Presentation on SABC Draft Editorial Policies
10 October 2003
Agenda
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Overview of draft policies
Process of public consultation
Response to campaign
Analysis of submissions received
Next steps
2
Background on the policies (1 of 4)
• On 25 April SABC published a number of draft editorial policies for public
comment:
• Mandate
• News
• Programming
• Language
• Universal service and Access
• Local content
• Religion
• Education
• Focused on those policies mentioned in the Broadcasting Act
•The policies explain the SABC’s approach to different areas of its
performance e.g. how we will fulfil mandate to broadcast in all official
languages
3
Background on the policies (2 of 4)
• Why did the SABC publish these policies?
• Broadcasting Act (as amended) states that the SABC must develop draft
editorial policies, allow for public comment on them and then submit them
to ICASA within 3 months of conversion
• When finalised, these policies will fulfil two purposes:
• A guide to editorial staff in their daily decision making
• A guide to the public on what they can expect from the public
broadcaster
• The policies did not give detail on schedules or programme content - they
rather provide a high level description of what can be expected from the SABC
as a public broadcaster
• Some policies will replace existing policies from 1995 which are now
outdated while others are new
4
Background on policies (3 of 4)
Scope
• They apply to all SABC content, whether produced by SABC or not
• Where they have particular relevance to either the commercial or the
public broadcasting division, this is stated
Methodology
• International comparative review
• Review of existing policies against legal and regulatory requirements
• Workshops and brainstorming sessions
• Drafts prepared and circulated for comment
• Responses fed into database
5
Background on policies (4 of 4)
Structure
• Draft policies structured to minimise difficulties in implementation:
• Clearly stated set of commitments in the draft policies
• Outlined to which areas of the SABC each draft policy is
applicable and how it should be applied
• Cross-referred between the policies, when the same issue is dealt
with in more than one policy
• Linked each draft policy to legislation, regulations and PBS
mandate
• Built in reporting requirements to Board on the implementation of
the policies
• Standardised the period of time the policies will stand - each will
be applicable for 5 years and will then be reviewed by Board
• Stated that the policies are underpinned by certain assumptions,
including the structure and funding of the Corporation. If these
assumptions change, the policies may need to be amended
6
Overview of draft policies
Mandate
• Not strictly one of the draft policies - rather acts as an introduction to the
package of policies
• Outlines SABC understanding of public broadcasting in SA - therefore a
critical background to the policies
• Lays out the core editorial values of the SABC:
• Equality
• Editorial independence
• Nation building
• Diversity
• Human Dignity
• Accountability
• Transparency
• Contains the amended Editorial Code
• Lays out the principles of editorial responsibility and upward referral
7
Overview of draft policies
Programming
• Primarily focused on explaining how we deal with issues such as the airing
of violence, sex and bad language
• This draft policy replaces the Guidelines on Programme Content which
were approved by Board in 1995
• The policy now consistent with the new Code of Conduct for Broadcasters
and also applicable to radio
• Areas covered, include:
• Language
• Discrimination and stereotypes
• Violence
• Grief and Suffering
• Children.
• Sex and nudity
• Programme complaints etc
8
Overview of draft policies
News, Current Affairs and Information (1 of 2)
• Explains the SABC’s role in providing meaningful news, current affairs
and information programmes from a South African perspective
• Sets out the following commitments for news practice:
• We do not allow advertising, commercial, political or personal issues
to influence our news
• We include a range of different views on issues
• We respect people’s right to reply to criticism
• We correct mistakes as soon as possible
• We do not use language that is sexist, racist or discriminates against
any person or group
• We always check information and confirm the accuracy of any report
9
Overview of draft policies
News, Current Affairs and Information (2 of 2)
• We try to ensure fair gender representation – and seek out the views of
women
• We protect people who provide us with information. If a court orders
us to identify a source of information, we support the journalist’s
decision and provide them with legal help
• We respect people’s right to privacy – unless it is in the public interest
to reveal information
• We cover accidents and disaster with compassion. We do not show
footage of the dead unless there are compelling reasons to do so
• We give full or extended live coverage to events of national importance
• During elections the SABC makes sure that voters are given sufficient
information to enable them to make informed choices about who to
vote for
• We comply with the restrictions on the sponsorship of news and
current affairs programmes
10
Overview of draft policies
Language (1 of 5)
• Replaces the Language Policy of 1995
• Policy is founded on the constitutional imperative to treat all languages
equitably and with respect
• Makes series of clear commitments for radio and TV, formalises many
current practices, e.g. multi-lingual programming, rotation of cognate
languages
General commitments
• Commit to maintaining distinct and separate radio services in all official
languages (and to allocate resources fairly to each language service)
• Commit to treating all official languages equitably across the television
portfolio, although we will give more time to more widely spoken
languages
• Commit to integrating sign language into programmes
• Commit to accommodate other non-official languages such as Khoi,
Nama and San
11
Overview of draft policies
Language (2 of 5)
Guidelines on what equitable treatment means:
• No guidelines in previous policy
• Policy lays out how the SABC understands equitability on TV
• Means fair, just and reasonable, does not necessarily mean equal time
• Has to be achieved while also making sure broadcasts are accessible
to as many viewers as possible - more time for more widely understood
languages
• Equitability is achieved through both unilingual and multilingual
programming and by rotating cognate languages
• Is measured by a number of criteria:
• time allocation to different languages
• scheduling of different language programmes when audiences are
available
• range of programmes in different languages
• resourcing of programmes in different languages
12
Overview of draft policies
Language (3 of 5)
Guidelines on time allocation:
• No guidelines for time allocation in previous policy
• Policy now makes explicit the factors that will be taken into account
when time allocations for different languages are devised for TV
• In determining allocations of time to different languages on television,
the SABC has due regard to:
• The number of home language speakers of a language in the
coverage area of a channel
•The geographical spread of the language
•The extent to which members of a language community are able to
understand other languages
•The extent of marginalisation of the language
•The extent to which a language is understood by other South
Africans
13
Overview of draft policies
Language (4 of 5)
Specific commitments
• Radio language services to broadcast news and current affairs,
children’s programmes and educational material
• TV to provide news in all official languages
• TV to also focus on producing drama and children’s educational
programmes in various languages
• Selected TV news and events of national importance to carry sign
language - to be expanded progressively
14
Overview of draft policies
Language (5 of 5)
Specific commitments (cont)
• Management to submit an annual 3 year language action plan that
includes:
• Future goals arising from the policy
• Summary of previous year’s TV airtime per language per genre
(including sign language)
• A summary of the findings of any relevant research conducted
• A summary of professional development programmes implemented
to meet the competence and skills needs of implementing this policy
• A summary of investigations conducted into the use of technology
and the applications of technologies to implement this language
policy
• Highlights to be included in Annual Report
15
Overview of draft policies
Universal Service and Access (1 of 4)
• Policy describes the SABC’s approach to achieving universal service
and access
• Aims to facilitate the provision of a comprehensive end-to-end public
broadcasting service for all South Africans
• SABC has not had policy on this subject before, therefore the policy
defines universal service and access and sets aims for its achievement
Proposed definition
“The provision of a range of audio and video broadcasting services
to citizens. The services shall include, but are not limited to, radio
and television programmes that cater for information, cultural,
religious and educational needs and are delivered via the most
appropriate technical means available at an affordable cost to
broadcasters and audiences alike.”
16
Overview of draft policies
Universal Service and Access (2 of 4)
SABC Aims for Broadcasting Universal Service and Access
• To ensure that all South Africans have access to a broadcasting service
• To ensure that a radio service in each official language, providing a range
of programmes is broadcast (initially to reach at least 80% of the speakers
of each language)
• Thereafter, to ensure that audiences have access to a range of radio
services in a variety of official languages
• To ensure that at least two public service channels, providing a range of
programming in a variety of official languages are broadcast (initially to
reach at least 90% of the population)
17
Overview of draft policies
Universal Service and Access (3 of 4)
Factors to be taken into account when considering the expansion of a
service:
•
•
•
•
•
•
The extent of the proposed coverage
The number of people to reached by that expansion
The extent of need of those people
The cost of the expansion
The nature of the service to be provided by the expansion
Frequency spectrum availability
18
Overview of draft policies
Universal Service and Access (4 of 4)
Commitments
• Management to determine responsibility in the SABC for driving the
implementation of this policy
• Management to submit to board an annual 3 year action plan, including:
• A report of the Universal Service and Access achievements against
the stated aims, including reasons
• A breakdown of the services extended the previous year, including
increase in population coverage and cost
• Highlights to be published in Annual Report
19
Overview of draft policies
Local content
• SABC has not had policy on local content before
• This policy outlines the SABC’s commitment to airing local content on
radio and TV, in line with ICASA’s prescribed quotas
• Policy contains relevant ICASA definitions and outlines responsibility
within SABC to track and report on compliance
General commitments
• To ensure that local TV content is a significant and visible part of the
SABC’s schedules, throughout the broadcasting period, and in prime
time, in line with the quotas prescribed by ICASA
• To ensure that the SABC commissions a significant amount of its local
television content from the independent production industry, in line with
the quotas prescribed by ICASA
• To continue to play a high level and wide variety of SA music across
the SABC radio stations, in line with the quotas prescribed by ICASA
20
Overview of draft policies
Religion
• Replaces previous Board policy
• Largely consistent with previous policy - two major changes:
• Quotas of airtime for major religious groupings have been
taken out of the policy
• We now state that these quotas are developed on a 3
yearly basis after consultation with the RBP
• We lay out criteria to be considered when determining
airtime allocations: Census data on the % of population in
each religious group, the need for all religions to be reflected
in religious programming etc
• A clause allowing airtime to be purchased by religious groups
has been inserted, with a number of checks - detailed
operational guidelines to be developed
21
Overview of draft policies
Education (1 of 3)
• Replaces Board policy of 1995
• Sets out the framework within which the SABC implements its
educational mandate and responds to the national literacy and skills
development challenge
General commitments
• To provide range of quality educational programming including
programmes that support curriculum based activities of the education and
training sectors and programmes that support public education
• To ensure that PBS stations and channels dedicate adequate airtime to
educational programmes that are scheduled at appropriate times. At least
one TV channel to screen programmes specifically in support of school
curricula and this to be supplemented by PBS radio
22
Overview of draft policies
Education (2 of 3)
General commitments (cont)
• To ensure that commercial services support a culture of lifelong learning
through informal knowledge building initiatives relevant to their target
audience and format
•To provide educational programmes in various official languages and sign
language
• To broadcast a significant amount of locally produced educational material
• To implement a coherent education methodology that incorporates a
multimedia approach
• To supplement educational methodologies through outreach programmes
• To ensure that sufficient resources are dedicated to implement the
educational mandate
23
Overview of draft policies
Education (3 of 3)
Implementation
• SABC will develop annual three year action plan which identifies
education priorities, including hours of programming for each of the
educational mandate areas
• Educational mandate areas which have been identified are:
• Early childhood development
• Children at Home
• Formal education
• Youth development
• Adult and Human Resources development
• Public Education
24
Process for public consultation
Challenge - to make the policies widely accessible and easily
understandable
• Policies launched to key stakeholders and press on 25 April
• Copies of draft policies made available at all SABC regional offices
together with detailed, easy to read summaries in six official languages
• Copies of the policies accessible on SABC website and intranet in all
official languages.
• Full page ads, summarising policies and inviting people to comment in
Rapport, City Press, Sunday Sun, Beeld, Daily Sun, Illanga, The
Herald, Daily Dispatch
• In order to reach rural areas:
• Detailed easy to read summaries of the policies distributed to over
1000 post offices countrywide, in six official languages
• Poster campaign in 6 languages in post offices
25
Process for public consultation
• Use of own media
• Promos ran on SABC radio stations and TV channels until early
May intensively, and on a more low key basis thereafter
• SABC talk shows and discussion programmes were used to
promote discussion on the policies until June 13
• Public meetings
• Held public meetings in each of the 9 provinces
• Between 200 and 500 people attended each meeting
• Gave public the opportunity to interact directly with members of
the SABC board and management.
• Comments on policies had to be made in writing:
•Drop-off at regional offices
•e-mail, fax or post
26
Response to campaign
Publicity
•
Editorial coverage
•
•
Focus in print media
overwhelmingly on the upward
referral and “objectivity” issue. 20
newspaper columns on upward
referral alone
SABC talkshows and discussion
programmes encouraged
discussion on all aspects of the
policies.
27
Response to campaign
Submissions
• Excellent response by the public to the SABC’s call for comments on its draft
policies. 920 written submissions on the draft policies received. 847 from
individuals, 73 from organisations. Lots of goodwill in responses – “ownership”
of SABC
• The programming policy attracted the most number of comments with 600.
The next most commented on policy was Language and then Religion and
News.
Comments per policy
4%
4%
10%
16%
Education
Language
Local content
5%
Mandate
News
7%
Programming
Religion
45%
9%
Universal Access
28
Response to campaign
Submissions
• Most comments on the policies were general in nature with many comments
on issues of taste and decency but there were approximately 250 specific
suggestions on how the policies should be adjusted.
No. of specific suggestions made per
policy
4%
6%
10%
20%
Education
Language
Local content
Mandate
25%
5%
News
Programming
Religion
Universal Access
10%
20%
29
Response to campaign
Submissions
The nature of the organisational submissions differed with those made by
individuals. The submissions by individuals tended to focus on general
comments and frequently did not specifically address the draft policies.
Nature of individual submissions
Nature of organisational submissions
124, 11%
General comments
General
comments
79, 39%
Specific
recommendations
Specific
recommendations
125, 61%
1031, 89%
30
Response to campaign
Submissions
The organisations’ submissions tended to have comments more evenly spread
among the policies. The policy which was commented on the least by
organisations was the Universal Access policy, with the Language,
Programming and Mandate policies receiving the most attention.
Individual vs. Organisational per policy
Ind
cc
es
s
al
A
el
ig
io
n
R
ni
ve
rs
U
am
m
N
ew
s
in
g
Org
Pr
og
r
Ed
uc
at
io
n
La
ng
ua
ge
Lo
ca
lc
on
te
nt
M
an
da
te
50%
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
31
Analysis of submissions
Education
Education policy - comments made
45
15
General comments
Specific
recommendations
“Children need stimulation in
their own
language...Programmes like
Takalani Sesame should not
have various languages
mixed in one – rather keep
languages separate and
coherent”. N. Oelson, no.556
Comments received
• 60 comments were received on the Education policy which amounted to
4% of the total comments received on all policies.
•There was a lot of praise for the SABC’s educational programmes,
particularly Takalani Sesame.
•There were many calls for the SABC to provide more educational
programmes.
• There were criticisms that some of the SABC’s educational programmes
encourage children to be immoral.
32
Analysis of submissions
Comments received
Education
•There were suggestions that educational programmes should also focus
more on addressing disability issues and health issues such as HIV/Aids.
•Some submissions suggested that all educational programmes be in
English and some submissions argued against a multi-lingual approach in
educational programmes, saying that each language should have a
dedicated slot.
• It was suggested the policy should state that extreme caution must be
exercised in sponsoring educational programmes and also proposed that
the policy include reference to child-centered human rights issues such as
HIV / Aids and child abuse.
• Submissions said the policy should state the importance of democracy /
citizenship education.
• There were suggestions that the policy give more emphasis to the
portrayal of women and girl children and that a clause be included on the
promotion of gender equality.
•There was criticism that the policy needs to have specific concrete
measures so that progress can be evaluated.
33
Analysis of submissions
Language
Language policy - comments made
“We are also tired of being
made fools. Muvhango is not a
Venda drama”. F Mbedzi, no.
575
171
50
General
comments
Specific
recommendations
Comments received
• 221 comments received on the draft Language policy – 16% of total
comments received on all policies.
• That the SABC should treat all official languages equally (not equitably)
• That there should be more programming in marginalised languages and that
there should be redress for these language groupings
• That the size of the language grouping should be the only criterion which
determines the amount of air-time for that language
34
Analysis of submissions
Comments received
Language
• Submissions called for the policy to commit to targets for airtime for each
language.
• Submissions asked that a commitment to a % budget allocation for various
languages be included in the policy.
• There was the suggestion that the policy include a commitment that English
will not dominate on the SABC and that it will not be used as an anchor
language.
• Many deaf organisations made the submission that the policy should reflect
that a holistic approach is needed for meeting the needs of the deaf and that
sign language alone is not good enough. There was also the suggestion that
the policy commit to providing sub-titles in all official languages.
• There was the suggestion that the policy be reviewed every year, and not
every 5 years.
• It was suggested that the policy commit to covering events of national
importance in at least 6 languages.
• Submissions suggested that the grouping of cognate languages together be
approached with caution and that the policy reflect this.
35
Language
Current Performance
• Airtime for African languages in prime time has increased since 1999, from
approximately 25% to 30%, across SABC 1 and SABC 2.
• Now providing television news in each official language, for the first time.
SABC 1 - prime time language breakdown
SABC 2 - prime time language breakdown
29%
English
Other
47%
53%
English
Other
71%
• Clearly still gains to be made. Regional channels will be of great assistance.
SABC envisages that over time the majority of content on the regional
channels will be in languages other than English.
36
Analysis of submissions
Local content
Local content policy - comments made
57
12
General
comments
Specific
recommendations
“In regard to local content, the
current draft is inadequate in regard
to radio. It could do well to spell out
local content commitments that
encompass drama, documentaries
and participatory programming.”
Rhodes University, Department of
Journalism and Media Studies, no.
902.
Comments received
• 69 comments received on the draft Local Content policy – 5% of total
comments received on all policies.
• That the SABC should re-build the necessary in-house capacity to produce
local content
• That there should be more local drama
• That ICASA’s quotas should be exceeded
•That the SABC should commit to local content quotas beyond music on radio.
37
Local Content
Current Performance
Local content on television
• To date, SABC has been able to sustain high levels of local content, both in
the performance period and in prime time
69.49
•70
60.31
•60
54.61
51.50
•average % local
48.27
•50
42.43
•40
Full day
Prime Time
•30
•20
•10
•0
SABC 1
•Source: Broadcast Schedules
•Week 14 - 31 (31 March - 3 August 2003)
SABC 2
SABC 3
38
Local Content
Current Performance
Local content
• As of end August, local content quotas have increased substantially – public
channels must now have average of 55% and may only count local repeats at
50% of their duration for a limited number of screenings after which local
repeats must be counted as foreign content.
76.57
•80
•70
61.31
61.70
57.19
•average % local
•60
47.44
43.91
•50
•40
Full day
Prime Time
•30
•20
•10
•0
SABC 1
•Source: Broadcast Schedules
•Week 35 - 38 (25 August - 21 September 2003)
SABC 2
SABC 3
39
Analysis of submissions
Mandate
Mandate - comments made
Comments received
•
49
41
General
comments
Specific
recommendations
“We strongly recommend that
reference to upward referral,
particularly as it turns the CEO into the
Editor-in-Chief should be totally
discarded. What we suggest is to have
the highest level of referral being the
Head of News…” Freedom of
Expression Institute, no. 928
“Much of public discourse on the draft has focused on the issue of upward referral.
Personally, I find the positions articulated in the draft, and in explanatory comment by
the Board and Management, both cogent and logical”. J Netshitenzi, no. 911
“On the matter of upward referral, we believe it is simply normal that a hierarchy of
authority must exist in a journalistic enterprise. A reporter is not the same as an
editor, and editors have rank in turn. The buck stops with the editors-in-chief. But
these should be journalistic staff, not management. Perhaps the solution is as simple
as not referring to the CEO as editor-in-chief, and making the MD news the
mandatory referral point for high impact issues”. Democratic Alliance, no.889
40
Analysis of submissions
Comments received
Mandate
• 90 comments were received on the Mandate policy which amounted to 7% of total
comments received. Although more comments were received from individuals than
organisations on this policy (57 from individuals vs 33 from organisations) this is the
only policy where specific recommendations outweighed general comments.
• On the issue of upward referral there were contrasting submissions. Some argued
that the current provisions should remain as is while others stated that the section
should be deleted in its entirety. Many submissions argued that the current
formulation should be revised to make it clear that upward referral stops with the
editorial heads.
• Submissions were generally supportive of the editorial values although there was
the view that these values should not bind the news division as they would
undermine its independence.
•There were suggestions that provisions be included on the SABC’s role in
supporting the African renaissance and in providing truly national coverage.
• There were suggestions that the following provisions in the Code be reworked to
be clearer: privacy, coverage of government, protection of sources.
41
Analysis of submissions
News
News policy - comments made
“The working class hardly ever
makes it onto SABC news and
current affairs programmes”.
COSATU, no.886
95
24
General
comments
Specific
recommendations
“The news footage of violence
death and destruction needs to be
kept to an absolute minimum”. B
Richert, no. 591
Comments received
• 119 comments were received on the News policy which amounted to 9% of total
comments received.
• There were many calls for CNN to be brought back and for the SABC 3 news to be
moved back to 8pm. (These comments are probably indicative of the fact that the
policy process took place at the same time as these issues were being dealt with).
•There were calls for non-Western news networks such as Al Jazeera to also be
used by the SABC but there was also opposition to such networks.
•There were criticisms of the SABC’s news coverage of certain provinces,
particularly the more rural ones.
42
Analysis of submissions
Comments received
News
• There were calls for more positive news stories to be given airtime and there were
appeals for less violence in news bulletins.
• It was suggested that the SABC’s role in news should emphasise its independence
above other principles.
• It was suggested the policy should not refer to the role of news in nation-building
as this is more appropriately the role of the state.
• It was suggested that the policy include a clause on the coverage of Africa.
• It was suggested that the policy include a clause on the coverage of crime stating
that there should be a context and explanation in reporting of crime.
• It was suggested that the policy explain the decision making structure around
apologies and corrections.
• There were calls for additional clauses on gender issues to be included in the
policy.
• There were suggestions that the policy should provide for more positive coverage,
particularly of government initiatives.
• There were calls for the term “public interest” to be defined or not to be used at all.
43
Analysis of submissions
Programming
Programming policy - comments made
536
64
General
comments
Specific
recommendations
“I am writing to view my shock at what is
aired over 5fm airways during family
friendly hours. A week ago Mark
Gillman said to a 14 year old kid at
about 7am ‘Does your Dad ever take a
swing at you? I hope you have a wall
behind you when he does’. This is
unacceptable and I want to know why
he is allowed to continue with such
behavior”. (Craig French)
Comments received
• 600 comments were received on the Programming policy which amounted to 45%
of total comments received on all policies. 536 of the comments were general in
nature, with only 22 of these general comments from organisations. 64 specific
suggestions were made on the policy.
• There were many complaints about sex, violence, profanity and sci-fi shows.
• There were complaints that too many adverts are broadcast.
• There were many complaints about the recent changes to SAFM and there were
many appeals for there not to be changes to RSG.
44
Analysis of submissions
Programming
Comments received
• There was the view that the policy should provide for an independent
ombudsperson against whom complaints can be lodged. There was also a
suggestion that the BCCSA be asked to administer complaints against the SABC’s
policies. There was an appeal that the complaints be dealt with quicker, that
quarterly complaints report be sent to board and be made public. Another
suggestion was that members of the public assist the Broadcast Compliance team
or that a toll free number be provided for the lodging of complaints.
• There were suggestions that the watershed be moved later.
• There were suggestions that the policy provide for profanity to be edited out or for
additional provisions on profanity including a dedicated symbol.
• Submissions suggested that the clause on children allow for participation by
children in developing programmes and a commitment to provide a variety of genres
for children.
•There was a suggestion that the policy commit to showing less violence.
45
Analysis of submissions
Religion
Religion policy - comments made
115
26
General
comments
“We appreciate to see
programmes of all religions
such as Hindi, Islam etc. But
why should Christianity still
dominate even today?” N
Tshabalala, no. 557
Specific
recommendations
Comments received
• 141 comments were received on the Religion policy which amounted to 10% of
total comments received on all policies
• There were suggestions that the only criterion in the policy for allocating airtime
should be the amount of support for each religion and that these quotas be stated in
the policy. However, there was also the submission that the policy allow for each
religion to be treated equally.
46
Analysis of submissions
Religion
Comments received
• There was both support for and opposition to the policy’s emphasis on multi-faith
programmes. The RBP suggested that the policy stipulate that 80% of each
religion’s programming will be made up of faith specific programming.
• There were suggestions that the policy emphasise “affirmative action” on religion
but there were also suggestions that there was no need to address the past.
• There was both support for the concept of paid religious broadcasting and criticism
of this.
47
Analysis of submissions
Universal Service and Access
Universal Access policy - comments made
“All technological know-how
should be harnessed so that
citizens gain access”. P
Kondile, no. 642
50
50
40
30
20
9
10
0
General comments
Specific
recommendations
Comments received
• 59 comments were received on the Universal Service and Access policy which
amounted to 4% of total comments received on all policies. In real terms, this policy
attracted the least number of specific suggestions – only 9.
• There were a number of complaints received about the lack of services in
particular areas, particularly in rural areas.
48
Analysis of submissions
Universal Service and Access
Comments received
• There was the suggestion that the policy state how marginalised groupings will be
given access and that it give more attention to promoting access by people with
disabilities, including the blind.
• Submissions suggested that the policy emphasise that the goal of universal access
takes precedence over economic efficiency.
• There was a suggestion that the % universal service coverage targets laid out in
the policy are not high enough.
• There was the view that the terms “access” and “service” need to be dealt with
distinctly.
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Next steps
• Full report has been made to top management and Board (early October)
• Board has approved that the policies be re-worked in certain areas. These include:
• Mandate (upward referral)
• Consolidated approach to meeting the needs of the deaf
• Clauses on privacy, protection of sources, race, gender, disability, HIV/ Aids,
Children, Africa, crime, reporting between elections etc
• Scheduling of educational programmes
• Dealing with complaints – ombudsperson?
• Role of the RBP
• Internal workshops to be held during October / November – suggestions will be
discussed and re-drafting will be agreed on.
• Board to approve final policies in December
• Policies to be submitted to ICASA before 31 December
• Publicity campaign providing feedback to public to resume in December.
• Training programmes on new policies will roll-out in January
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Conclusion
• Campaign successful - exceeded SABC expectations.
• Had to run campaign within severe constraints including very tight time-table,
budget constraints, fairly arbitrary list of policies in the Broadcasting Act, DoC
consultation on similar issues at the same time.
• Key success – achieved a certain amount of goodwill amongst stakeholders and
public.
• Key challenge going forward - to meet their expectations.
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Thank you
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