Welcome to USD!
Preceptor: Dr. Casey Dominguez
What are we doing today?
 Introductions
 What is a liberal arts education and why
might it benefit you?
 What are the requirements for your liberal
arts education here at USD?
 Tools for fulfilling requirements
 Rules about academic honesty
Introductions: Me
Dr. Casey Dominguez
[email protected]
Office: 285 KIPJ
You!
Full name, hometown, and
one interesting thing about you!
What are we doing today?
 Introductions
 What is a liberal arts education and why
might it benefit you?
 What are the requirements for your liberal
arts education here at USD?
 Tools for fulfilling requirements
 Rules about academic honesty
“The College of Arts and Sciences is a
Liberal Arts College”
 What does that mean???
What is a liberal arts education?
 A truly liberal education is one that prepares us to live
responsible, productive, and creative lives in a
dramatically changing world. It is an education that
fosters a well-grounded intellectual resilience, a
disposition toward lifelong learning, and an acceptance
of responsibility for the ethical consequences of our
ideas and actions. Liberal education requires that we
understand the foundations of knowledge and inquiry
about nature, culture and society; that we master core
skills of perception, analysis, and expression; that we
cultivate a respect for truth; that we recognize the
importance of historical and cultural context; and that we
explore connections among formal learning, citizenship,
and service to our communities.
-American Association of Colleges and Universities
From How Should Colleges Assess And Improve Student Learning? Employers’ Views On The Accountability Challenge A
Survey Of Employers Conducted On Behalf Of: The Association Of American Colleges And Universities By Peter D. Hart
Research Associates, Inc. January 9, 2008
Employers conclude that:
 High school-style regurgitation on multiple choice and
other simple exams is virtually worthless in the
workplace

Good news! That’s the kind of education you would get
at many larger colleges/universities, but not (mostly) at
USD (and certainly not in Political Science!)
 Today’s college graduates lack Global knowledge,
critical thinking skills, and the ability to work and meet
deadlines independently


Good news! AT USD you will be held to these higher
standards that are more valuable in the real world!
Bad news! You have to work harder!
Why you benefit from a challenging
liberal arts education
 Studying a broad range of subjects will give you
 Skills and cultural competencies to thrive in a global
economy
 Exposure to subjects beyond your comfort zone will
 Help you identify interests you didn’t know you had
 Develop self knowledge about your own strengths
 Help you develop critical thinking skills
 Projects that require research and writing will help you
develop the abilities



to work independently
to find and organize information
to communicate clearly
What are we doing today?
 Introductions
 What is a liberal arts education and why
might it benefit you?
 What are the requirements for your liberal
arts education here at USD?
 Tools for fulfilling requirements
 Rules about academic honesty
The requirements for your liberal arts
education at USD
 The Core Curriculum
 Indispensable competencies
 Traditions
 Horizons
 Diversity
 Courses that qualify (NOT ALL DO!):
http://www.sandiego.edu/core/courselist.php
 Completion of requirements in a specific major field
of study
Indispensable Competencies:
Course Requirements
 Written literacy
 one lower division English class (121/122)
 one upper division “W” class in any subject
 Math competency*
 Math 112, 114, 115, 130, 150 or higher


Business majors must complete Math 130 (Survey of Calculus).
Math/Science/Computer Science/Engineering students must complete Math 150 (Calculus).
 Critical reasoning (Logic)
 Philosophy 101 or 102

Math or CS majors should take Math 160 (Logic for Math) rather than Phil 101 or 102.
 Language*
 Complete 201 or higher level class in any foreign
language
***Get those math and language requirements done early before you forget
everything you’ve learned!
Option 2: Competency Exams
 Pay fees at the Cashier’s Office (Hughes 207) and take receipt
to the department running the exam.
 Department will give you location/time of the exam
 Do not get academic units for exam, just get out of requirement




August 31: Competency exams in Foreign Languages and Logic
October 15: Deadline to pay competency exam fee
October 30: Competency exam in math
November 6: Competency exam, lower and upper division
English
Help!
 Tutoring centers:
 Logic Center; FH 160
 Mathematics Center; Serra Hall 310
 Writing Center; FH 190B
The requirements for your liberal arts
education at USD
 The Core Curriculum
 Indispensable competencies
 Traditions
 Horizons
 Diversity
 Courses that qualify (NOT ALL DO!):
http://www.sandiego.edu/core/courselist.php
 Completion of requirements in a specific major field
of study
Traditions
 Religious studies—three classes

One lower division, one upper division, one
either
 Philosophy (besides Logic)

One class (check listings for qualifying
courses)
 Ethics (Philosophy dept)

One class (check listings for qualifying
courses)
Horizons





History (one class)
Literature (one class, any language)
Fine Arts (one class)
Physical science (one class)
Life science (one class)

Either physical science or life science class
must have a LAB section with it
 Social science (two classes from two different
departments)

PS 125 counts as one of these!
Diversity
 PS 125 counts as your diversity requirement
What are we doing today?
 Introductions
 What is a liberal arts education and why
might it benefit you?
 What are the requirements for your liberal
arts education here at USD?
 Tools for fulfilling requirements
 Rules about academic honesty
Your course schedule
 Should be assigned to 12-15 units.
 12 is minimum for full time status
 Most students take 15 or 18 units per
semester (5-6 classes)
 6 classes is A VERY HEAVY LOAD.
 To take more than 18 units you need the
approval of the Dean
 You can make changes to your schedule
online for the first eight days of class
What if I’m in enrolled the wrong
math/ language class?
 You can go to “webreg” and try to enroll in the
correct level class
 If it is full, you can go to the class meeting,
introduce yourself to the professor and ask to
be let into the class. They can do this online.
What if I took the AP/IB exam?
 AP credit transfers
 IB exam transfers
 CLEP exam transfers
Important dates
 Last day to add classes: Monday, Sept. 13
 Last day to drop a class without a W on your transcript:




Monday, Sept. 13
Intersession Registration begins: Oct 11
Deadline to choose Grade/P-F option: Oct. 25.
REQUIRES my signature on an add-drop form.
Spring 2010 registration begins: Nov. 2 (for seniors)
Last day to withdraw from classes: Nov. 9
 Where is this info? www.sandiego.edu/academiccalendar
DARS
 (MySanDiego, One Stop, My Registration
channel, DARS link).
 How it works
Transferring courses from other
colleges
 GET ADVANCE PERMISSION by filling out a
Petition to Transfer of Credit form
 Online at www.sandiego.edu/registrar .
 Needs advisor signature and signatures of
the department chair in the comparable
department in which the course is being
taken, and the transfer analyst or the dean.
What are we doing today?
 Introductions
 What is a liberal arts education and why
might it benefit you?
 What are the requirements for your liberal
arts education here at USD?
 Tools for fulfilling requirements
 Rules about academic honesty
Plagiarism and Academic
Honesty
Rule 1: Always enclose an
author’s actual words within
quotation marks and include
a full and accurate citation
Copying entire or partial texts without
adding both quotation marks and full
citation is plagiarism.
Source Text
 The sudden wild passion for private property in the
realm of knowledge creation has given rise to a
rather paradoxical situation (Foray 1999). The
technological conditions (codification and low-cost
transmission) may be right for individuals to be able
to enjoy instant and unfettered access to new
knowledge, but a proliferation of intellectual property
rights prevent access to such knowledge in hitherto
protected areas (basic research in general, life
science, software). (18-19)

David, Paul A., and Dominique Foray. “An Introduction to the Economy of the
Knowledge Society.” International Social Science Journal 171 (2002): 9-37.
Plagiarism: no quotation marks
 Although, on the one hand, current
technological conditions seem to be right for
individuals to gain immediate and free access
to new knowledge, claims of intellectual
property rights impede that access (David
and Foray 18-19).
 (Full, accurate citation added at the end of
the paper.)
Source Text
 The sudden wild passion for private property in the
realm of knowledge creation has given rise to a
rather paradoxical situation (Foray 1999). The
technological conditions (codification and low-cost
transmission) may be right for individuals to be
able to enjoy instant and unfettered access to new
knowledge, but a proliferation of intellectual
property rights prevent access to such knowledge
in hitherto protected areas (basic research in general,
life science, software). (18-19)

The previous passage used words that were not the author’s and did not
put them in quotation marks.
Rule 2: Always paraphrase by thoroughly
reshaping the original in accordance with
your own vocabulary, syntax, and
sentence rhythm. Paraphrases require full
and accurate citations.
To paraphrase means to restate a text in your own words;
this requires that you rewrite the original text in a
significantly new way. Inadequate paraphrases may
include sentence patterns close to those of the source
and/or synonyms of words found in the original.
Plagiarism: Inadequate paraphrase
 Example C
 Although on the one hand, current
“technological conditions” seem to “be right
for individuals” to gain immediate and free
“access to new knowledge,” claims of
“intellectual property rights” impede that
“access” (David and Foray 18-19).
 Uses quotation marks, but just substitutes
synonyms for the original wording
Source Text
 The sudden wild passion for private property in the
realm of knowledge creation has given rise to a
rather paradoxical situation (Foray 1999). The
technological conditions (codification and low-cost
transmission) may be right for individuals to be able
to enjoy instant and unfettered access to new
knowledge, but a proliferation of intellectual property
rights prevent access to such knowledge in hitherto
protected areas (basic research in general, life
science, software). (18-19)

The previous passage used words that were not the author’s and did not
put them in quotation marks.
A much better paraphrase
 Example E
 David and Foray suggest that legal claims
regarding the ownership of ideas conflict with
expectations of “instant and unfettered
access” to information (18-19).
RULE 3: Work to
preserve the intent and
context of a source.
Example F: May be plagiarized
 David and Foray note a contradiction between the
“sudden wild passion” for the ownership of ideas and
the simultaneous explosion of publicly available
information (18-19).
 In the original, the section quoted here is followed by
“(Foray 1999)”; this citation indicates that David and
Foray are referring to an earlier article written by
Foray (maybe the same Foray, maybe not). The
Foray 1999 article is the “primary” or “direct” source.
The David and Foray 2002 article is the “secondary”
or “indirect” source. Without studying the earlier
article, it is difficult to know whether example F
preserves the context and intent of the primary
source.
Better
 Example G
 David and Foray, referring to a 1999 article
by Foray, note contradiction between the
“sudden wild passion” for the ownership of
ideas and the simultaneous explosion publicly
available information (18-19).
Ask your professors!















May I write in first person?
Do I need to use a specific font or margin?
Do I need to use outside sources in my writing?
How many sources do I need to include?
How recent must my sources be?
May I use internet sources?
Is there a limit to the number of internet sources I may include?
How should I evaluate internet sources?
Are there types of internet sources I should avoid?
What is a writing style guide?
What referencing style should I use American Psychological
Association (APA), Modern Language Association (MLA), Chicago,
etc?
May I use secondary sources?
If I use secondary sources, how should I cite them?
Do you require copies of my sources when I submit my paper?
May I submit my paper via email?
My answers:
 May I write in first person?
 YES
 Do I need to use a specific font or margin?
 YES: 12 point Times New Roman
 Do I need to use outside sources in my writing? How
many sources do I need to include? How recent must
my sources be?

DEPENDS ON THE ASSIGNMENT
 May I use internet sources?
 YES
 Is there a limit to the number of internet sources I
may include?

NO
 How should I evaluate internet sources?
 FOR THEIR CREDIBILITY and BIAS
My answers:
 Are there types of internet sources I should avoid?
 WIKIPEDIA
 What is a writing style guide?
 A STANDARD FORMAT. IN POLISCI WE USE THE
CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE
 May I use secondary sources?
 IN THIS CLASS, YES.
 Do you require copies of my sources when I submit
my paper?

YES
 May I submit my paper via email?
 DEPENDS ON THE ASSIGNMENT. IF SO IT IS DUE AT
THE BEGINNING OF CLASS, JUST LIKE IT WOULD BE
ON PAPER.
Descargar

Welcome to USD - University of San Diego