Bloomsburg University of PA.
T.A.L.E. Seminar
Awareness of Global Cultures in the
Classroom: Challenge for BU Teachers!
Presenter
W. Emeka Obiozor, Ed.D
Department of Exceptionality Programs
February 7, 2008
Outline
 The Issue
 Challenge for Resource Persons
 Recognition of Global Cultures
 Meaning of Global Cultures
 Classroom Awareness
 Sources of Information
 Why Teach Global Cultures?
 Activities in the Classroom
 Concluding Statement
 Appendix:-What do you know about this…?!
 References
The Issue
• Increasing pressure to specialize
• Interactions with citizens of many nations
Need to learn about the traditions, values,
and problems of other people/life
• Sensitive to environmental issues that affect
us all. (http://www.kutztown.edu/acad/intlstudies/home.asp)
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The Focus
Global History
Arts & Fashion
Economy
Politics
Religion
Science & Technology , ETC.
Challenge for Resource Persons
Who? - The Faculty/Instructors
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Knowledge of multicultural diversity/global
cultures
Reaction to student’s questions on global issues
Learning/teaching global cultures
Share information /apply them in class lectures,
discussions, illustrations
Assign students tasks on cultural diversity/global
cultures
Encourage views/discussions on ancient traditions
from other societies – Greek, African, Irish, Roman,
Native American, Asian, Scandinavian, Spanish, etc.
Promotion of global cultures in class
Need assistance from BU faculty?
Recognition of Global Culture
The true contribution of a culture consists, not in
the list of inventions which it has personally
produced, but in its difference from others. The
sense of gratitude and respect which each single
member of a given culture can and should feel
towards all others can only be based on the
conviction that the other cultures differ from his
own in countless ways, even if the ultimate essence
of these differences eludes him or if, in spite of his
best efforts, he can reach no more than an imperfect
understanding of them. ..”
 "
-Claude Levi-Strauss
Recognition of Global Culture
“People's lives around the globe are
linked more deeply, more intensely,
more immediately than ever before.
This opens many opportunities …
Global integration is proceeding at
breakneck speed and with amazing
reach. But the process is uneven and
unbalanced with uneven participation
of countries and people in the
expanding opportunities of
globalization in the global economy,
in global technology, in the global
spread of cultures and in global
governance…”
(http://www.globaled.org/issues/158/e.html)
Recognition of Cultures
"Contacts between people and their cultures-their
ideas, their values, their ways of life-have been
growing and deepening in unprecedented ways.
Television now reaches families everywhere. For
many, the exposure to new cultures is exciting, even
empowering. For others, it is disquieting, as they try
to cope with a rapidly changing world...”
(http://www.globaled.org/issues/158/e.html)
Meaning of Global Culture
What is Culture?
According to the Society for American Archaeology (1996),
culture is a set of learned beliefs, values and behaviors
the way of life shared by the members of a society.
What is Global Culture?
According to Pearson Education (2004), global culture
emerges from the way in which national cultures
interact with each other. The challenge for global
organizations is to operate in a way which spans a
variety of national cultures.
Creation of Global Culture Awareness
Curriculum
Course Content (Syllabus)
Class Instruction
Demonstrations/Activities
Research – projects, reports, etc.
Class Discussions – hints, quizzes, assignments
Seminars, Workshops & Conferences
Sources of Global Culture Information
“It is great when someone explains the sentiments of a foreign culture
in terms that are understandable to yours.” Dave Johnson
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Resource persons/experts
Internet
Radio
Television
Video clips
Newspapers
Magazines
Books
Art materials
Drama
Word of Mouth
Other technological resources, e.g. projectors
Why Teach Global Cultures?
• Cultural creativity in the classroom.
•Share information on societal behaviors, values, ethics, etc,
•Critical thinking (Rothenberg, 2003).
•Mobilize, motivate, enrich and empower global participation.
•Live interdependently with people of other societies.
•Fosters student readiness and interest to explore foreign
lands and languages
•Develop personal connection to the world around them
(www.performance-education.com).
• Promotion of international cooperation, peace, tourism, brands,
products, trade & commerce.
Classroom
Activities
Samples from Andrew F. Smith
TESTING GENERALIZATIONS
 Read and Understand: Based on a given reading,
students should be asked to respond to given
statements (next page).
 Next page shows listed several generalizations that
one might make about the process called "the
globalization of culture.”
Classroom Activities – cont.
1. The "speeding up" of time is a merely the normal progress of
civilization.
2. Technologically advanced nations will always dominate nations not
as well equipped.
3. English is the logical global language.
4. There are more things that unite the world's peoples than separate
them.
5. There will never be only one culture.
6. It is possible for people to have multiple identities.
7. The natural flow of culture is that people continually move and
interact, and in so doing exchange, absorb or reject cultural ideas.
8. "Local cultures" are more powerful than national cultures.
9. Consumer demands tend to indicate the level of culture of an area.
10. The world can be politically united, but not united in a single
culture.
11. The Internet and cellular phone will bring into being a totally new
and different "metaculture."
12. Because people are constantly being brought into contact with one
another through the advances in technology & communication will
increase opportunities for disagreements & clashes among various
cultures.
Concluding Statement
Understanding and appreciating global culture
ultimately promotes clearer communication among
peoples, breaks down barriers, builds trust and interactions,
strengthens relationships, opens horizons, yields great results
and successes in our instructional challenges and life tasks.
“… The notion of world civilization can only be accepted therefore, as a sort
of limiting concept or as an epitome of a highly complex process. There is
not, and can never be, a world civilization in the absolute sense in which that
term is often used, since civilization implies, and indeed consists in, the
coexistence of cultures exhibiting the maximum possible diversities. A world
civilization could, in fact, represent no more than a worldwide coalition of
cultures, each of which would preserve its own originality."
-Claude Levi-Strauss
References
Web Resources
www.actewagl.com.au/education/Glossary/default.aspx
www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture
www.diversityrx.org/HTML/ESGLOS.htm
www.faculty.harker.org/BeverleyM/LITINTOFILM/glossary3.html
http://www.globaled.org/issues/158/e.html
http//:kwintessential.co.uk/resources/country-profiles.html
www.millicentrogers.org/glossary.htm
www.oregonstate.edu/instruct/anth370/gloss.html
www.performance-education.com
www.pearsoned.com/pr_2004/index.htm - 27k
http://www.phoenixms.org/globalcultures.htm
www.promotingexcellence.org/i4a/pages/Index.cfm
http://www.saa.org/publications/sampler/terms.html
http://soundroots.org/2007/08/blogday-2007.html
www.tesol.org/assoc/k12standards/it/10.html
www.usinfo.state.gov/products/pubs/geography/glossary.htm
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