Data! Data! Data!
Find, Understand and Use Data to
Develop Comprehensive School
Counseling Programs
2013-14 Fall RESA Training for School Counselors
Linda H. Brannan
NCDPI Consultant
K-12 Student Support Services
[email protected]
School Counseling Wikispace
http://schoolcounseling.ncdpi.wikispaces.net
• Click Professional Development
• Click 2013-14 Professional Development Sessions
• Click Regional Fall RESA Trainings
Presenters
• Linda Brannan, NCDPI Educational Consultant - K-12 Student Support
Services
• Debora Williams, NCDPI Educational Consultant for Special Projects
• Amy Jablonski, NCDPI Educational Consultant for RtI
• Anne Nixon, NCDPI Educational Consultant for RtI
• Heather Reynolds, NCDPI Educational Consultant for PBIS
• Other Presenters across NC from RtI and PBIS
Training Purpose – Train the trainer
1. To understand how to develop a comprehensive
school counseling program that meets the needs
of all students using data-driven decisions
2. To move beyond simple collection of data to using
the collected data to solve problems
3. To understand the tools within the NC Framework
for School Counseling (ASCA National Model)
4. To understand the job description and the new
School Counselor Evaluation
Now…. 21st Century School
Counselor
Leadership
Advocacy
Collaboration
“Implement a data driven, comprehensive,
developmental school counseling program to
promote systemic change to increase college and
career readiness for all students.”
New Question
for School Counselors
• How are students different as a result of
the School Counseling Program?
School Counselor Job Description
• Purpose – utilize leadership, advocacy and
collaboration to promote student success,
provide preventive services, and respond to
student needs
• Role – develop and deliver a comprehensive
school counseling program that addresses
academic, career and personal/social
development for all students
Major Functions
Duties & Responsibilities
• Development & Management of comprehensive program to
support academic success
• Delivery of Comprehensive Services
• NC Guidance Essential Standards/Curriculum
• Individual Student Planning
• Preventive & Responsive Services
• System Support
• Accountability/Growth
School Counselor
Job Description
Think Time
• Review the Job Description
• Jot down a few “aha’s”
• Share with a colleague
School Counselor
Job Description
• New legislation reinforces job description
• 80% of work time in direct support services to
students
• 20% in program support/management including
“fair share” duties
• local LEAs will develop a plan to transition test
coordinator duties from school counselors
New Legislation: G.S. §115C-316.1
“Duties of School Counselors”
• http://www.ncleg.net/Sessions/2013/Bills/Se
nate/PDF/S402v7.pdf
• “SC shall implement a comprehensive
developmental school counseling program
in their schools. Counselors shall spend at
least 80% of work time in direct student
services…”
New School Counselor Evaluation
(based on 2008 NC Professional Standards for SC)
Standard 1 – School counselors demonstrate leadership,
advocacy, and collaboration.
Standard 2 – School counselors promote a respectful
environment for a diverse population of students.
Standard 3 – School counselors understand and facilitate the
implementation of a comprehensive school
counseling program.
Standard 4 – School counselors promote learning for all students
Standard 5 – School counselors actively reflect on their practice.
No Standard 6 or 8
Framework for NC School Counseling
Continuum of Understanding
Where are you with ASCA National Model?
• I’ve heard or read about it (Developing)
• I’ve implemented some things (Developing-toProficient)
• I’ve implemented a lot and share with other
counselors in my school/district (Accomplished)
• I have a comprehensive, national model program
that I can teach to others (Distinguished)
Framework for NC School Counseling
The New Book – 3rd Edition
• Online tools:
• www.ASCANationalModel.org/register
• Input Serial Number and download zipfile of
tools for FREE!
What is one thing in each of
the four sections that you find
useful.
Foundation
• Beliefs, Vision, Mission
• Program Focus/Goals:
Academics/Behavior/Career SMART Goals
Worksheet
• Student Competencies: National Standards, NC
Essential Standards: Skills students should know
and be able to do.
• Professional Competencies: NC Professional
SC Standards and School Counselor Evaluation
Beliefs & Vision and Mission
• Use the examples!
(Pages 22-24)
• Align with your district and school
• What is your school’s mission statement?
_____________School District Mission Statement
_____________Elementary/MS/HS School
_____________School Counseling Program
Program Focus/Goals
•
Start with your School Improvement Plan
•
Effective S.M.A.R.T. Goals:
•
•
Promote achievement, attendance, behavior, and/or school
safety
•
Are based on school data
•
Address school-wide data, policies and practices or address
closing-the-gap issues
•
Address student competencies
See “goal setting: the process” page 25
Program Goals (continued)
Comprehensive
School Counseling Plan & Agreement
Framework for NC School Counseling
Management
Assessment and Tools:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Annual Agreement
Advisory Council
Action Plans
Lesson Plans
Calendars
Online Tools: Competencies Assessment, Use of Time
Assessment, Program Assessment, Annual Agreement,
Action Plans, etc.
Annual Agreement and
Advisory Council
• NC Annual Agreement:
• a tool to use with administrator/evaluator to
develop/refine the SC Program for the current year –
use D3M
• Table Groups: Discuss how you may use this tool to
communicate your program goals and meet criteria of SC
Evaluation
• Advisory Council:
• Group of stakeholders to INFORM your program
• This is your moment to SHINE ☺
Annual Agreement
Example from a School District:Comprehensive
School Counseling Plan & Agreement
Data & Action Plans
• School Data Profile (p.66-67) reviews all sources
of data from your school – focus areas Academic,
Attendance, Behavior
• Three types of action plans from D3M:
• Small Group – specific need(s) of a few
• Curriculum – all students - Guidance Essential
Standards
• Closing-the Gap – aligns with SIP - a “must-have” in
your plan
Data, Data, Data
• Three types of data collected from
Action Plans:
• Process (what happened – what you did for
whom)
• Perception (what knowledge/skill/behavior was
learned)
• Outcome (how were students different)
Small Group
• The power of setting goals for your groups.
At your table groups:
• Pick one type small group or that you run and
talk about the three types of data.
Curriculum Plan
• Do you know what lessons you will be teaching at
the beginning of the year?
• Do you plan a scope of learning for your program?
• Use the curriculum plan to answer YES!
At your table groups:
• Pick ONE grade level and talk about how you could
collect process, perception, and outcome data over the
course of the year.
Closing the Gap
• These plans should be D3M that supports
your Program Goals in Foundation section.
• At your table groups
• Pick ONE CTG Goal and the types of data you
could collect.
Calendars
• How detailed are your calendars?
• Can you see how you spend your time?
• Weekly vs. Monthly calendars (public vs.
private)
Share how you keep a calendar and how
accountable it holds you.
Framework for NC School Counseling
Delivery
•
•
80% of time working with or for students
Direct (with students)
•
•
•
Core Curriculum (NC Guidance Essential Standards)
Individual Student Planning
•
Responsive Services
Indirect (for students)
Framework for NC School Counseling
Accountability
•
•
•
Review your Action Plans and Program Goals:
•
•
Data Analysis: Online Tools: Curriculum Results Analysis, School
Data Profile Analysis, Use of Time Analysis
Program Results: Action Plan and Program Goal Results Reports
Evaluation and Improvement – Continuous Improvement (Growth)
Where should we go from here?
• Make a Plan
• Set dates that each part will be completed
• Coach & encourage yourself and your team
• Additional Resources:
• http://schoolcounseling.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/
• http://www.livebinders.com/play/play_or_edit?id=39851
4
Types of Data
Assessment Tool Choice
Measurement of student growth; assessment
tool choice is dependent on the purpose and
use of measurement results- RtI Action
Network
Assessment
Prior achievement is a predictor of
outcomes –
“our job as teachers/educators is to mess
this up, by planning ways in which to
accelerate the growth of those that start
behind….so before the lesson is planned,
the teacher must know what students
already know and can do”
Hattie (2012). Visible Learning for Teachers
Types of Data from ASCA
Process
Perception
What happened?
What you did and for
whom?
What was learned?
Ex: Number of
students you work with
during the year.
Ex: What did the
students learn as a
result of the work you
did?
Outcome
How was a student
different as a result of
the work?
Ex: How does this
impact the larger data
sets (academics,
behavior,
attendance)?
Connecting the Data Sources
Process
Perception
Outcome
Surveyed 300
students in 8th grade
about bullying in the
school
Survey following antibullying lessons
regarding changes in
bullying behavior
Measure impact on
Office Discipline
Referrals (ODR) in the
area of bullying
Connecting the Data Sources
Process
Perception
Outcome
Made contact with the
identified 100 students
in grades 9-12 who
had 7 more absences
last year than the
district allows.
Tracked attendance
data in Home Base on
a monthly basis to see
progress in
attendance.
Measure
School Improvement
reduction of
absences
Plan (SIP)
at goal
the end
is toof
reduce
the semester.
number of
Compare
absences
to by
last50%.
year’s
data.
Connecting the Data Sources
Process
Perception
Outcome
Identify common
reasons
Identify current
(ex: 90%
teen
of
last year’s
parents:
dropouts
30
were
students
teen parents).
in grades
9-12.
Give
Give
Monitor
survey
survey
to
class
30
after
teen
strategies/supports
parents
attendance
to identify
and are
barriers
reasons
given to
to
for
determine
completing
absences
(ex:
reduction
child
school.
care
of barriers
issues).
.
School Improvement
Plan (SIP) goal is to
reduce number
Number
of teen
students
dropping
out
parents dropping out.
(ex: 40 students).
Attendance data
Types of Data
Number of students you are working with
throughout the year in various groups and
settings – Classroom Guidance/Small
Groups/Closing the Gap Goals
Individual Think Time
• How do you track this?
• What method do you utilize to identify students to work
with?
• Write this on a sticky note.
Types of Data
Data collected to measure how student learning
or behavior has changed as a result of the
implemented strategies
Individual Think Time
• How do you determine this?
• What tools do you utilize to capture what was
learned?
• Write this on a sticky note.
Types of Data
Data collected to show the impact of your work with the
students in connection to the SIP such as with the
Closing the Gap Goals
(ex: academic, attendance, behavior – reflects at end of
year in your Outcome/Results Reports)
Individual Think Time
• What tools do you utilize to capture what was learned?
• How do you link it back to the School Improvement Plan?
• Write this on a sticky note.
Networking
•
• Find someone in the room from another
school district
• Introduce yourselves and discuss process,
perception, and outcome sticky notes and the
connections between the three types of data
Accountability - Data Sources &
UsageWhat do you do now?
Activity
• Utilize the blank data worksheet to list the
data sources you utilize.
• Think about additional data sources you can
use
Types of Data
Graduation Rate = 82.5%
http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/08/08/3092325/nc-graduation-rate-rises-above.html
DROPOUT PREVENTION
EARLY WARNING REPORTS
School Counseling/Guidance
Fall Regional RESA Trainings
Presenters: Debora Williams and Betsy Baugess
Do You Know?
Annual Number of
Dropouts in U.S.
High School Dropout Statistics
Annual number of high school
dropouts in U.S.
3,000,000+
Do You Know?
Number of dropouts in
North Carolina (2012)
High School Dropout Statistics
Number of students dropping out of
school in North Carolina (2012)
13,488
Grades 9-12
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/research/discipline/re
ports/consolidated/2011-12/consolidated-report.pdf
Do You Know?
Number of NC students
rd
retained in 3 Grade
(2012)
Do You Know?
32,000
(2012)
PURPOSE
To facilitate an early warning system with research-based
risk factors for identifying students who may be at risk of
dropping out of school.
RESEARCH ONEARLY WARNING
INDICATORS
On-track Credits
An on-track student has accumulated the requisite number of credits to move to the next grade level
and no more than one semester “F” in a core subject. (Allensworth, 2009)
Attendance
Eight times more predictive of failure than prior test scores. A student who has more than 5 absences
in one semester of the 9th grade year has a 63% chance of graduating in four years. (Allensworth,
2009) In North Carolina, attendance issues were the most often noted for a reported dropout,
accounting for 41.5% of all dropouts.
GPA
Students with a “B” (3.0) average or higher in the first year have better than a 93% chance of
graduating; students with a D+/C- (1.0-2.5 GPA) average have a 53-92% chance of graduating;
students with less than a “D” average (1.0) have less than a 6% chance of graduating. (Allensworth,
2009)
RELEVANT SIS DATA
•
• Attendance data, both current and historical
• State assessment achievement level data
• Final marks for all middle school/high school courses
• Most recently calculated GPA (calculated at year-end for
grades 9-12)
PowerSchool
At Risk Report
The At Risk Report provides a listing of courses, sections,
and grades associated with students who are currently a
risk of failing for the current term.
PowerSchool
At Risk Report
Allows administrators and teachers to take a proactive
approach to address potential issues and ensure student
accountability.
At Risk Report Fields
•
• Attendance Mode
•
Daily
• Meeting
• Time
• Students to Include
• Selected students only
• All students
At Risk Report FieldsAttendance Codes
• ALL CODES
• Local School Bd Policy
• Illness or Injury
• Child Care
• Medical/Dental Appt
• Excused Tardy
• Death in Family
• Medically Fragile
• Quarantine
• Deployment Activity
• Court/Admin Proc
• Unexcused Absence
• Religious Observance
• Unex No Immunization
• Educational Opportunity
• Unexcused Tardy
• Teacher-in-Treatment
• Suspensions
Attendance Codes
At Risk Report Fields
• Reporting Segment or Begin Date and Ending Date
•
Reporting Segment
• Chose from reporting segment from the pop-up menu
•
Begin Date and Ending Date
• Specify a date range in using mm/dd/yyyy OR mm-dd-yyy
• Failure to use this format issues an alert
• Date must fall within the selected school year
At Risk Report – Data to be Filled
? Use Attendance Report Query
•
Enter minimum number of occurrences of selected attendance
codes
? Use Grades Report Query
•
Uses three Grade fields to query students for the report
• Select final grade type (Stored or Current)
• Minimum number of classes with failing grades
? Use Discipline Report Query
•
Discipline/incident check inn PowerSchool does NOT consider the
PowerSchool discipline/incident functionality that NC will be using.
This section should not be used at this time.
\
At Risk Report
NCWISE REPORTS
• Reporting Hub
Accessible to NC WISE School Data Managers, the LEA
Coordinators, Principals, and Others
• Four reports available on NCWISE Reporting Hub
• 9th Grade Dropout Early Warning Report
• 10th Grade Dropout Early Warning Report
• 11th Grade Dropout Early Warning Report
• 12th Grade Dropout Early Warning Report
• Most data is collected once after Year-End-Transition
NCWISE REPORTS(continued)
• Reports are designed for availability just prior to the start
of school allowing counselors to identify the “at risk”
students.
• Reports analyze the student’s historical data.
GR Risk Indicators
• Attendance through middle/high school
• Final course marks in key elementary/middle school
courses
• Successful completion of high school courses essential to
graduation within an appropriate timeframe, as indicated
by state assessments
• Cumulative credits earned in each high school year
• Continuous cumulative grade point average
Report Organization
Four available reports
• A ninth grade report, to be run at the start of ninth
grade, analyzes the previous 3 years
• A tenth grade report, to be run at the start of tenth
grade, considering ninth grade data
• An eleventh grade report, to be run at the start of
eleventh grade, considering tenth grade data
• An twelfth grade report, to be run at the start of twelfth
grade, considering eleventh grade data
Risk Criteria
Ninth grade report
• Final grade for standard required Math course (grades
6,7,8) < C
• Final grade for standard required English course
(grades 6,7,8) < C
All reports
• Total daily absences, in any one school year, exceed 5
daily absences
Tenth/Eleventh/Twelfth Grade
Risk Criteria
•
•GPA < 2.0
• Achievement Level of I or II for EOCs
• English I
• Algebra I
• Failure to achieve an expected level of course credits
after each year in high school
•
At beginning of grade 10, less than 5 earned credits
• At beginning of grade 11, less than 10 earned credits
• At beginning of grade 12, less than 15 earned credits
Report Details
•
• All reports are school level reports
•
Each report only contains students “at risk” for dropout
•
Each student has only one record in the report
•
Each column of the report represents a potential dropout risk
factor
Report Details (continued)
•
• If there is no data for a particular risk factor, the column
for that factor indicates “no data”
• Risk factor is calculated using only the available data
points
• There is no variable weighting factor. All risk factors
carry the same weight.
• Risk factor must be .25% or above for the student to be
included in the report
Ninth Grade Sample Report
SCHOOL
NAME
PUPIL 9th
#
Grade
Entry
Date
BIRTH_
DATE
STUDENT
Name
SIXth
_Grd
ABS
SEVN
Grd
ABS
EIGHT
Grd
ABS
SIXth
Grd
ENGL
SEVN
Grd
ENGL
EIGHT
Grd
ENGL
SIXth
Grd
MATH
SEVN
Grd
MATH
EIGHT
Grd
MATH
RISK
NC WISE HS
1
7/1/2010
6/30/1995
Student1
2
8
5
C+
D
F
D-
F
D
0.67
NC WISE HS
2
7/1/2011
7/12/1996
Student2
14
3
28
no data
C
F
80
C
D-
0.5
NC WISE HS
3
7/1/2011
9/20/1996
Student3
16
6
0
no data
B
A-
no data
B-
A-
0.29
NC WISE HS
4
7/1/2010
8/29/1993
Student4
no data
6
18
no data no data
F
no data
P
F
0.8
NC WISE HS
5
7/1/2010
4/10/1995
Student5
9
24
no data
D
NC WISE HS
6
7/1/2010
8/18/1995
Student6
3
5
5
C+
D
F
C
F
D
0.44
NC WISE HS
7
7/1/2011
3/20/1996
Student7
1
4
13
A
C-
B-
A
C-
C
0.33
NC WISE HS
8
7/1/2010
2/20/1995
Student8
5
9
13
C-
B-
F
C+
B-
D
0.56
NC WISE HS
9
7/1/2011
8/23/1996
Student9
7
6
6
A
C
D
C
C
C
0.44
NC WISE HS
10
7/1/2011
2/18/1996
Student10 no data
9
7
no data
94
92
no data
94
92
0.33
no data no data
F
no data no data
1
Example: Student #1
• Rising ninth grader
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2 absences in sixth grade
8 absences in seventh grade - risk factor
5 absences in eighth grade
Sixth grade English final mark is “C+”
Seventh grade English final mark is “D” - risk factor
Eighth grade English final mark is “F” - risk factor
Sixth grade math final mark is “D-” – risk factor
Seventh grade math final mark is “F” – risk factor
Eighth grade math final mark is “D” – risk factor
• RISK FACTOR is 67% (6 of 9 factors qualify as
risks)
Twelfth Grade Sample Report
http://dpi.state.nc.us/docs/graduate/resi
liency/sample-report.pdf
Contacts
• Debora Williams, Special Assistant
Graduation Initiatives
(919) 807-3912
[email protected]
• Betsy Baugess, Manager
Data/Software & Reporting
(919) 807-3276
[email protected]
Data-Based Decision Making
Using the TIPS model
Desired Outcomes
The goal of this training is to help schools move
beyond simple collection of data to using the
collected data to solve problems.
Rationale
Data should be used regularly to solve problems,
because it…
• provides a more objective viewpoint of the current state.
• increases efficiency by making needed action items clear.
• provides information about effectiveness of practices so
modifications can be made in a timely manner.
• ensures that strategies and interventions are based on
precise problem statements.
Data-Based Decision
Making
Problem-Solving Process
Problem-Solving Process:
Definitions
Problem: Difference exists between
expected/desired student behavior and current
student behavior.
Problem identification: Difference is discovered
and significance is determined.
Problem-solving: A plan is created to reduce or
eliminate difference.
Data-Based Decision
Making
Meeting Foundations
Meeting Foundations: Elements
• Team purpose
• Defined agreements about processes
• Established roles and responsibilities
• Electronic meeting minutes
Meeting Foundations: Overview
1. Meeting starts and ends on time
2. Consistent attendance by team members
3. Agenda is used to guide meeting topics
4. Process is in place to monitor progress of
implemented solutions
(review previous meeting minutes)
5. System is used for documenting decisions
6. Next Meeting is scheduled
Meeting Foundations: Overview
7. Team members prepare for and meet
responsibilities during meeting
8. All team members (absent or present) are given
minutes within 24 hours of the meeting
9. Decision makers are present when needed
10.Protocol is established for when administrator is
unable to attend
11.Efforts are making a difference in the lives of
children/students
Meeting Foundations: Team Purpose
District
District implementation
District-wide problem-solving
Provide support to schools
School
School implementation
School-wide problem-solving
Provide support to staff
Grade/
Department
Grade/Department (PLC?)
problem-solving
Individual
Student
Individual student problem-solving
Meeting Foundations:
Defined Processes
• Meeting dates/times
• Storage of information
• Contact information
• Ground rules/agreements/norms
1. Inform facilitator of attendance issues
before meeting
2. Avoid side talk
3. Remind each other to stay focused
4. Start and end on time
5. Be an active participant
Meeting Foundations: Roles
•
• Core roles
• Facilitator
• Backup for each role
• Minutes taker
• RtI Coach
• Data analyst
• PBIS team member
• Time keeper
• Administrator
• Active team members
Can one person
serve multiple
roles?
Are team
members
culturally
responsive?
Are there other roles
needed?
EX: communication
coordinator,
timekeeper
Are all skill sets
for problem
solving
present or easily
accessible?
Meeting Foundations: Minutes
(Documentation)
Logistics
• date
• time
• location
• roles
Agenda
•today’s items
•next week’s items
•Discussion items, decisions made, tasks and timelines
assigned
•Problem statements, solutions/decisions/tasks, responsible
people, timelines assigned, and an evaluation plan
Meeting Foundations: Minutes
(Review)
Meeting minutes
• An effective process check
• Baseline for current
meeting
Visual tracking of focus
topics during and after
meetings
• Prevents side
conversations
• Prevents repetition
• Encourages completion
of tasks
Meeting Foundations: Environment
Problemsolving is to
A key to collective problem
provide a visual context that allows everyone
to follow and contribute.
Use
Data
Consider using one form to guide the
activities of the meeting and using a projector
so that all team members view the content
and
Out participate.
of
Time
Solution
Meeting Foundations: Structure/Flow
1. Attendance, roles for meeting
2. Next meeting date
3. Review agenda for meeting
4. Review/status update of previous meeting minutes
5. Review data and use problem solving model to prompt
the development of a comprehension action plan
6. Reports needed for next meeting
7. Team assessment of meeting
8. Dissemination of meeting minutes
Data-Based Decision
Making
Identify Problems
Identify Problem(s)
• Behavioral/academic definition
• Concrete, observable and measurable
• Stranger test?
• Typically begins broad
Data-Based Decision
Baking
Develop Hypothesis
Develop and Test Hypothesis:
Determine Cause of Problem
• Determining the cause, or uncovering why a
problem is occurring, is essential to developing
interventions.
• The goal is to help students be successful.
• When collecting data, it is important for staff to
make their best, most informed guesses about
why students are struggling.
Develop and Test Hypothesis: ICEL
• We must ask questions to form a hypothesis
regarding “What is the problem? Why is it
occurring?”
• We ask questions across four domains.
Instruction
Curriculum
Environment
Domains within our control
Learner
Develop and Test Hypothesis
Instruction
Curriculum
Environment
Learner
Review
Review
Review
Review
Intervie
w
Intervie
w
Intervie
w
Intervie
w
Observe
Observe
Observe
Observe
Test
Test
Test
Test
Develop and Test Hypothesis
Review
Interview
Observe
Test
Curricular
materials
Previous
Teachers
Teacher’s
instructional
strategies
Group
Diagnostic
Test
Curriculum
Maps
Current
Teachers
Instructional
Time
Individual
Testing data
Etc. . .
Skill specific
test on sample
of students
Etc…
Etc. . .
Etc. . .
Examples to Consider
Develop and Test Hypothesis:
Things to Consider
• A hypothesis is an explanation for what the data
and your experience tell you.
• Use multiple sources of data.
• Staff with the most direct experience with the
problem need to add their insight to accurately
define cause.
• An accurate hypothesis is crucial to designing
solutions that will be effective.
Develop and Test Hypothesis
ACCURATEL
Y DEFINED
PROBLEM
ACCURATE
HYPOTHESIS
PRECISE
PROBLEM
STATEMENT
Activity: Identifying Precise Problem
Statement
Which partial statement is more precise?
Which statement is a complete Precise
Problem
Statement?
Too
many ODRs
15 instances of disrespect
Too many ODRs in the afternoon
24 ODRs between 1:00 and 1:30
Too many ODRs outside the classroom 6 ODRs on the playground
25% of students have at least 2 ODRs
Too many ODRs on the
playground
Many students have ODRs
Total of 12 ODRs for aggression on the
playground in the last month; this number is
more than last year and shows an increasing
trend for this year; these incidents are
occurring during the first recess, and there are
different students involved each time. The
curriculum and instruction used to teach
playground expectations do not address
alternatives to aggression.
Data-Based Decision
Making
Discuss and Select Solutions
Discuss and Select Solutions
• Solution should be based on the precise problem
statement which is developed around instruction,
curriculum, environment and/or learner.
• Precise, clear goal must be set before plan
implementation.
• Goal should be a specific description of desired
change in student behavior.
• Goal should be a SMART goal.
Discuss and Select Solutions
S- Specific
M- Measurable
A- Attainable
R- Relevant
T- Time-Bound
Activity: SMART Practice
• List 5 items on your “Bucket List.”
• Write a SMART goal for one of your items.
Is it Specific?
Is it Measureable?
Is it Attainable?
Is it Relevant?
Is it Time-bound?
Ex: After training for twelve weeks, I will complete
the Outer Banks Half-Marathon on November 10, 2013.
Data-Based Decision
Making
Develop Action Plan
Develop and Implement Action Plan:
Design
• The most effective plans utilize multiple strategies
that affect all causes of the problem.
• To ensure fidelity of implementation, specific tasks
need to be assigned to individuals with a timeline
for checking back.
• Change takes time, so implement the plan for a
set amount of time (dependent on complexity and
intensity of problem) before evaluating.
Develop and Implement Action Plan:
Design
Data Decision Guidelines
• Intensity of plan
• Frequency of monitoring
• Tool(s) being utilized
How will we determine success along the way?
Develop and Implement Action Plan:
After Creation
• Once strategies are selected, specific tasks need to be
delegated and tracked using an action plan.
• Action plans should drive the creation of future meeting
agendas as well as generate clear action steps at the end
of each meeting.
• Effective action plans are:
•
•
•
•
Used regularly
Frequently reviewed and updated
Accessible to all staff involved in implementing plan
Made of specific, manageable action steps with clear timelines
Develop and Implement Action Plan:
Ensuring Fidelity
Use weekly 1-5 survey from teachers to assess
implementation of plan.
Are we doing the plan?
1 ….. 2 …..3 ….. 4 ….. 5
No
Yes
Fidelity
Newton, J.S., Todd, A. W., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine K., 2010
Data-Based Decision
Making
Evaluate and Revise Action
Plan
Evaluate and Revise Action Plan
Review data to answer the following question:
Has the goal been met?
• If yes, explore the following options:
1. Increase goal for the same problem.
2. Choose another problem to address.
3. Gradually fade plan.
Evaluate and Revise Action Plan
Review data to answer the following question:
Has the goal been met?
•If no, explore the following options:
1. Evaluate fidelity of implementation.
2. Assess problem identification.
3. Consider the accuracy of the hypothesis.
4. Alter the timeline.
5. Find ways to adjust the solutions.
6. Review “like peer” data.
Making Connections
Connecting Types of
Data within TIPS
• Evaluate
and Revise
Action Plan
Where do
do you
you see
see utilizing
utilizing
Where
PERCEPTION
data
this
model
PROCESS data
OUTCOME
inin
this
model
Data-Based Decision
Making
School-Wide Case Study
The following activities work best when sitting in small groups
based on building level (ex: elementary, middle, high school)
Case Study: Context
• Mid year school improvement team (SIP) meeting
• Academic and behavior outcome data is
presented
School-Wide Case Study Data
As a team choose a grade level and
academic area to apply to this data set.
Academic
Data
Discipline
Data
Activity: Identify Problems in School-Wide
Case Study
• Note discrepancies between what is desired and
what exists.
• Identify any patterns or trends.
• Is there a problem?
• As a team, agree on the problem statement
School-Wide Case Study:
Develop Hypothesis
Instruction
Curriculum
Review
Review
Review
Review
Interview
Interview
Interview
Interview
Observe
Observe
Observe
Observe
Test
Test
Test
Test
Environment
Learner
Activity: Develop the Hypothesis for
School-Wide Case Study
• As a team, develop the hypothesis(es) by
considering Instruction, Curriculum, Environment
and (ICE).
• Plan how to Review, Interview, Observe and/or
Test (RIOT) in order to test your hypothesis(es).
• Be prepared to share with the group.
School-Wide Case Study:
Digging Deeper
Handout
What questions do you have about instruction,
curriculum and environment for this grade level?
Instruction
Curriculum
Environment
Activity: Discuss and Select Solutions for
School-Wide Case Study
• Discuss and select solutions connected to your
precise problem statement.
• Create a goal for possible solutions.
• Ensure the creation of a SMART goal by asking
these questions:
Is it Specific?
Is it Measureable?
Is it Attainable?
Is it Relevant?
Is it Time-bound?
Activity: Develop and Implement Action
Plan for School-Wide Case Study
• Create some action items for this sample team.
• Do your action items include a time/date for
completion?
• Do your action items name the person(s)
responsible?
• Is there a way to measure fidelity of implementation?
• Determine procedure for progress monitoring (tools
and frequency).
Evaluate and Revise Action Plan of the
School-Wide Case Study
Use the data to answer: Has the goal been met?
If no, explore the following options:
If yes, explore the following
1.Evaluate fidelity of implementation.
options:
1. Increase goal for the
same problem.
2.Assess problem identification.
3.Consider the accuracy of the hypothesis.
2. Choose another problem
4.Alter the timeline.
to address.
3. Gradually fade use of
5.Find ways to adjust the solutions.
the plan or convert
6.Review “like peer” data.
successful plans into
policy/procedure/practice
.
Data-Based Decision
Making
Individual Student Case Study
Individual Student Data - Jessica
• Attendance issues: has missed 12/40 school days
• At risk to fail math: has failed first 2 tests and
turned in 5 assignments late, initial benchmark
scores were 30% below the target score (as
established in HomeBase)
• Has been tardy to class 8 times
• 1 out-of-school suspension for unexcused
absences
Individual Student Data - Johnnie
K - Spring
1st - Fall
PSF
37 (40)
30 (40)
NWF
25 (28)
25 (27)
1st - Winter
29 (43)
ORF
TRC
17 (23)
C (D)
C (D)
D (G-H)
Black = Johnnie’s scores
Red = Benchmark scores
Attendance
Office Referrals
Kindergarten
173/180
0
First Grade
80/92
3 (disruptive behaviors)
Activity: Identify Problems in Individual
Student Case Study
• Note discrepancies between what is desired and
what exists.
• Identify any patterns or trends.
• Is there a problem?
• As a team, agree on the problems to be
addressed first.
Activity: Individual Student Case Study
Data: Digging Deeper
Handout
What questions do you have about instruction, curriculum,
environment and the learner based on this data?
Instruction
Curriculum
Environment
Learner
Individual Student Case Study:
Develop Hypothesis
Instruction
Curriculum
Review
Review
Review
Review
Interview
Interview
Interview
Interview
Observe
Observe
Observe
Observe
Test
Test
Test
Test
Environment
Learner
Activity: Develop the Hypothesis for
Individual Student Case Study
• As a team, develop the hypothesis(es) by
considering Instruction, Curriculum, Environment
and Learner (ICEL).
• Plan how to Review, Interview, Observe and/or
Test (RIOT) in order to test your hypothesis(es).
• Be prepared to share with the group.
Activity: Discuss and Select Solutions for
Individual Case Study
• Discuss and select solutions connected to your
precise problem statement.
• Create a goal for possible solutions.
• Ensure the creation of a SMART goal by asking
these questions:
Is it Specific?
Is it Measureable?
Is it Attainable?
Is it Relevant?
Is it Time-bound?
Activity: Develop and Implement Action
Plan for Individual Student Case Study
• Create some action items for this sample team.
• Do your action items include a time/date for
completion?
• Do your action items name the person(s)
responsible?
• Is there a way to measure fidelity of
implementation?
• Determine procedure for progress monitoring (tools
and frequency).
Evaluate and Revise Action Plan of the
Individual Case Study
Use the data to answer: Has the goal been met?
If no, explore the following options:
If yes, explore the
following options:
1. Increase goal for the
same problem.
2. Choose another
problem to address.
3. Gradually fade use of
the plan.
1.Evaluate fidelity of implementation.
2.Assess problem identification.
3.Consider the accuracy of the hypothesis.
4.Alter the timeline.
5.Find ways to adjust the solutions.
6.Review “like peer” data.
Data-Based Decision
Making
Questions?
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2013-14 Fall RESA Training for School Counselors Linda H