need
previously identified in the campus comprehensive
needs assessment?
• Was the program, activity, or strategy to be funded,
described in the DIP/CIPs or charter improvement plan
before the decision of whether to pay the expenditure
from SCE funds?
• How will the program, activity, or strategy be evaluated
to measure a positive impact on student achievement?
• Will the program, activity, or strategy raise academic
standards for the intended beneficiaries?
Can You Justify
Expenditures?
Important Notes:
• Note: Auditors always scrutinize the time of
expense. If it appears that large
purchases/expenses were made at the end of
the school year, it appears that the
district/campus did not carefully plan how
these funds were to be spent to benefit
students
• Just because it’s listed in the plan (even if it is
a schoolwide program) does not necessarily
make the activity allowable!
Can You Justify
Expenditures?
Documentation to Support Charges:
• DIP/CIP: The PRIMARY record supporting
expenditures
• Teacher Schedules: The PRIMARY record
supporting payroll expenditures
Can You Justify
Expenditures?
Documentation to Support Charges (Continued):
• Job Descriptions: Describes the roles and
responsibilities of staff in instructional and/or noninstructional areas
– Ensure all job descriptions:
• Are signed and updated
• Include Job Title, Salary, Statement of Purpose and
Objectives, Experience, and Skills
• Are updated annually or when a function or activity is
added to or deleted from an existing job description
• Clearly identify the function and activities performed by
the employee for the applicable fund source(s) or cost
objective
• Are maintained in the employee’s personnel file
• Time and Effort: The PRIMARY record to document
payroll for split-funded employees
Can the Following
Positions Be SCE
Funded?
1. Counselor
CAN (If it is a supplemental counselor hired to work with at-risk students)
2. School Psychologist
CANNOT
3. Superintendent, Principal, or Asst Principal
4. Attendance Clerk
5. GT Teacher
CANNOT
CANNOT
CANNOT
6. Parent Involvement/Community Liaison
CANNOT
7. Secretary/Clerk Assigned to an SCE-Funded
CAN (Portion assisting SCE employee)
Employee
8. Special Education/CTE Teachers
DEPENDS (If teacher is supplemental to serve at-risk students)
How Should SCE
Funds Be Budgeted?
Indirect Cost
(slide includes RECENT proposed change to indirect cost)
Indirect costs include expenditures reported under the
following expenditure function codes:
 34-Student Transportation
 41-General Administration
 81-Facilities Acquisition and Construction
 Function 90 series of the General Fund, as defined in the TEA
Financial Accountability System Resource Guide (FASRG)
No more than 15% 45% 48% of each school district's
Foundation School Program (FSP) special allotments
under the Texas Education Code, Chapter 42, Subchapter
C, may be expended for indirect costs related to the
compensatory education program
Refer to the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 105. Foundation School Program, Subchapter B
Use of State Funds and Module 9, Section 9.2.4.
5
© 2011
Indirect Cost
(slide includes RECENT proposed change to direct cost)
The 85% 55% 52% (for direct costs) of
the State Compensatory Education (SCE)
allotment must be spent on the district’s
identified students at risk of dropping
out of school
Refer to the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 105. Foundation School Program, Subchapter B
Use of State Funds and Module 9, Section 9.2.4.
© 2011
52% and Carry Over
•
•
•
•
Carry over amounts result when SCE expenditures during a
fiscal year are less than the 52% of the FSP SCE allotment for
the school year
Budget carry over amounts as soon as possible
In calculating carry over, earned allotment amount is compared
to the district’s expenditure amount for the respective
school/fiscal year
According to TAC §105.11, at least 52% of the school’s
compensatory
education allotment is to be spent on direct costs each year
•
- If a disproportionate amount of the allotment is received at the
end of the year, carry over amounts may result if expenditures are
less than 52% of the FSP SCE allotment for the school year. In this
instance, carry over amounts are to be budgeted in the first or
second subsequent fiscal year
Refer to Module 9, Section 9.3.1.6
© 2011
What Are the SCE
CIP/DIP
Requirements?
What Are the SCE
CIP/DIP Requirements?
The SCE Program Must Be Described In:
• The campus improvement plan if the
program is implemented at the campus
level
• The district improvement plan if the
state compensatory education program
is implemented districtwide
– The DIP reflects the summary of all SCE
programs
District/Campus Improvement Plans
The district/campus improvement plan must include the
following:
 Total amount of SCE funds allocated for resources and staff
 Actual dollar amounts for activities and SCE dollars that
show 52% of the entitlement
 Cumulative summary of program and entire budget in the
DIP
 Specific campus activities and campus budget in the CIPs
“Reliable information is a must for successful planning.” -C. Columbus
Refer to TEC, 11.253
© 2011
What Should Be
Included in the CIP
to Support the SCE
Program?
Sample Elementary
2011-2012
Campus Improvement Plan
Important to
show board
approval
Date of Board Approval: 9/21/2011
Statement
shows
schoolwide
flexibility
Funds Coordinated Title I on Schoolwide Campus
Show SCE
Campus
allocation
and FTEs
All Federal Funds will be coordinated with Title I Funds to implement the
Schoolwide Program. State Compensatory Funds will be used to upgrade
and enhance the schoolwide instructional program so that all students
can meet the state performance standards.
(SCE Funds:________________; FTEs:_____________)
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
Comprehensive Needs Assessment Process
The Campus Improvement Team met on June 1, 2011 and conducted the Comprehensive Needs Assessment. Each program area presented data and a
program evaluation summary. After each program presented their data and evaluation summary, the team broke into small groups and conducted data
analysis on campus trend data including demographic data, student performance data, and completion and graduation data. Each small group reported a
summary of the data analysis. Critical areas of concern were identified and discussed.
The CNA is a
vital piece of
proving needs
for SCE
Summary of Prior Year’s Program Evaluation
expenditures
An evaluation of the Campus Plan from 2010-2011 was performed and the findings were shared with the team. In looking
at the long term data from the past
six years, many areas in TAKS performance have increased greatly, including subgroups. It was also noted that the demographics of the campus have also
changed. The white population has decreased by 5.8% and the Hispanic population has increased by 5.4%. It was stated that the programs and methods that
we have been using are working and we need to continue those as well as addressing the need to increase the commended performance scores.
Data Analysis
Sources
This is NOT the
evaluation, but a
Summary of Findings
reference
to it

Hispanic math
scores lag behind
other subpopulations
TAKS Data
Sources:
Campus/Grade Level
TAKS Data

Some of the Hispanic students are repeat math failures from one year to the next
TAKS Objective
Program Data

Science scores are below the exemplary range
Ethnic Groups
Longitudinal/Cohort

Hispanic students are performing well below their white peers
Economically Disadvantaged
Data

Hispanic commended scores lag behind white students
LEP
Trend Data

ESL TAKS passage rate is lower than other student groups
G/T
At Risk
Migrant
Program Effectiveness
Multi-Hazard

Completed one-to-one laptop initiative for fifth grade
Special Education
Emergency

All classrooms have at least an LCD projector and interactive whiteboards
Gifted and Talented
Operations Plan

Installed and configured Apangea Math Program, and Ellis ESL software
ESL/Bilingual
Security Audit

Added 2 additional security camera systems to the academic area
Title I
Program Evaluations
Career and Technical Education TAKS Data
Migrant
Parental Involvement
State Compensatory Education
Recommended Initiatives and Strategies:
• Continue support to students not mastering TAKS objectives through tutorials and Response to Intervention in order to make the transition to STAAR
• Increase support to Hispanic, LEP, and economically disadvantaged students as these student populations are increasing
• Continue to use CSCOPE as a curriculum resource rather than a mandated curriculum
Proof that
the SCE
program was
reviewed
The basis for the
strategies used to
support
struggling
learners
Student Support Services
On a schoolwide
Goal
Student support services
will be
to meet the diverse needs of all student subgroups
On
a provided
schoolwide
Performance
1. 90% of all Hispanic students will pass the math, reading, and science STAAR
campus with 40%
campus
with
40%
Objectives
2. 90% of all economically
disadvantaged
students
will pass the math, reading & science STAAR
3. Obtain 98% or higher attendance rate
Eco. Dis., restate
Eco. Dis., restate
4. NCLB Indicator 2.2: The percentage of limited English proficient students who are at or above the proficient level in reading/language arts on the STAAR
will meet or exceed 90%the phrase from
the total funds
5. NCLB Indicator 2.3: The percentage of limited English proficient students who are at or above the proficient level in mathematics on the STAAR will meet
allocated and the
or exceed 90%
the cover
6. NCLB Indicator 5.2: The percentage of students who drop out of school-- disaggregated by race, ethnicity, gender, disability status, migrant status, English
total FTEs funded
proficiency, and economically disadvantaged status will be 0%
Summative
TAKS data disaggregated by each subgroup; attendance data; dropout data
with SCE $
Evaluation
Activity
State Compensatory
Education: SCE
Funds will be used to
upgrade and enhance
the schoolwide
instructional
program so that all
students can meet
the state
performance
standards
Person(s)
Responsible
Principal
Closely monitor
LPAC Committee
exited E.S.L. students
and provide support
services as needed
This specific
activity would be
an example of
Provide accelerated
Principals
instructionsomething
for any
students failing/in
by SCE
dangerfunded
of failing
Resources
Completion Date
SCE Funds:________ May, 2012
FTEs: ________
On a campus with
targeted services,
this phrase would
not beJanuary, 2012
ESL
May, 2012
appropriate
Progress Reports
Report Cards
Benchmarks
Evidence of Impact
Benchmark
Title I Schoolwide
Timelines
Components
Increased performance of Each three weeks
targeted students
Monthly
Each six weeks
May 2012
On a targeted
campus, funds
and FTEs are
broken down and
Any exited ESL student
Each three weeks
whoallocated
shows lack of by Each six weeks
continued success will be January 2012
activity
provided support services March 2012
AMI
as needed
General Budget
May, 2012
STAAR
Utilize STAAR
Principals
remediation
computer software
for targeted students
Evidence of
Implementation
Progress Reports
Lesson Plans
Report Cards
TAKS Test
General Budget
May, 2012
Progress Reports
Accelerated
Instruction Rosters
Report Cards
Students failing or in
danger of failing STAAR
will be successful on
subsequent STAAR
administrations
Each three weeks AMI, TIA
Each six weeks
Each six weeks
On a schoolwide campus, “general budget”
might be appropriate for this compensatory
Benchmarks
Students utilizing
January 2012
AMI
activity. On a campus
services,
remediationwith
softwaretargeted
will March 2012
demonstrate increased
this would
haveonto be specific
performance
benchmarks
How Does a District
Include SCE in the
District Plan?
Sample ISD
2011-2012
If some SCE funds
District
Improvement
Plan
are expended at the
If SCE funds are targeted on
district level, this
some campuses, but
Date of Board Approval: 9/21/2011
needs to be reflected
schoolwide on others,
in the statement
amend this statement to
reflect services/allocations
Statement shows
schoolwide
flexibility on ALL
campuses
Funds Coordinated on Title I Schoolwide Campuses
All campuses are Title I, schoolwide with at least 40% economically disadvantaged. All
Federal Funds will be coordinated with Title I Funds to implement the Schoolwide
Program on each campus. State Compensatory Funds will be used to upgrade and
enhance the schoolwide instructional programs on all campuses so that all students
can meet the state performance standards.
Campus A: SCE Funds:________________; FTEs:_____________
Campus B: SCE Funds:________________; FTEs:_____________
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
Comprehensive Needs Assessment Process
The District Improvement Team met on June 1, 2011 and conducted the Comprehensive Needs Assessment. Each program area presented data and a program
evaluation summary. After each program presented their data and evaluation summary, the team broke into small groups and conducted data analysis on
campus trend data including demographic data, student performance data, and completion and graduation data. Each small group reported a summary of the
data analysis. Critical areas of concern were identified and discussed.
Summary of Prior Year’s Program Evaluation
An evaluation of the District Plan from 2010-2011 was performed and the findings were shared with the team. In looking at the long term data from the past
six years, many areas in TAKS performance have increased greatly, including subgroups. It was also noted that the demographics of the campus have also
changed. The white population has decreased by 5.8% and the Hispanic population has increased by 5.4%. It was stated that the programs and methods that
we have been using are working and we need to continue those as well as addressing the need to increase the commended performance scores.
Data Analysis
Summary
of Findings
CNA
process
is basically the
Sources:

Hispanic math scores lag behind other subpopulations
same
as the campus
TAKS Data

Some of the Hispanic students are repeat math failures from one year to the next
Program Data

Science scores are below
the exemplary
process…includes
analysis
of range
Longitudinal/Cohort

Hispanic students are performing well below their white peers
across
the scores
district
Data
areas
Hispanic
commended
lag behind white students
Sources
TAKS Data
Campus/Grade Level
TAKS Objective
Ethnic Groups
Economically Disadvantaged
LEP
Trend Data

ESL TAKS passage rate is lower than other student groups
G/T
At Risk
Migrant
Program Effectiveness
Multi-Hazard

Completed one-to-one laptop initiative for fifth grade
Special Education
Emergency

All classrooms have at least an LCD projector and interactive whiteboards
Gifted and Talented
Operations Plan

Installed and configured Apangea Math Program, and Ellis ESL software
ESL/Bilingual
Security Audit

Added 2 additional security camera systems to the academic area
Title I
Program Evaluations
Career and Technical Education TAKS Data
Migrant
Parental Involvement
State Compensatory Education
Recommended Initiatives and Strategies:
• Continue support to students not mastering TAKS objectives through tutorials and Response to Intervention in order to make the transition to STAAR
• Increase support to Hispanic, LEP, and economically disadvantaged students as these student populations are increasing
• Continue to use CSCOPE as a curriculum resource rather than a mandated curriculum
Student Support Services
Goal
Student support services will be provided to meet the diverse needs of all student subgroups
In a district with all
Performance
1. 90% of all Hispanic students will pass the math, reading, and science STAAR
Objectives
2. 90% of all economically disadvantaged
students will pass the math, reading & science STAAR
schoolwide
Restate the total
3. Obtain 98% or higher attendance rate
40%proficient students who
4. NCLB Indicator 2.2: campuses
The percentage of with
limited English
are at or
above the proficient
funds
allocated
andlevel in reading/language arts on the STAAR
will meet or exceed 90%
Eco.
Dis.,
restate
5. NCLB Indicator 2.3: The
percentage
of limited
English proficient studentsthe
who are
at or above
the proficient
level in mathematics on the STAAR will meet
total
FTEs
funded
or exceed 90%
the phrase from
with bySCE
by gender, disability status, migrant status, English
6. NCLB Indicator 5.2: The percentage of students who drop out of school-- disaggregated
race, $
ethnicity,
proficiency, and economically disadvantaged
status
will
be
0%
the cover
campus
Summative
Evaluation
Activity
TAKS data disaggregated by each subgroup; attendance data; dropout data
State Compensatory
Education: SCE
Funds will be used to
upgrade and enhance
the schoolwide
instructional
program so that all
students can meet
the state
performance
standards
Person(s)
Responsible
Principal
Completion Date
Campus A:
SCE Funds: _______
FTEs: __________
May, 2012
On a campus with
targeted services,
this phrase would
not be
appropriate
Evidence of
Implementation
Progress Reports
Lesson Plans
Report Cards
TAKS Test
Campus B:
SCE Funds: _______
FTEs: __________
s: ________
This specific activity
would be an
Closely
monitor
Committee
example
of LPAC
campus
exited E.S.L. students
allocations
for
and provide
support
services as needed
targeted programs
SCE services will be
targeted at each
campus to assist atrisk students in
meeting state
performance
standards
Resources
Principals
ESL
January, 2012
May, 2012
Campus A:
SCE Funds: _______
FTEs: __________
May, 2012
Campus B:
SCE Funds: _______
FTEs: __________
Evidence of Impact
Benchmark
Title I Schoolwide
If any
funds are
Timelines
Components
Increased performanceexpended
of Each three weeks
at the
targeted students
Monthly
district
level
Each six
weeks for ANY
May 2012
reason (professional
development, DAEP,
etc.), break this out
as a separate activity
In a districtAnywith
exited ESL student
who shows lack of
targeted
continued success will be
support services
campuses,provided
asfunds
needed
and FTEsStudents
are utilizing
Benchmarks
remediation
broken down
and software will
demonstrate increased
allocated
by on
performance
benchmarks
campus
Progress Reports
Report Cards
Benchmarks
Each three weeks AMI
Each six weeks
January 2012
March 2012
January 2012
March 2012
AMI
Who Has to Submit
Plans for SCE
Review and
When/How?
Who Has to Submit DIPs
and CIPs?
• Districts must electronically submit
improvement plans IF the District
Planning Estimate (DPE) or Legislative
Planning Estimate (LPE) column on the
Summary of Finances was $500,000 or
more for the PREVIOUS fiscal year
• Plans must include all TEC requirements
How Does a District
Submit DIPs and CIPs?
The following plans must be electronically
submitted through TEASE Audit account:
• District Improvement Plan
• Two Campus Improvement Plans for campuses that
had the highest percentages of students at-risk of
dropping out of school
– Of the two campus plans submitted, at least one CIP is
to be submitted for a non-Title I schoolwide campus (if
any) that had the highest percentage of students at-risk
– CIPs must also be submitted electronically for ALL
campuses that received low-performing academic
accountability ratings for the previous school year (It is
possible for districts to file more than two campus
plans)
How Does a District
Submit Evaluations?
The local evaluation of SCE strategies,
activities, and programs is REQUIRED for
a district that:
• Had ANY low-performing campuses
or
• Reported more than 59% at-risk students for
the previous school year
When Are Documents
Due to TEA?
All required documents are to be
submitted not later than the 150th day
after the last day permissible to send data
for the PEIMS data FINAL Midyear
resubmission two…
Typically late July (Often the last week)
How Do Districts
Submit?
1. Ensure you have TEASE Audit access
2. Save all plans in PDF
3. Name all files using naming conventions
outlined in the Electronic Report
Submission Standards (see “naming” slide
or go to website below)
http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index4.aspx?id=3968
4. Upload Plans to TEASE Audit site (see
next slide)
Submission instructions are outlined in the Electronic
Reports Submission Standards
http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index4.aspx?id=3968
Use this box to enter each campus plan one at a time.
14
©
What Does an SCE
Evaluation Include?
What Should the
Evaluation Include?
The program’s evaluation measures how
successful the at-risk program has been
in addressing identified needs, and
meeting the goals of the plan
• Answers the question, “How do we know
if the SCE program is Making progress
and achieving results?”
• The SCE Program Evaluation is NOT
– A list of TAKS results attached to the plan
– A survey without analysis of results
See sample evaluation
What Are Some
Common Audit
Findings?
What Are Some Common
Audit Findings?
• At-risk students incorrectly identified
• Incorrect use or lack of documentation
of the direct 52% portion of SCE funds
• No evidence of an actual (not a wish
list) comprehensive needs assessment
• SCE expenditures are not linked to the
plan(s)
What Are Some Common
Audit Findings?
• Strategies not identified for at-risk
program or at-risk students
• No evaluation of the SCE program
• SCE strategies listed unrelated to
supplementing the basic educational
program
• Incorrect coding
What Are Some Common
Audit Findings?
• SCE-funded supplemental staff not
identified
• Lack of supporting documentation in the
CIPs/DIPs
• Same plan submitted year after year Plans MUST reflect one school year
because plans must be updated on a
yearly basis
The campus improvement plan is not the same as a
“continuous” improvement plan, which will not be accepted
What Are Some Common
Audit Findings?
• Funding state mandated rules, programs or
positions (this is unallowable) instead of
supplementing the basic program
• Funds not used to meet intent and purpose
of SCE program
• SCE funds used for questionable travel
expenses and/or field trips
• SCE funds used for entertainment costs,
door prizes, banquets, trophies, meals,
athletics, UIL, and school board expenses
What Are Some Common
Audit Findings?
• SCE funds used for positions that are
NOT related to direct instruction
• Purchase orders lacking significant
documentation
• SCE strategies and funds used for
unsupported high dollar equipment,
maintenance, or basic supplies
• No indication of an at-risk program
Thorough Documentation is Essential!
Do you know where your district maintains
this required information?
 State at-risk criteria
 Local criteria and information regarding 10 percent cap
 Entrance and exit policies
 Calculation of the 110 percent satisfactory performance
on all assessment instruments
 District and campus needs assessment
 District and campus improvement plans
Chinese Proverb - The palest ink is better than the best memory.
© 2011
What Questions Do
You Have?
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