Big Question: How can
nature challenge us?
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legal
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idealistic
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Vocabulary Words
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branded
constructed
daintily
devastation
lullaby
pitch
resourceful
thieving
veins
More Words to Know
cantankerous
 irascible
 varmint
 meteorologist
 roaring
 severe
 terror
 tornado
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Question of the Day
How can nature
challenge us?
Build Concepts
 Cause and Effect
 Monitor and Fix Up
 Build Background
 Vocabulary
 Fluency: Model Tone of Voice
 Grammar: Subjects and Predicates
 Spelling: Long Vowel VCV
 Challenges in Nature

Fluency
 Listen
as I read “Night of the
Twisters.”
 As I read, notice how I use my voice
to convey the sense of fear that the
boys felt as the tornado tore apart
the house above them.
 Be ready to answer questions after I
finish.
 What
caused the boys to
seek shelter in the
basement?
 Describe the damage caused
by the tornado.
meteorologist – a scientist
who studies the atmosphere
and weather
 roaring – making a loud, deep
sound or noise
 severe – serious or harsh

terror – great fear
 tornado – an extremely
violent and destructive funnelshaped windstorm
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(Next Slide)
Careers
Challenges
in Nature
Descriptions
Storms
Tall Tales
Word
branded
constructed
daintily
devastation
lullaby
pitch
resourceful
thieving
veins
Know
Have Seen
Don’t Know
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branded – marked by burning the
skin with a hot iron
constructed – pull together;
fitted together; built
daintily – with delicate beauty;
freshly and prettily
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devastation – the act of laying
waste; destruction
lullaby – song for singing to a
child; soft song
pitch – a thick, black, sticky
substance made from tar or
turpentine
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resourceful – good at thinking of
ways to do things; quick witted
thieving – stealing
veins – membranous tubes
forming part of the system of
vessels that carry blood to the
heart
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cantankerous – ready to make
trouble; ill-natured
irascible – easily made angry
varmint – an objectionable animal
or person (dialect)
(Next Slide)
Grammar
Subjects and Predicates
 do
you know eny lullabys
 Do you know any lullabies?
 these songs puts babys to
sleep
 These songs put babies to
sleep.
 Her
voice rang out so clear and
real and true.
 The
complete subject of this
sentence is Her voice and the
complete predicate is rang out so
clear and real and true.
 Every
sentence has a subject and
a predicate.
 The
words that tell whom or what
the sentence is about are the
complete subject.
 The
most important word in the
complete subject is the simple
subject. It is usually a noun or a
pronoun. Some simple subjects
have more than one word, such as
United States.
 A gentle lullaby relaxes everyone.
(The simple subject is lullaby.)
 The
words that tell what the
subject is or does are the complete
predicate.
 The
most important word in the
complete predicate is the simple
predicate, or verb. Some simple
predicates have more than one
word, such as is walking.
 My
aunt plays lullabies on the piano.
(The simple predicate is plays.)
A
fragment is a group of words
that lacks either a subject or a
predicate.
 The
power of music. (This fragment
lacks a predicate.)
A
run-on is two or more complete
sentences run together.
 Our
whole family loves music we
attend many concerts. (Our whole
family loves music. We attend many
concerts.)
 Many
babies respond well to music.
 Many
babies / respond well to
music.
 Little
babies can learn a lot.
 Little
babies / can learn a lot.
I
practice piano every afternoon.
I
/ practice piano every afternoon.
 My
baby sister becomes very still.
 My
baby sister / becomes very still.
 She
listens intently.
 She
/ listens intently.
 All
people can enjoy good music.
 All
people / can enjoy good music.
 Beautiful
music will calm angry
 Beautiful
music / will calm angry
feelings.
feelings.
 Our
dog can sing she howls along
with the piano.

run-on
 Animals

sentence
 Most

must find our music odd.
of our many pets.
fragment
 They

like it they put up with it.
run-on
 The
whole family will attend a
concert tonight.
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sentence
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fever
broken
climate
hotel
basic
vocal
native
silent
labor
spider
label
icon
agent
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motive
vital
acorn
item
aroma
legal
solo
society
rhinoceros
notation
idealistic
equation
Question of the Day
Why do you think Rose
likes to take on
challenges?
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Context Clues
Cause and Effect
Monitor Fix Up
Character and Plot
Vocabulary
Fluency: Echo Reading
Grammar: Subjects and Predicates
Spelling: Long Vowel VCV
Science: Lightning
Myths and Nature
Challenges in Nature
Fluency
 Turn
to page 51, paragraphs 3-5.
 Notice how my voice rises and falls
as I read the strings of phrases and
emphasize the italicized words.
 Now we will practice together as a
class by doing three echo readings of
these paragraphs.
Grammar
Subjects and Predicates
whats the climet like where you
live
 What’s the climate like where
you live?
 in Spring, we sometimes has
tornadoes here
 In spring, we sometimes have
tornadoes here.

A
complete subject is the part
of a sentence that tells whom or
what the sentence is about.
A
complete predicate is the part
of a sentence that tells what the
subject is or does.
A
fragment is a group of words
that lack a subject or predicate.
A
run-on is two or more complete
sentences run together.
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fever
broken
climate
hotel
basic
vocal
native
silent
labor
spider
label
icon
agent
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motive
vital
acorn
item
aroma
legal
solo
society
rhinoceros
notation
idealistic
equation
Question of the Day
What kind of force does
Rose use to overpower
the tornadoes?
 Cause
and Effect
 Monitor and Fix Up
 Plot
 Vocabulary
 Fluency: Model Tone of Voice
 Grammar: Subjects and Predicates
 Spelling: Long Vowel VCV
 Science: Tornadoes
 Challenges in Nature
Fluency
 Turn
to page 56, first two
paragraphs.
 Notice how I pause at the commas to
emphasize the beginnings and
endings of phrases.
 Now we will practice together as a
class by doing three echo readings of
these paragraphs.
Grammar
Subjects and Predicates
my sister write funny tall tails
 My sister writes funny tall
tales.
 they are a laber of love for she
 They are a labor of love for
her.

A
complete subject is the part
of a sentence that tells whom or
what the sentence is about.
A
complete predicate is the part
of a sentence that tells what the
subject is or does.
A
fragment is a group of words
that lack a subject or predicate.
A
run-on is two or more complete
sentences run together.
 Making
sure every sentence has a
subject and a predicate will
ensure that complete thoughts
are written.
 Check
over what you have written
to see if there are any fragments
or run-ons you need to correct.
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fever
broken
climate
hotel
basic
vocal
native
silent
labor
spider
label
icon
agent
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motive
vital
acorn
item
aroma
legal
solo
society
rhinoceros
notation
idealistic
equation
Question of the Day
Why do you think people
often tell tales about
destructive forces of
nature?
 Expository
 Reading
Nonfiction
Across Texts
 Content-Area
 Fluency:
Partner Reading
 Grammar:
 Spelling:
 Science:
Texts
Four Kinds of Sentences
Short Vowel VCCV, VCV
Storm Warnings
Fluency
 Turn
to page 56, first two
paragraphs.
 Read these paragraphs three
times with a partner. Be sure to
raise and lower your voice to
show groups of words. Offer
each other feedback.
Grammar
Subjects and Predicates
alice is a storyteler she makes
storys come to life
 Alice is a storyteller. She
makes stories come to life.
 the children were silint when
she telled a ghost story.
 The children were silent when
she told a ghost story.
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A
complete subject is the part
of a sentence that tells whom or
what the sentence is about.
A
complete predicate is the part
of a sentence that tells what the
subject is or does.
A
fragment is a group of words
that lack a subject or predicate.
A
run-on is two or more complete
sentences run together.
 Test
A
Tip:
run-on can be corrected in
different ways. You can write it
as two separate sentences, or you
can add a comma and a
conjunction to make a compound
sentence.
I love short stories I
am also fond of poems.
 Two Sentences: I love short
stories. I am also fond of poems.
 Compound Sentences: I love
short stories, but I am also fond
of poems.
 Run-on:
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fever
broken
climate
hotel
basic
vocal
native
silent
labor
spider
label
icon
agent
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motive
vital
acorn
item
aroma
legal
solo
society
rhinoceros
notation
idealistic
equation
Question of the Day
How can nature
challenge us?
 Build
Concept Vocabulary
 Cause and Effect
 Author’s Craft
 Context Clues
 Grammar: Subjects and Predicates
 Spelling: Long Vowel VCV
 Almanac
 Challenges in Nature
 An
effect is what happened as
the result of a cause.
 A cause is what made something
happen.
 Words such as why, because, and
as a result are clues to causeand-effect relationships.
 If
there are no clue words, ask
yourself, “Why did this event
happen? What happened as a
result of this event?”
 An effect may become the cause
of another effect.
Cause
Effect
Cause
Effect
 When
an author goes about
creating a piece of writing, he or
she makes choices about the
genre, or kind of writing, it will be,
who the characters are, what the
setting and plot will be, the point
of view from which it will be
written, and what type of language
and style he or she will use.
 Homonyms
are spelled and pronounced
the same but have different meanings.
 If you come across a homonym in your
reading, you should look for context
clues that can help you figure out the
word’s meaning.
 Write homonyms from Thunder Rose
and a sentence for each meaning of
the word.
Homonym
Sentence
 Name
a single book that can
identify our state’s governor, its
tallest building, and its hottest
day last year—a dictionary, one
volume of an encyclopedia, or an
almanac.
 An
almanac is a book published yearly
containing calendars, weather
information, dates of holidays, and
charts of current information.
include addresses,
telephone numbers, and e-mail
addresses of many agencies and
organization.
 Almanacs
 Almanacs
contain basic information
about population, climate, and
geography of many cities, states, and
organization.
list well-known people and
prize winners in science, sports, and
the arts.
 Almanacs
 Almanacs
tool.
can be a valuable research
Grammar
Subjects and Predicates
a horses hoofbeates sound like
drumming
 A horse’s hoofbeats sound like
drumming.
 a stampeding, herd of cattel
must sound like thunder
 A stampeding herd of cattle
must sound like thunder.

A
complete subject is the part
of a sentence that tells whom or
what the sentence is about.
A
complete predicate is the part
of a sentence that tells what the
subject is or does.
A
fragment is a group of words
that lack a subject or predicate.
A
run-on is two or more complete
sentences run together.
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
fever
broken
climate
hotel
basic
vocal
native
silent
labor
spider
label
icon
agent
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motive
vital
acorn
item
aroma
legal
solo
society
rhinoceros
notation
idealistic
equation

Story test
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› Reading Test
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